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  1. #1
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    My first job and some money issues.

    Hey there. I searched around a bit, and I found plenty of money topics, but none were quite what I was looking for.

    Basicaly I just got out of art school. I accepted a few freelance comic art illustration projects. the pay wasn't amazing (especially with how slow I work T.T) But I hadn't planned on doing a lot of work for them. But now they seem very interested in having me do more stuff. Some pretty big projects. And they are talking about licensing, and royalties, and all that mess.

    The problem is, I'm a total industry noob. I'm sure they could take advantage of me quite easily. I don't have the slightest idea of how much I could/should make. Or how to figure that out. How to make sure I'm getting a fair deal, etc.

    how do I figure that junk out? How do I make sure I'm not getting ripped off?

    If it helps at all, Im doing 12x9 full color illustrations, usually single figure.


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  3. #2
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    How long do you take to finish the work? How much does it pay you? How much per hour is the result? Is that good enough? Will you pay the rent? Does it cover overhead? Materials?

  4. #3
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    Buy this book:
    My first job and some money issues.

    Pricing and Ethical Guidlines

    It has pay rates, sample contracts, everything.
    It's a very wise investment.
    - Dan Dos Santos
    www.dandossantos.com

  5. #4
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    ty, I'll pick it up.

    And I'm ashamed to say I have worked 100 hours or so on a $150 commission. (>.<* Oh I love being a perfectionist). But typicaly its about half that. Which still isn't good. Like 3 dollars an hour.

    I guess what Im having trouble with is, how much should the employer pay for my anal-retentiveness?

  6. #5
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    Ecronytpe

    You should definately look into the book DSIllustration advised.

    My very first job at doing art was a telecommute thing with some casino slot game company. It was an easy job and I "worked" 30 hours a week. Basically each day they gave me a number of tasks to do. Somedays I finished in 2 hours, and sometimes it took me 12.

    They paid me a flat rate of $13/hr for 30 hours a week (about $1,500/mon). And it was easy stuff. Slot machine icons (cherries, oranges, etc...), title screens, backgrounds, blah blah. This was my first, and only, freelance job (the job only lasted 3 months), so I didn't get too invovled with the legal technicalities. So don't take my advice on how much you should be getting paid, because I don't know exactly what you're doing. It *sounds* like, from my perspective, that you should be making at least, or most likely, MORE than $13 an hour. Or you can agree to a set monthly rate and hour/week (like I did) for whatever the amount it is you feel you should be paid.

    You also have to take into consideration how many hours you deserved to get paid for... and how many of those extra hours you volutnarily spent to make the art look better. If you worked 100 hours on a piece that they agreed to pay... lets say 30 hours for $13 an hour, that's up to you and your employer to decide if you'll be paid the extra 70 hours. It's kinda tricky.

    btw... great portfolio. Really nice backgrounds.

  7. #6
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    ty, I wish I could post some of the new stuff Ive done. But the employer bought first rights to it. So it will be a while.

    The freelance stuff I'm doing right now is per illustration and not per hour. I know I need to ask for more. Im just not sure how much more.

    Im gonna get that book, and hopefully that wll help with the pricing.

    But that still leaves me with the licensing issues (unless the book goes into that kind of stuff).

  8. #7
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    Figure out about how many hours it takes you to make an illustration of a particular size and complexity. Make up a chart of typical sizes, complexities, and times that your work falls into. Compute a price for each of those. And round up a bit. Your time is worth a lot more than you have been charging.
    I think you are awesome, and I wish you the best in your endeavors, but I am tired of repeating myself, I am very busy with my new baby, and I am no longer a regular participant here, so please do not contact me to ask for advice on your career or education. All of the advice that I have to offer can already be found in the following links. Thank you.

    Perspective 101, Concept Art 101, Games Industry info,Oil Paint info, Acrylic Paint info, my sketchbook.

  9. #8
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    lol. $150 in 100 hours = $1.50 an hour.

  10. #9
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    Also, pay attention to the use of the work you're going to produce. What kind of exposure does it get, etc. and refer to it in the GAG guideline book.

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