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  1. #136
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    drawings....

    Hi!I am new....
    I just want to show you some of my drawings...they are penn and ink, mostly colord with watercolor, and some color pencil.
    MeRo:


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  3. #137
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    some silly brush and pen ink stuff

  4. #138
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    Doodles...

    Just some doodles. The over the top military exaggerations began when I noticed the Commandos M-4 carbine had grown to heroic proportions... So I added more gizmos to it (a PAQ-4, Harris Bi-pod, silencer...) to bring it truly over the top. Then everything else in the sketch fell into place. All the ridiculous Cold War Era Hollywoodisms.

    Mechanical Pencil, Pilot Precise V5, Sharpie marker...
    Michael "Sudsy" Sutherland

    CA sketchbook

    Deviant Art Galleries:
    Sudsy Sutherland

  5. #139
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    Ink, and scanning...

    ...so I've done these with Windsor Newton ink for the black, and you can see how the gloss just doesn't really come out well in the scans. Any recommendations on scanning? Or even editing a bit? Any filters I should I know about?

    That or my inking technique on large areas of black. I used an 80# or so paper with a smooth surface for report covers and the like. Decent quality paper, maybe not along the lines of Bristol though... Feedback welcome!
    Michael "Sudsy" Sutherland

    CA sketchbook

    Deviant Art Galleries:
    Sudsy Sutherland

  6. #140
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    evanescence cover

    Well as the title suggests I drew the cover from the first evanescence album. Recently I have been having a load of fun with pens. I am how ever a cheep skate and used bic biros to do all my pen stuffs. There is more inky goodness in my sketch pad.

  7. #141
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    A quick question regarding nibs and ink flow...

    I just recently got into some serious ink work for my personal study - love it - and I'm running into some issues with some of my nibs. I'm using the Speedball 102 and 107 nibs and Winsor & Newton Black India Ink. Initially, it was okay and the flow was good and my lines clean and sharp. Now, on my third ink illustration, the nibs aren't as responsive. They all have this texture on the front that looks like it was scratched and the ink goes, clogs, and the nib digs into the paper.

    I bought some new ones to replace the old ones and dropped them into hot water for a while to remove the factory oils but now, they're also acting weird. Hopefully, after soaking them overnight in some pen cleaner normally reserved for technical pens, the nibs should be okay. If not, what should I do and is there a way to fix the problem?

    I also use paper towel or toilet paper to clean and dry my nibs after a good scrubbing with a toothbrush. Does that have anything to do with it? Or is it the shellac affecting the performance?

  8. #142
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    Hey ShroudStar, I cant really answer your question about whats wrong with your nibs, but using a lighter on the nibs when you get them brand new is a little easier than boiling them i think. Just wave the nib over the flame a few times and the oil will be gone.

    I guess just try to take it easier on your nibs, i havent been inking long so i havent had lots of mileage on mine, and i prefer brushes.

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  10. #143
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kman. View Post
    Hey ShroudStar, I cant really answer your question about whats wrong with your nibs, but using a lighter on the nibs when you get them brand new is a little easier than boiling them i think. Just wave the nib over the flame a few times and the oil will be gone.

    I guess just try to take it easier on your nibs, i havent been inking long so i havent had lots of mileage on mine, and i prefer brushes.
    Thanks. =) Looks like investing in one lighter for that purpose will be in order. I'll hate to ruin my nibs just trying to remove the oil. I'm just constantly dipping them in the pen cleaner now when they clog and it seems to work in cleaning them out for the next pass. I've also resorted to using a brush for some filling of areas and bolder line art. Seems to work well.

  11. #144
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    gotta love ink drawings, here are some of mine, though, thinking about it, they are all over a year old. ive been outta practice

    Inklings --- a place for ink drawings
    self portrait that has been exaggerated

    some party pics

    Inklings --- a place for ink drawings
    Inklings --- a place for ink drawings
    Inklings --- a place for ink drawings
    Inklings --- a place for ink drawings

    thought i would share this little gem, it involves ink, it is a print made from linoleum cuts, it was the biggest pain in the ass to make

    Inklings --- a place for ink drawings

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  13. #145
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    ShroudStar - keep practicing with a good brush... you may well find you prefer it for lots of things. As for the nibs, I can't tell exactly what's wrong in your case, but I find that I do have to replace them fairly often. One more trick you can try is to clean the nib tips with very fine-grit sandpaper.
    "Change is a virtue my friend... if you want to escape, all you have to do is make up your mind."
    John Cale / Bob Neuwirth


    Here be SKETCHIES...

    www.ccthrom.com

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  15. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShroudStar View Post
    I just recently got into some serious ink work for my personal study - love it - and I'm running into some issues with some of my nibs. I'm using the Speedball 102 and 107 nibs and Winsor & Newton Black India Ink. Initially, it was okay and the flow was good and my lines clean and sharp. Now, on my third ink illustration, the nibs aren't as responsive. They all have this texture on the front that looks like it was scratched and the ink goes, clogs, and the nib digs into the paper.

    I bought some new ones to replace the old ones and dropped them into hot water for a while to remove the factory oils but now, they're also acting weird. Hopefully, after soaking them overnight in some pen cleaner normally reserved for technical pens, the nibs should be okay. If not, what should I do and is there a way to fix the problem?

    I also use paper towel or toilet paper to clean and dry my nibs after a good scrubbing with a toothbrush. Does that have anything to do with it? Or is it the shellac affecting the performance?

    ShroudStar,

    You've really had some good advise, but I think there are different reasons for different things.

    First, I don't believe new nibs aren't always shipped with an oil coating, some have a lacquer. Soaking them in water (especially overnight ) will just rust the nib and make it rough. Some suggest you just clean them with your saliva and wipe with a paper towel, I personally do a quick soak in vinegar.

    If you are having issues with the nib clogging this could be caused by so many different things.

    I have heard of the flame but have not tried it, and the sand paper is a great idea especially when the pen points have become separated.

    Have you thought about your ink? I am not sure about the black indian ink, actually unless you are a cartoonist, I don't even know why you would use it - does it contain shellac? Shellac is one of the major reasons for clogging nibs - it's very hard to find ink with out it - if you like that deep of a black with no varied values - try Iron Gull, no shellac. Bullock at Kremer (sp?) pigments in NYC makes a great one (I can't remember Mr. Bullock's first name, but he does this on his own so just speak to him), it goes on smooth and thin but dries solid.

    If you do use a shellac ink, remember to only use distilled water if you need to thin and also keep a bit of denatured alcohol for dipping your nib when clogged.

    If you want some great ink, like the old masters used to sketch with, try the Bistre from Studio Products (if they still have some left). They use an oak gull, no shellac and age it like a fine wine! http://www.studioproducts.com

    Or get a sumi stone and ink block. There is also French company called Hebrin who makes a really nice non shellac ink that is used by calligraphers, but I like it for my work - they do have a color range and it does a lovely wash.

    Another big issue that you did not mention in the above post is the kind of paper you are using? Remember, if it isn't a hot press (plate pressed) or vellum (no washes), you are dealing with the rag issues of the paper and it's such a pain, although the results can be awesome for people that ink like myself.

    Watch how you treat the nibs, don't just throw them in a box, I use one of the plastic cottonell boxes with styrofoam in the bottom and keep the points up.

    Last but not least... pay major attention to your pen holder, if it is all plastic with a circle type indention in the tip, that's the spring you are going to get. I go on ebay and try and by the "lots" of holders because you get at least a few out of a bunch that are wonderful. The best are Gillotts but impossible to find, but it's the type that has a handle then a metal end with curled tip to slide the nib in, but you need to be careful because they are made for certain nib sizes.

    Good luck,
    Beth

    Sorry for the novel, ink is my passion , and if I am just repeating another's advise since I didn't read to the end of the thread.



    http://www.ewschott-fineart.com
    http://www.esartcenter.net

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  17. #147
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    Here's something I just did for Panels of the Week.
    Attachment 466357

  18. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by CCThrom View Post
    ShroudStar - keep practicing with a good brush... you may well find you prefer it for lots of things. As for the nibs, I can't tell exactly what's wrong in your case, but I find that I do have to replace them fairly often. One more trick you can try is to clean the nib tips with very fine-grit sandpaper.
    Thanks for the suggestions, CCThrom. I do have two new brushes in preparation for more inking practice down the line and I'm already using one to uniformly fill in spaces. It's very flexible and great for line correction, too. =) As for the sandpaper, looks like a trip to Home Depot will be coming in the future.

    Quote Originally Posted by ewschott View Post
    First, I don't believe new nibs aren't always shipped with an oil coating, some have a lacquer. Soaking them in water (especially overnight ) will just rust the nib and make it rough. Some suggest you just clean them with your saliva and wipe with a paper towel, I personally do a quick soak in vinegar.

    I have heard of the flame but have not tried it, and the sand paper is a great idea especially when the pen points have become separated.

    Shellac is one of the major reasons for clogging nibs - it's very hard to find ink with out it - if you like that deep of a black with no varied values - try Iron Gull, no shellac. Bullock at Kremer (sp?) pigments in NYC makes a great one (I can't remember Mr. Bullock's first name, but he does this on his own so just speak to him), it goes on smooth and thin but dries solid.

    If you do use a shellac ink, remember to only use distilled water if you need to thin and also keep a bit of denatured alcohol for dipping your nib when clogged.

    If you want some great ink, like the old masters used to sketch with, try the Bistre from Studio Products (if they still have some left). They use an oak gull, no shellac and age it like a fine wine! http://www.studioproducts.com

    Another big issue that you did not mention in the above post is the kind of paper you are using? Remember, if it isn't a hot press (plate pressed) or vellum (no washes), you are dealing with the rag issues of the paper and it's such a pain, although the results can be awesome for people that ink like myself.

    Watch how you treat the nibs, don't just throw them in a box, I use one of the plastic cottonell boxes with styrofoam in the bottom and keep the points up.

    Last but not least... pay major attention to your pen holder, if it is all plastic with a circle type indention in the tip, that's the spring you are going to get. I go on ebay and try and by the "lots" of holders because you get at least a few out of a bunch that are wonderful. The best are Gillotts but impossible to find, but it's the type that has a handle then a metal end with curled tip to slide the nib in, but you need to be careful because they are made for certain nib sizes.

    Good luck,
    Beth

    Sorry for the novel, ink is my passion , and if I am just repeating another's advise since I didn't read to the end of the thread.
    Thanks for the detailed help, Beth. Yes, my ink has shellac in it and it does clog fast. I'm keeping a small container of diluted pen cleaner next to me now to wipe the nibs along with a lint-free cloth and tissue paper. It does seem to help quite a bit.

    I love the deep, rich black. However, I did try Speedball's Super Black Ink before and that got sticky and unworkable on me fast. Winsor & Newton's at least is still fluid but I took a gander at that bistre ink and I think I'm in love. I'll look into picking up at least one. It looks really nice to work with and the bottle is pretty.

    My paper is from this hardbound spiral ring sketchbook with perforations and it feels like a lightweight bristol board. It takes ink wonderfully, but if the nib gets too deep, it does rip the paper. I'm thinking about picking up actual bristol board one of these days, but I'm leery of the bleedproof super-smooth inking papers. It's like a disaster waiting to happen if it doesn't dry well enough.

    My nibs are out in the open on lint-free cloth and rather well separated. I wouldn't think of tossing them nily-wily into anything. As for the holder, that's the kind Speedball provides. I took a look on Ebay for a Gillott holder and found someone in the UK selling not only a holder but a series of drawing nibs with it for an affordable price. Looks like another purchase. =)

    But yeah, seriously, for everyone who helped me, thanks. I hope to post some work up in a couple of months and at least now, I won't be wrecking nibs or grumbling over shellac or hot water.

  19. #149
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    I took a look on Ebay for a Gillott holder and found someone in the UK selling not only a holder but a series of drawing nibs with it for an affordable price. Looks like another purchase. =)
    Ha funny you should mention this! I had a note about the very subject with one of the sellers of the Gillott kit:

    Hi Beth,
    Joseph Gillott were taken over by William Mitchell many years ago and we buy our product direct from the manufactures. I can tell you that this mapping pen holder and the rest of our pen holders are 'real', but they are the type of pen holder that they make these days. I do have an original JG pen holder myself but they belong to me personally and not for sale. The only other other suggestion is to contact Frank Moody frank@william-mitchell.co.uk and ask him about the old pen holders yourself.
    kind regards,
    Jacqui
    I told him I thought Gillott would roll over in his grave if he saw the plastic pen holders with his name on them. The real ones are only wood.

    A good quality but not to expensive ink paper is by Borden & Riley called "#234 Paris Bleed Proof". You can get it at most online art supply stores.

    Go with the denatured alcohol, much cheaper than the cleaner!

    Always remember the more you sand - the sharper they get - the more torn the paper becomes - not to mention the more holes in your fingers and hands by grabbing your pen the wrong way.

  20. #150
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    Hey, since this thread has turned into a bit of a Q&A (a good thing I think, hard to find info on inking...), I'm curious about brushes and cleaning. Recently I had to replace a brush because the bristles got all flayed out, but I presumed that was because it was a crappy brush (it really was, some synthetic round with a plastic handle, came in a package of similar brushes for like $3 or something); but I now have a decent sable and I wouldn't want to get that ruined.

    So anyhow, I use Speedball ink and when I clean my brushes I let them soak in water for a couple minutes then I firmly squeeze the bristles out with a rag, soak 'em again quickly, squeeze, and repeat until I no longer see ink being diffused into the rag. I never let my brushes sit out with ink on 'em (if I'm switching brushes then the one I just used goes in the water and if it's more than a couple minutes before I get back to it I clean it with the rag).

    Should I worry about weakening the glue of the brush by oversoaking? Also I've read in some places that I should be cleaning my brushes with soapy water, should I? Usually I'd just go with what I've read, but I'm having a hard time finding consistant info.
    -My work can be found at my local directory thread.

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