Iraq - A Soldier's Perspective

Join 500,000+ Artists

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 28 of 28

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    New Haven, CT
    Posts
    2,988
    Thanks
    295
    Thanked 289 Times in 172 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Lightbulb Iraq - A Soldier's Perspective

    http://www.break.com/index/the-war-i...rspective.html


    This is done comic style; very powerful short film. Thought it was worth sharing.

    My work: [link]
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to Blue For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Santa Monica
    Posts
    670
    Thanks
    18
    Thanked 94 Times in 70 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    WOW! That is well done....art and animation too. Thanks for posting.

    You are a level 8 ninja and even though you have a lot of weapons sometimes your ninja moves are your most powerful.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    801
    Thanks
    19
    Thanked 427 Times in 168 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    This is just one excerpt from a series CBS did on the whole iraq war, I cant remember the title of it but it was really good.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Pasadena, CA
    Posts
    3,535
    Thanks
    236
    Thanked 307 Times in 195 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I was gonna say, is this from a REAL SOLIDER or is it just written in the First person? The art is fanTASTIC. Milligan? It isn't quite as textured but it has sort of the same feel.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    801
    Thanks
    19
    Thanked 427 Times in 168 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    The documentary that this short was made for came from a book of soldiers accounts in Iraq.

    No clue on who did the animation, if I remember the original name of the documentary I'll look it up.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,023
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 230 Times in 163 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    tx
    Posts
    2,150
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 13 Times in 5 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    very cool.. creative take on things. - JAG

    it's only after you've lost everything, that you're free to do anything..
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,350
    Thanks
    223
    Thanked 433 Times in 156 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Reminds me of Sin City, especially when he said "I was smoking like a chimney". Very very well done.

    Last edited by Costau D; May 4th, 2007 at 01:57 AM.
    ACTION SPEAKS LOUDER
    "Amateurs look for inspiration; the rest of us just get up and go to work. " -Chuck Close


    DRUNKEN WASTREL SKETCH GROUP:
    [ Costau D ][ Cuervo ][ Braintree ][ Fumble ][ Ookchk ][ RoboMonkey ]
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    sweden
    Posts
    7,475
    Thanks
    1,696
    Thanked 1,220 Times in 624 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
that was really nicely done! but still terrible in the end..
Great animation and "look" or style.. thanks for sharing it!

Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    2,522
    Thanks
    438
    Thanked 437 Times in 209 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Blue View Post
    very powerful short film. Thought it was worth sharing.
    I'll have to disagree with you on the powerful part, but it was extremely well executed and, I daresay, a pretty accurate reflection of a soldier's experience in Iraq. Myself and two friends are planning to do a similar animation for a school porject, so big thanks for posting this - I haven't come across many such animation to look up to. Definitely worth sharing, big thanks .

    Brendan Noeth

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    The Fortress of Solitude
    Posts
    1,619
    Thanks
    195
    Thanked 39 Times in 27 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I thought it was pretty powerful - I was just about to post this, a friend of mine sent it to me today, very well done. I'm gald this experience could be shared with the quality and energy behind it. I'm interested in seeing more about the whole documentary.

    - V

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Hamburg
    Posts
    310
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 9 Times in 6 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    This is probably the documentary which contains this well done animation:

    Operation Homecoming: Writing The Wartime Experience

    And the illustrator in charge appears to be a "Christopher Koelle" of Portland Studios.

    http://imdb.com/name/nm2559643/
    http://christopherkoelle.blogspot.co...ht-on-pbs.html

    This is his gallery site and contains some stills from the movie.
    http://www.christopherkoelle.com/gallery/

    The animation was done by "The Law of Few" as stated by C. Koelle in the second link above.

    Some more information on the CartoonBrew Homepage.

    Last edited by SgtDirtbag; May 4th, 2007 at 08:03 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Santa Monica
    Posts
    670
    Thanks
    18
    Thanked 94 Times in 70 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I thought the name Colby Buzzel sounded familiar. He got kinda famous when he started writing an anonymous blog during the early part of the war... without army approval. His book is called My War, Killing Time in Iraq.

    His blogspot is...

    http://cbftw.blogspot.com/

    You are a level 8 ninja and even though you have a lot of weapons sometimes your ninja moves are your most powerful.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    NZ
    Posts
    3,763
    Thanks
    2,126
    Thanked 1,004 Times in 654 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Definitely worth watching.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    Posts
    2,138
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 91 Times in 87 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    This is the artwork of Christopher Koelle... someone ripped this off obviously. It was aired as a segment in a program on PBS.

    http://christopherkoelle.blogspot.com/

    EDIT: Whoops... someone got to it already... sorry, mate.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • #16
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    808
    Thanks
    24
    Thanked 42 Times in 25 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thought it was well done but not particularly powerful. This does represent a pretty standard way of life for anybody in the combat arms deployed to iraq, but there's nothing special or unique to the story, I've been in more dangerous situations a number of times while deployed.

    Brendan, if you want some more perspectives on the Iraq war from a soldier's standpoint, PM me.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    4,913
    Thanks
    130
    Thanked 200 Times in 123 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Dose. I'm interested in more perspectives on the Iraq war from a soldier's standpoint... if you are OK please write it for everyone here,,, if it is all right with moderators... I read your reply in Photo thread and thanks for answering me...
    I do like to hear more... I asked my neighbor's son who returned from Iraq last two year ago... but he didn't tell much... Thanks in any outcome.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • #18
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    808
    Thanks
    24
    Thanked 42 Times in 25 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    sve,

    I'd be willing to put my perspective down for all to see, is there anything in particular that you'd like to hear about? If so, just ask, and if not, let me know and I guess I'll try and get as much down as possible.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    366
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 15 Times in 11 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Dose206 View Post
    sve,

    I'd be willing to put my perspective down for all to see, is there anything in particular that you'd like to hear about?
    I'm interested to hear what were your reasons to go. How important did you think that going there was, or did you just look it as a job. And did your view on things chance during your time there.
    Btw. Are we drifting out from the real topic?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    4,913
    Thanks
    130
    Thanked 200 Times in 123 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Well. I hope it would be your reminiscences... the order is not important... but to make you go into your memory I would like to start with some questions...what kind of person you were,,, are you different now after living through this... who were people around you... what did you see happened with them... you said you lost some friends there... who were they and what happened... did you think about danger all the time when you were outside the American base or you were trying to get yourself busy and preoccupied... were you scared before your first attack in which you participate? Were you always aware of danger after that? were you relaxed threre and when? about people there, local people,,, did you contact with them? were your food entirely dilvered from USA and allies? What kind of people are they? Son of my neighbor had a little contact with them... You said you were wounded there, several times... tell about those and how it happened if it is possible...How long you were there... How you were prepared for Army? Were any women in the army where you were? how food was there? what were your responsibilities there?

    well ... that's to start... fell free to skip what is not appropriate ...

    Last edited by sve; May 26th, 2007 at 02:25 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Kansas city, MO
    Posts
    1,167
    Thanks
    1,423
    Thanked 867 Times in 333 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    was that animated with flash? perhaps attached to planes in 3ds max? i have to know how this animated look was achieved. does look like the technique used in the intro to sin city and even spiderman movies. great artist.
    just found this today as well http://youtube.com/watch?v=-Wqvmqp-Q...elated&search=
    there seems to be a 3d element in there. the way things scroll seem as if the images are on planes with some actual 3d shapes like the helicopter.

    Last edited by Jason Ross; May 7th, 2007 at 10:43 PM. Reason: wanted to add more.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    London
    Posts
    2,447
    Thanks
    674
    Thanked 484 Times in 315 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    EDIT: I erased my comment here. I just got too upset about the subject, since it's very personal to me.

    The animation is cool, the design is cool, but the point is hurting me personally and i can't support anything like that.

    Peace,

    Last edited by Kan Muftić; May 8th, 2007 at 07:37 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • #23
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    808
    Thanks
    24
    Thanked 42 Times in 25 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    chupacabra, what point is being made that is hurting you personally, if I can ask. The point that I perceive as being made is that sometimes the job of a soldier in a combat zone is shitty but regardless of how you feel about it you just have to push it to the side, deal with it later and push on till you and your buddies can go home. Perhaps you're getting a different message and if so then I'd like to know what it is, and if you're getting the same message as I am, how is that hurting you?

    To Jho and sve, I will answer your questions soon, but tonight is not the night.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • #24
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    18
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    This shit is fucking tight man, nice job loved the animation work ahha *clap clap clap* well lates..
    Hykuri

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • #25
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    808
    Thanks
    24
    Thanked 42 Times in 25 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    jho and sve, sorry that it took so long for me to get around to this, but here i go:

    jho: well, my reason to go was because I was ordered to . but in all seriousness, I joined the Army knowing that I would deploy to either Iraq or Afghanistan, and that was okay with me at the time. I grew up in the US and had lived a very comfortable and privileged life and figured that was due in large part to the fact that I was born and raised here. As a way to repay the fortune that I had, I decided to join knowing I would have to fight.
    My view on things did change after I got back from there. Honestly while I was there I was thinking about anything but why I was there and so it wasn't until I got back that I had time to reflect and process.

    sve: I'll try and hit all of your questions, but it's getting late and so I may have to shorten things up a bit. When I joined the Army I was a pretty standard 18 year old kid. I drank and had spent a lot of time dabbling in drugs. I had average grades in school, and didn't really feel strongly about anything. However, I did feel like it was the right thing for me to do to join the military. I think that now I have grown and matured alot, partially because of my time in Iraq, partially other experiences in the Army and partially just because I'm older now.
    The people around me were your average collection of individuals. We had all types in my platoon. The soldiers from my platoon who were killed were SSG Kyle Eggers and SFC Todd Gibbs. If you google them you'll find a bunch of pages for them. I was with SSG Eggers when he was killed, I was actually injured in the attack as well. Our HMMWV (Hummer) was hit by an IED (Improvised Explosive Device). Eggers was killed instantly by shrapnel through his head and torso. The gunner sustained massive shrapnel wounds on the whole left side of his body. It has been a long road but he's recovered now. I caught some shrapnel in my thigh. I was driving the HMMWV because I was still recovering from an earlier shrapnel wound and couldn't function in my normal position as the gunner.
    Gibbs was killed while he was on foot. There was a IED buried and he was practically standing on it when it went off. His body was alive for about an hour but his mind was gone pretty much instantaneously.
    These men were two of the kindest guys you could ever ask for. I know that everybody says that about people after they're dead but in these two cases it's the honest truth. They are both sorely missed. I even named my son after them (Kyle Todd is his name).
    Honestly I was not scared before my first "action". It was after that that I was scared. I didn't really realize the danger until someone had tried to kill me. I always knew it was there, but it's not real until your life is tangibly threatened.
    The people there are for the most part pretty nice. At least to your face. We always joked about them being nice to our faces in the hopes of us giving them water or food and not roughing them up, then the next day they were shooting at us or blowing us up. In many cases this was true, but I believe that for the most part they're just regular people trying to get along in the world. I had contact with them on an almost daily basis and some of the individuals who we saw regularly were pretty cool.
    The first base that I was on our food was mostly MREs (Meals Ready to Eat) and they're basically prepackaged, crappy food. We also got leftovers from the Marine base down the road, but they never gave us their good leftovers (lobster) they gave us the shitty ones (spaghetti. I know it's good but it gets old). The second base that I was at had a civilian contracted company serve our food. It was a little better than Marine leftovers and they were mostly Koreans who worked for them, if I remember correctly. I was stationed in South Korea before I went to Iraq so my memory gets fuzzy sometimes.
    I was in Iraq for a year (well, 11 1/2 months). The first base that I was on had no women, but the second one did. For the most part they never left base while we went out every day and then they complained that they didn't get a combat badge. If there are any military women here sorry to step on your toes but that's just what I saw and heard while I was there.
    My name is Sergeant Christopher Tilstra and that's my story... haha. But in all seriousness, I think that I got all of your questions guys and if I missed anything or you have more questions feel free to ask.

    P.S. Sorry that it's so long.

    P.P.S. since returning from Iraq I've found out that some of my other friends have been killed. They were SSG Ryan Haupt, SGT William Sigua, SGT Joe Polo and SGT Robert Carr. Google will give sites for them all. Many more acquaintances of mine have passed, but the list is too long for me to recall all the names now.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    4,913
    Thanks
    130
    Thanked 200 Times in 123 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thank you so very much, Chris. that's an amazing story which moved me so very strongly. Sitting here and reading the words in total silence of early morning... all my people are still sleepy. it is Saturday.... well your words had a huge effect on me...so scary and simple: "he practically stood on it... the bomb and then ... his body lived for an hour after that but mind was gone immediately... so horrifying... so bitter.
    I read your story with an attention never scattered... you said it so sincerely and I know it is one of the most heart moving story I had listened. And it is about it in total...about Marine treated as elite and your heated old spaghetti, and two of the kindness people you saw gone in such a bitter way, and about little things like girl's complains about getting badge while not risking their life on filed. I was hoping it would be not official report but story of eye witness. So I'm very grateful...
    I want to hear more and more... hygiene in Army, what did you do in your free hours. video games sent from home? how letter from home felt? About what you thought living there... who were those local people who you dealt on daily basis... Men/women relationships in Army...about your commanders , without naming the names if you prefer it this way. About people, all types around you there... maybe just few words to give a taste of your life there...
    But it is if you have time for this. I'm very grateful... you should make this story heard by many more... an article or maybe even a book. You write very well too. simple words but they go straight to heart... I wish I could ask about your life before Army too... especially about drugs and how it starts for young boy you were... peer pressure or your own curiosity, your own decision... did you have all information about them, their effects and their consequences before you even tried? What do they give... because apparently they give something.... I think to be shamefully silent about those facts happening in our lives is worse... Information given is the best thing that works against mistakes and regrets.

    Thank you so much again and I hope and wish the best things to you... I believe we can make it through many things not allowing them to ruin us or make us insane... but I know we have limits and you saw such life changing things in front of you... wish you be strong, especially mentally and have confidence and see good in front of you. meaning in life...

    Last edited by sve; May 27th, 2007 at 01:52 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Beijing, China
    Posts
    2,258
    Thanks
    470
    Thanked 594 Times in 233 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Awesome.

    Sepulverture's Sketchbook Page 1 Page 19
    Sepulvertures Extended Studies Page 1
    page 2

    Tutorials Tips and Tricks needs you to stay alive!"
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • #28
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    808
    Thanks
    24
    Thanked 42 Times in 25 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    sve, thanks for your support. I will get around to these next questions but it seems like I'm always checking this at night and I'm tired so another time.
    I have thought about writing a book or something. I was deployed with the 506th Infantry Regiment whos WWII story was told in Band of Brothers but there is so much more to tell about this unit. Many heroes from this generation, not just from the "hero generation" of WWII. Perhaps another time.
    I realize now, after writing and reflecting on some of my experiences, how proud I am to have served alongside some of the men that were there with me. It is a feeling I had forgotten so I have to thank you for asking and getting me to reflect.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  • Members who have read this thread: 0

    There are no members to list at the moment.

    Bookmarks

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •  
    Art Workshop Discount Inside
    Log in
    Register

    Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
    The Art Department
    SpringOfSea's Sketchbook