Can art affect lives?

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  1. #1
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    Can art affect lives?

    I've been pondering those sense-of-life things lately (I do that alot, especially after absorbing much carbohydrates) and well, I came to some conclusions, but I'm wondering what yours are.

    See, there's a purpose to most of professions. As in, lawyers are supposed to maintain some justice, masons build human's shelters, urbanists plan human's living space, medicine doctors... you get the drill.

    But can art affect human lives? And I don't mean affecting the artist's life. I mean, does it affect the viewer? As an artist, you can get inspiration out of someone else's work, but how can ordinary people benefit from art? I don't think I know anyone ( out of non-artists ) who gives second thought to artpieces he sees, they just glance at it, stare if it's particularly impressive, and then move on. Can fine art have such an impact on people that it could push them to make changes in the world around them? Affect decissions they make?

    Aren't artists just a bunch of parasites who work for the sole purpose of satisfying their own ambition or at most, give some brief, insignificant visual pleasure?

    I am really not trying to insult anyone (duh, I'm trying to be an artist myself) , I'm just questioning if an artist career is a way to satisfy one's selfish ambitions or if it can serve any greater purpose.

    What are your reasons behind making art?

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  3. #2
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    So much of what you see every day has its roots in art - your tshirt designs, car, house, down to the plates you eat from. They're not in a gallery, no, but they were designed and made to look a certain way.

    And that's just things that have other purposes than being art. Art has the ability to entertain, to intrigue, to cause self reflection, move, etc. And, through media, it's defining your reality and mine (go read Baudrillard).

    Art (and consequently design) gives us opportunity to transcend the barriers of traditional language and communicate on a whole new level.

    Aren't artists just a bunch of parasites who work for the sole purpose of satisfying their own ambition or at most, give some brief, insignificant visual pleasure?
    you might want to rethink your words here, you're going to piss a lot of people off with that .

    hope this starts to clarify stuff, if not then shout.

    Brendan Noeth

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    Imagine what the following would look like if no visual artist was involved in their making:

    cars
    buildings
    furniture
    your computer
    movies
    computer games
    silverware
    clothes
    books

    Society doesn’t *need* elegantly designed forks, or computer games that are fancier-looking than what Atari once made, or fancy images of imaginary places; but people *want* these things. When they stop wanting these things, they will stop paying for them.

    I make art because I enjoy the process, because others enjoy the product, and because it pays my bills.

    I enjoy having common objects around me that are made by artists because I will be inclined to keep and use them for decades longer than I would be inclined to keep some piece of factory-made junk. Artists of everyday items are better for the environment because their work is not as often considered to be disposable.

    Image-making is a form of communication, and I am interested in using it to better the world much like any writer or painter of religious iconography could do. This is a long-term goal of mine.

    I think you are awesome, and I wish you the best in your endeavors, but I am tired of repeating myself, I am very busy with my new baby, and I am no longer a regular participant here, so please do not contact me to ask for advice on your career or education. All of the advice that I have to offer can already be found in the following links. Thank you.

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    "_____"career is a way to satisfy one's selfish ambitions or if it can serve any greater purpose.
    This attitude can be applied to ANYTHING.
    Careers DON'T do anything. It's the PEOPLE who make the differences.
    It's what YOU do with your career, that will serve any "greater purpose"...if you choose.

    "If one advances confidently in the direction of
    his dreams, and endeavors to live the life he
    has imagined, he will meet with a success
    unexpected in common hours."
    - H.D. Thoreau
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seedling View Post
    Society doesn’t *need* elegantly designed forks, or computer games that are fancier-looking than what Atari once made, or fancy images of imaginary places; but people *want* these things. When they stop wanting these things, they will stop paying for them.
    I'll have to disagree with you on that. Society does need them, yes people may not want specifically want pretty forks and the likes, but they still need the aesthetic fix one way or another. That's the thing people do want things that look nice, we wouldn't create them to like nice if they didn't. It's (for must of us) in our nature to want art or artsy things, things that are pleasing to the eye or communicate in one interesting way or another.
    Sure, the fork isn't needed to look nice, the atari development doesn't have to happen, but they're specifics; the base of it, the looking nice, that does need to happen and people will make sure it does.

    I think the very fact that they haven't stopped paying for them yet pretty much proves that, and even when they can't afford to pay for them people will always find art elsewhere.


    As for the original question: Yes. I could go into more detail, but that'd make this one hell of a post and I'm too lazy right now.

    As for are artists just parasites[?] No, of course not. They produce something to sell, and if people don't want it the artists starve. They earn their worth, and there's no parasitic side to it whatsoever, because they do produce something that people want, nay, need!

    Last edited by Rhynome; June 11th, 2007 at 01:42 PM.
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    I get your point. Yes, I know that most of objects everyone uses everyday was designed by someone, probably an artist. But my point is that I would still overuse my computer, my tv, radio and microwave even if it didn't look half as fancy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brendan N
    Art has the ability to entertain, to intrigue, to cause self reflection, move, etc. And, through media, it's defining your reality and mine (go read Baudrillard).
    Care to elaborate on that? (:

    And that's an interesting point about enviroment, Seedling, now that I think about it...
    And also, the 'form of communication' part - that's exactly what's on my mind when I think about how art itself can be useful. I'm torn between resuming technical education and pursuing a dream of making an illustrated novel for kids. But, don't you think it doesn't make any difference whether it's good art or kitsch when it comes to communicating your thoughts? I know that it does make a difference to me, because I'm into art and am allergic to clichés. But does it matter to an ordinary man who prefers busty elves to most sophisticated work of art? If it conveys your thoughts, what does it matter if it's refined or simple?

    When was the last time you were so moved by a particular piece of fine art that you changed your aproach to any aspect of life (not including any purely artistic reflections)? Was it a traditional painting or a comic? Or maybe, which affects your view of life more - novels and movies or paintings?

    Also, do ordinary people with no interest in art even care if something looks correct in terms of composition, colour choice etc. ? Does having a visually (un)actractive website affect how well your products sell? I know that any employer would more likely hire someone with better skill and taste, but that's not necessary because of need, more because he has a choice. The question is, does it matter for the potential client that visits his site or reads ads?

    And then, does it cause more respect when you say "I make fine art" than "I'm an architect"? Or "I paint cubistic art for living" as opposed to "I wrote that high school textbook about the theory of relativity " ?


    Do you think people have an actual need for experiencing art? As in, would it change their life for worse if they were deprived of it? And futuristic paintings - can they point directions for development because of their artistic quality or technical thought behind them?

    Man, I think sometimes I ask too much questions. Sorry for that, smack me if I'm thinking too deep into that. Maybe I need to get a job to rid myself of free time for wondering about abstract matters.
    And when I say 'ordinary' people (just for the record) I don't mean to look down on people without artistic background P:
    And, Brendan, you might have a point, but I won't rephrase the parasites I meant it in a neutral way.
    I'm still not sure if I conveyed my thoughts fully, maybe I need to organise them. Until then--

    P.S. oooh, new posts *dies*
    will reply as soon as I get my next dose of sweets.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhynome View Post
    I'll have to disagree with you on that. Society does need them, yes people may not want specifically want pretty forks and the likes, but they still need the aesthetic fix one way or another.
    Actually, I agree with this; however, people do not need any one particular aesthetic thing. An illustrated copy of the Lord of the Rings is not necessary on its own, a pretty set of forks is not necessary on its own, a pretty view of a lake from a window is not necessary on its own; but each person will reach for some visual beauty of some sort.


    [edit] Rinmon - you ask good questions, and I'm going to need some time to think about them. :-)

    I think you are awesome, and I wish you the best in your endeavors, but I am tired of repeating myself, I am very busy with my new baby, and I am no longer a regular participant here, so please do not contact me to ask for advice on your career or education. All of the advice that I have to offer can already be found in the following links. Thank you.

    Perspective 101, Concept Art 101, Games Industry info,Oil Paint info, Acrylic Paint info, my sketchbook.
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    Hmmm...I guess art gives "non-artists" something to dream of - and dreams can change the world

    Quote Originally Posted by Ilaekae
    "Art is the physical result of your soul battling with your intellect to the death...with a sharp pencil..."
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    Quote Originally Posted by rinmon View Post
    Man, I think sometimes I ask too much questions. Sorry for that, smack me if I'm thinking too deep into that.
    *SMACK*
    You asked for it.


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    Quote Originally Posted by corky13 View Post
    Hmmm...I guess art gives "non-artists" something to dream of - and dreams can change the world
    Have you been watching Disney films again?
    Man, what have I told you about doing that? Remember, one a month, two tops.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhynome View Post
    Have you been watching Disney films again?
    Man, what have I told you about doing that? Remember, one a month, two tops.
    *lol* xD sorry boss but Disney knows how to draw hot chicks

    Quote Originally Posted by Ilaekae
    "Art is the physical result of your soul battling with your intellect to the death...with a sharp pencil..."
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    Quote Originally Posted by rinmon View Post
    I get your point. Yes, I know that most of objects everyone uses everyday was designed by someone, probably an artist. But my point is that I would still overuse my computer, my tv, radio and microwave even if it didn't look half as fancy.


    Care to elaborate on that? (:
    No, sorry . There's a lot more to it than a simple explanation, and I'm still learning this stuff. Art is at the core of culture, and culture is one of the deciding factors where a individual's identity is concerned. Of course it gets complicated from there on due to capitalism, consumerism and mass media and the fact that art is intertwined with them. Point is art has as much to do with the identity of the non-artist as it has with the artist, if not more.

    Sorry if I'm not making sense, really tired and need to get back to work. Hope that helped some .

    Brendan Noeth

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    yes....

    first

    take the negative first

    examples of effect:

    the dutch newspaper cartoon that caused uproar for the Muslim community....

    World war 2 propaganda, art was used to make enemies appear monsterous, to illustrate the threat of the axis power to create a sense of community... to programs peoples emotions

    Art also serves as a document of time, how much of our historical infromation of certains period in hinstory are based on paintings or sculpture.

    Art is a form of communication, a snapshot of human emotions,it is like lightning in a bottle.
    It is answers and askes of us questions that we can not otherwise communicate.


    if the answer was no, would C.A exist?

    SKETCHBOOK

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    I think art can change they way people think. It also does well in recording history and provoking thought dealing with culture and what not. Political cartoons, for one. They make people think about common issues and sometimes motivate them to try and do something about them.

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    short answer: yes
    long answer: of course

    David was a key actor in the drama of the French Revolution. if one ever has doubt the to influence of civic duty of art upon a society, go look up some Neoclassical History Paintings. or Goya's Shooting of May 3rd 1808, or that Picasso guy's Guernica. when Hitler was roundin' up his idea of degenerate's in society, one of his first targets were radical artists. Art is a powerful tool when utilized properly.

    real Art always serves function (and it's up to you to determine what constitutes "art", it's not something someone else can answer for you, art is subjective.) the cave paintings in France from several thousand years BC, served a purpose, just as Rothko's color field paintings serve purpose.

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    Define "affect."

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    Last edited by Ilaekae; June 11th, 2007 at 10:10 PM.
    No position or belief, whether religious, political or social, is valid if one has to lie to support it.--Alj Mary

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    Jägerpiratgruppe acht?

    Heh, I think the kitty hit the nail on the head, and sure, he showed negative effects, but we know of positive ones too, and will think of them upon seeing the Jägerpiratgruppen... "Yarrwohl!"

    Last edited by Rhynome; June 11th, 2007 at 07:33 PM.
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    Art has affected my life.

    It's why I'm writing this message right now.

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    okey , if you look at it from a "business"-kind of view = Art is a way to influence peoples minds , to make them willing/more open to accept certain ideas , be they "good" or "bad"

    Quote Originally Posted by Ilaekae
    "Art is the physical result of your soul battling with your intellect to the death...with a sharp pencil..."
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    Of course we need art! Heck, thousands of years ago neanderthals painted on walls as a form of art. So, practically speaking, its in all of us as a way to express ourselves. Art is a very broad thing, as it involves everything that is not directly related to surviving...no wait, that's wrong too: Cooking can be also a form of art. Ugh, NOW I'm confused

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    Remember we were all "normal" people at one time, and art affected us enough to go down the artistic path. Art begets art, but not just for arts sake, as illustrated in the points above...

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    Quote Originally Posted by rinmon View Post
    When was the last time you were so moved by a particular piece of fine art that you changed your approach to any aspect of life (not including any purely artistic reflections)? Was it a traditional painting or a comic? Or maybe, which affects your view of life more - novels and movies or paintings?
    Of all the art with a message that has had an effect on me, one of the greatest is Rodin’s Caryatid Who Has Fallen under Her Stone. The character Jubal Harshaw in Heinlein’s Stranger in a Strange Land wrote the following about this statue:

    “...Here we have an [...] emotional symbol - but wrought with exquisite artistry. [...For] three thousand years architects designed buildings with columns shaped as female figures. At last Rodin pointed out that this was work too heavy for a girl. He didn’t say, ‘Look, you jerks, if you must do this, make it a brawny male figure.’ No, he showed it. This poor little caryatid has fallen under the load. She’s a good girl - look at her face. Serious, unhappy at her failure, not blaming anyone, not even the gods... and still trying to shoulder her load, after she’s crumpled under it.

    “But she’s more than good art denouncing bad art; she’s a symbol for every woman who ever shouldered a load too heavy. But not alone women - this symbol means every man and woman who ever sweated out life in uncomplaining fortitude until they crumpled under their loads. It’s courage [...] and victory.

    “Victory in defeat, there is none higher. She didn’t give up[...]; she’s still trying to lift that stone after it has crushed her. She’s a father working while cancer eats away his insides, to bring home one more pay check. She’s a twelve-year-old trying to mother her brothers and sisters because mama had to go to Heaven. She’s a switchboard operator sticking to her post while smoke chokes her and fire cuts off her escape. She’s all the unsung heroes who couldn’t make it but never quit.”

    This statue didn’t make me suddenly change my perspective on the world – but how often in one life does a piece of fiction or nonfiction completely change one’s paradigm? Instead it pummeled me with emotional impact that made me think, and think deeply, about society and the role of individuals bearing heavy responsibilities. The statue nagged at me long after I saw it; I couldn’t stop thinking about it. And that, I believe, is where the power lies in art to do social good. An image can be used to catch someone’s attention, tell them something, and then leave them thinking about that something for long enough that it eventually affects their actions.

    Other examples of individual pieces of illustrative art that have affected me:

    A tiny etching of a sprouting seed with the caption “my religion has something to do with compost.” It nagged at me for so long that I bought the print a year after having first seen it. This strange little metaphor has colored my attitudes towards personal development ever since.

    An image that I never saw, but merely read a description of: someone had taken a bright and happy children’s illustration of Noah’s Arc and replaced the water with a photo of bodies from the Holocaust. It has been a reminder to me that the cute and fluffy bits of religion aren’t necessarily harmless.

    A lifelike sculpture of two overweight shoppers wearing bright clothes and carrying bulging shopping bags. The look on their faces is ever so slightly sad and tired. I don’t know the statue’s or the artist’s name, because I saw the sculpture in a highschool art textbook long ago. A quote by the author said that he was tired of yelling to make a point, and with this sculpture he had decided that a whisper could be just as powerful. He was right. I’m rather non-materialistic, and this sculpture played a part in that.

    There are several paintings by illustrator Michael Whelan that stuck with me – images of titanic technological ruins. These got me thinking about what our civilization will leave behind when we are gone, and has had an impact on my attitudes towards reusing/reducing/recycling.

    In general, I have been affected more by novels and movies. I chalk this up to the modern split in the arts, where fine arts has by and large gone off into a la-la land of paint smears that communicate nothing successfully, and illustrative arts have gone almost entirely to the support of printed media and movies. It has been a hundred years since there was a large market for illustrations that tell their own story.

    Quote Originally Posted by rinmon View Post
    Also, do ordinary people with no interest in art even care if something looks correct in terms of composition, color choice etc. ?
    The questions you should really be asking are “Who is my audience?”, “What do I have to say to my audience that is so important?”, “How am I going to say it?”, and “How do I make a living by doing this?”

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    I think you are awesome, and I wish you the best in your endeavors, but I am tired of repeating myself, I am very busy with my new baby, and I am no longer a regular participant here, so please do not contact me to ask for advice on your career or education. All of the advice that I have to offer can already be found in the following links. Thank you.

    Perspective 101, Concept Art 101, Games Industry info,Oil Paint info, Acrylic Paint info, my sketchbook.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rinmon View Post
    can art affect lives?
    yes






    ....pays my bills.

    J.L. ALFARO


    "Be who you are and say what you feel,because those that mind don't matter and those that matter don't mind."
    -Dr. Seuss


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    I just draw to have a legitimate reason why I need to touch dead people in morgues...to "study" anatomy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell
    *SMACK*
    You asked for it.
    Oh Elwell, I knew it'd be you to say that. You're such a big bully.

    'nyways sorry for the lag, school catched up with me somehow.


    Magic Man: well, I only draw because I'm addicted to crt radiation and I felt bad about lying to my mom that I don't spend 24/7 in front of a comp doing 'nothing'.

    Rhineville: yes, we all thought at some point 'omg that painting is soo coool! I wanna paint like that too' P:

    Haymaker: are you sure you didn't mean 'art can be also a form of cooking' ?

    Otis: *throws you a cookie* agreed in 666%! That's part of the reason why I hesitate whether to pursue art or something utilitary by default. But I guess it's the problem with any job - if you're not one of the best, you're left with doing works that almost anyone could do, hence world basically doesn't need you much. The only difference is that you don't need a degree to make art.... or so I hope ;x

    Ilaekae: 'affect' as NOT in 'affect patterns on your panties or badges on your schoolbag' so that's a miss :3

    Grief: I'm not sure what you're implying. Hitler was paranoid, he'd shoot his own mother if she looked at him in an odd way. Okay, so artists are also chroniclers... that's rather obvious utilitary value now that you mentioned it.. Not that those paintings change much, it's more about about the events they portray. But the point remains.

    Seedling! Thank you for this post, these are some really serious points for me to reconsider. I was kinda thinking about how it's sad that you need to have a degree in fine arts to start understanding most of art pieces' load of symbolic meaning. Then I thought that the problem doesn't lay in the art itself but in the fact that (however cliche it sounds) we're a society of mass media and if the artist wants to get through to us, he has to feed his statement with a spoon. That lead me to conclusion that even if your art is really clear, there's no way to get through to everyone (however obvious it is). Mostly because most people simply don't care about what you're trying to say. And even if they do care, still, as you said, one piece of art, or even a book or movie isn't enough to change a man.


    You know, there's been this commercial on our tv recently. It goes like: there's this man who's always on the run and he doesn't even have time to answer calls from his dad. Then he gets a call from hospital that his dad had a seizure or something. He drives there like mad to find that there's only an empty room left. The guy sits down and when he's about to start crying it turns out his dad was only assigned a new room. Then the lector says something like 'Don't wait with saying how much you love them until it's too late'. Shit, I know it's a sappy story but my eyes are getting wet everytime I see this commercial and it really makes me think about my family, my friends and life in general. Even though it doesn't say anything I haven't seen or known yet. It's really simple visually, it has no dialogues, and it works. It reminded me that art is actually just a tool. It doesn't matter how well you paint or sculpt, as long as you're able to stir emotions that make the viewer think about all those good and bad things associated with being human and about their consequences. The artist's job is to let people touch the things that they otherwise would never experience or imagine in their life. Or remind them what they might have forgotten.

    And I realised that you don't become an artist to be able to paint pretty things, but to learn to express the thoughts and feelings that were already in you, only you didn't know how to convey them.

    Shiet, I'm talking like a maybelline commercial ;x


    Anyways, whatever I'd write, it'll sound corny.
    I don't know if art can really change the way people think, because I've never been really that affected by any particular work of art. Maybe it depends on one's level of sensitivity. Maybe it doesn't affect thinking in a direct way, but works on a random basis and might result in totally different conclusions than the author intended. Maybe art is just an excuse to stop for a while and reconsider few things.

    Ha, corniness ftw. (and I feel like I reinvented a wheel three times over). Thanks guys for your POVs, I feel so much more confident now. If I don't manage to be a wise artist, at least maybe I'll draw some landscapes for people to decorate their kitchens, which might result in less raw steaks for dinners.
    Sorry for monstruous post, I should get myself a blog.

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    Sorry Rinmon, I'm holding with my original contributions...

    Both the various pirate flags and the entire carefully coordinated "corporate I.D." of the Nazi regime were meant to instill fear/terror/sense of power and unity to those using them. This definitally affected the world, lives and history--and still does today--. Ask a survivor of one of the 15 to 30,000,000 people who died under the symbol of the swastika if they thought art didn't affect their lives, and not just the symbol itself, but the entire centrally controlled image of the regime, down to the note pads and museum exhibitions--all of which reinforced the "rights" of the regime to do as it did. The associations to the pirate banner had the same effect on group cohesiveness, terror, government planning and spending in reaction, etc.

    I would DEFINITELY say this art had a profound effect on people lives...

    ...and nearly eighty years later (if you need more proof), you can and will be arrested in Germany for the mere display of that flag I posted. Gawd knows what they do to you if tattoos are involved...


    ADD: And just to be sure we're on the same page here, I posted in direct answer to you're first question...

    "But can art affect human lives? And I don't mean affecting the artist's life. I mean, does it affect the viewer?"

    Last edited by Ilaekae; June 14th, 2007 at 12:56 PM. Reason: addition
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    As far as I know, those people didn't die for swastika itself, but for the man who chose this symbol to represent his dogmas. Yes, that's a simplification, they had many reasons overall. I can't even call Nazis flag a work of art. It's just a symbol of socialism, nationalism and swastika standing for Aryan's superiority. The supposed power of the swastika is simply a connotation of what was done under this flag. Works the same way as how Cross is associated with Christians. Originally swastika symbolized many different things that had nothing to do with Hitler, just as cross was just a device of punishment. It's the events that involved them make them cause certain impressions, not the fact that they were made to cause them. It's just a simple human's tendency to associate images with events. Has nothing to do with art, IMO.

    [EDIT]
    are we actually on the same page?
    What I had on mind when starting this topic whas the question if artist has the power to affect lives of people who view his works. In case of nazis banner, when Hitler chose swastika for his party, he didn't intend for it to be asociated with death camps and ruthless cruelty. He needed a common symbol for his people to wear, just to show which side they're on. The present connotation of swastika and homicides is because they wore it while doing all the scary things they did. If nazis were a peaceful religious sect proclaiming Aryan's superiority (which they could also manifest with swastika symbol), today we would wear swastika as a symbol of sun deity, as a talisman against evil etc. Also, if you'd never heard of nazis, you wouldn't associate swastika with anything bad. That's why this case is not one of art affecting life, rather the other way around.

    Last edited by rinmon; June 14th, 2007 at 02:16 PM.
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    You're missing my point, I think...I was NOT simply pointing out a flag. I used the image to represent the entire tightly controlled image of the Nazi Party. This particular "corporate I.D. program" is considered by most designers to be one of the most "successful" such programs in human history. This is art on a grand scale.

    It affected the German people in a good sense before there was ever any public knowledge of the problems and atrocities to come. THIS is an after-effect of the political policies of the entity using the art.

    There may be an inherent communication problem here that prevents us from actually agreeing on this subject. Your comments seem to indicate that you may not accept "conceptual graphic design" as an art. I get this from your "I can't even call Nazis flag a work of art." and then going on to state that it was simply a symbol of the National Socialists.

    First, this actually contradicts your other statements that the Swastika actually meant many other things first. (This is common knowledge. I even have a photograph in my collection somewhere of a bunch of little girls from a Jewish summer camp living in teepees they decorated with a pattern of Swastikas [ca. 1915-1920], in retrospect, a rather unnerving image...).

    Secondly, I was NOT calling the particular flag I posted a specific work of art, though under most definitions, it actually is. I posted it as an example of the larger "corporate image" I was trying to refer to. (The pirate symbol falls into the same category, even though it was a result of "naive" graphic design.) The overall purpose of the design program was to instill pride, a sense of unity and purpose, and to promote a perception of "Can Do!" to, for and about the German people/nation of the 1930-40s.

    My opinion is based on the fact that a set of symbols, no matter what their previous connotations, applied in a tightly controlled program that includes the design of clothing, public buildings, media, symbols of authority and rank, and even the production of consumer art, tied to a tightly controlled set of colors and auxiliary artifacts, not only can, but has, and will continue to affect the individual/collective viewer. There is simply no way to avoid the fact that this is art affecting the viewer.

    To broaden the discussion, we would have to deny that photography is art if we were to argue, for example, that the photographs taken on Black Sunday in 1956 and many other sites important to the civil rights movement, as well as many of the photos from Vietnam in the 60-70s, HAD ABSOLUTELY NO AFFECT on the viewing public. It MAY be just a personal thing affecting ONLY me, but to this day, I won't set foot in either of the-excuses-for-states of Mississippi or Alabama for love nor money...

    Running off at a tangent, may I mention the cartoons of Thomas Nast, the works of Picasso from the Spanish Civil war, and the contemporary cartoons/art/poster used by the pseudo-religious factions on both sides of the middle east fiasco as further examples of art affecting the average viewer, or would most of these have to be rejected as "non-art" also?



    [DISCLAIMER: There is usually a disclaimer here involving thelordofthebling, but it is at the shop getting a cleaning and wax...]

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    I am amazed at this thread.....art is everything left with our lives (and I mean everyone's lives, not just artists) when we're not breathing, eating, sleeping or defecating, and even then we try and put some art into those habits too....
    gawd, and the amount of analysis too....I'm exhausted, where do you get the energy from? and I must've missed the memo when a consensus was agreed upon on what art is...oh well...
    anyway, back to drawing....

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moz, gay what ? I thought it was interesting.

and to answer the question of your thread title as I was to lazy to read your whole discussion and simply skipped to the Quick Reply area.

Yes , art have affected my life. Thats for sure.

-Dennis

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