Art: the life painting Thread. - Page 13

View testimonialsView Artwork
Page 13 of 59 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 ... LastLast
Results 361 to 390 of 1770
  1. #361
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Oceanside, CA
    Posts
    195
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Originally posted by Bojee
    Doc was talking about temperature being about the relationship between the colors when they are next to each other
    Right.

    That's why I italicized realitive.

    Technically, you can do an entire painting in "blues" and still have a warm side and a cool side.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #362
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Posts
    338
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    So are we talking about relationships between colors next to each other, or are the mentioned colors always going to be the same tempertures? Can I say Ultramarina blue is always cool no matter what color it is next too. Indian Red is always warm, and Burnt Umber is always warm no matter what color it is next too. I know burnt umber mixed with white and placed over a warm skin tone makes a nice cool. Yet that is because white always makes a the color it is mixed with cooler, correct?

    I dont know the names of all the paints that I have I'm still learning them and their crazy names, sorry for the lack of better examples.

    EDIT: adding on

    So in theory we can say if we take two colors one color is always going to be cooler than the other. Like Indian red is warmer than burnt umber when next to each other. (it maybe the other way around, i really need to do more color charts)

    Last edited by nick reynolds; May 7th, 2004 at 07:11 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #363
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Posts
    338
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Technically, you can do an entire painting in "blues" and still have a warm side and a cool side.
    Ok i think i get it now.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #364
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Right here
    Posts
    44
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Re: Re: Lemon and Silver

    Originally posted by drdarrow
    Coro,

    The drawing is good, the painting is pretty good, the composition is below average, the lighting is boring, the background is moreso, and the glazing is cheating.

    Want a Photoshop manipulation to see some ideas? I'll be glad to...

    --Doc
    Glazing is cheating??? That is crazyness... Glazing is an art in itself...

    Sebsprek
    ----------------
    I know you... hahahaha!!!
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #365
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Oceanside, CA
    Posts
    195
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Re: Lemon and Silver

    Originally posted by SebSprek
    Glazing is cheating??? That is crazyness... Glazing is an art in itself...
    I know, but I was busting Coro's chops. He needs a little reducing every now and then.

    I can tell by Coro's work that he is used to achieving many of his colors by layering or glazing, but that he is attempting "direct" painting (mixing the colors that should be). The result is a mixing of styles, and misses the direct approach. It's a new skill to learn to mix the color you want, keeping it vibrant, and so I called it cheating, because in his case, it was.

    I admire good glazing, but it is often a crutch—I know, because I was an airbrush artist for two decades, and when I started painting, I couldn't make colors without transparent layers. I had to adopt (and learn) a whole new way of mixing, and learning the qualities and properties, and even the chemistries of individual tubes of paint.

    Every oil color acts, reacts and interacts differently. It's a lifetime education.

    You watch Coro. He is destined for direct painting greatness.

    --Doc

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #366
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Seattle,WA
    Posts
    3,269
    Thanks
    42
    Thanked 35 Times in 32 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    No doubt.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #367
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Austin TX
    Posts
    11,170
    Thanks
    2,087
    Thanked 11,251 Times in 2,790 Posts
    Follows
    2
    Following
    1
    Originally posted by MindCandyMan
    sparrow@20still@20life@202.jpg

    Sparrow Still life

    sparrow@20still@20life@202@20picture.jpg

    I don't have time right now but I need to come back and read all these comments in the past couple pages...tons of fantastic info!!!

    Tag Coro...you're it
    MINDCANDY MINDCANDY MINDCANDY!!!!!

    hahahhaha....homie i am so proud of you. seeing your sparrow painting was the highlight of my entire day.


    J

    Last edited by emily g; June 19th, 2007 at 04:04 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #368
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Right here
    Posts
    44
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Re: Re: Lemon and Silver

    Originally posted by drdarrow


    I know, but I was busting Coro's chops. He needs a little reducing every now and then.

    I can tell by Coro's work that he is used to achieving many of his colors by layering or glazing, but that he is attempting "direct" painting (mixing the colors that should be). The result is a mixing of styles, and misses the direct approach. It's a new skill to learn to mix the color you want, keeping it vibrant, and so I called it cheating, because in his case, it was.

    I admire good glazing, but it is often a crutch—I know, because I was an airbrush artist for two decades, and when I started painting, I couldn't make colors without transparent layers. I had to adopt (and learn) a whole new way of mixing, and learning the qualities and properties, and even the chemistries of individual tubes of paint.

    Every oil color acts, reacts and interacts differently. It's a lifetime education.

    You watch Coro. He is destined for direct painting greatness.

    --Doc
    Okay... I take it back then...

    I know I definantely need to go back to direct painting... In some ways direct painting is a great basis for using glazing as an addition rather than a plan...

    I've decided to take a year off of painting... I'm only going to do drawing, and get my sense of value back up to par... I've strayed from applying good composition, having a focal point, dealing with edges, etc... My hope is that if I step away from my bad habits, I can start anew...

    Sebsprek
    ----------------
    I know you... hahahaha!!!
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #369
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Canada, Ontario
    Posts
    2,364
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #370
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Oceanside, CA
    Posts
    195
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Re: Re: Re: Lemon and Silver

    Originally posted by SebSprek
    I've decided to take a year off of painting...
    What a wasted year that will be.

    Well, no... drawing is critical, but if you don't paint, it will still take that much longer to develop your calligraphy.

    At the very least, have a stack of good books by your bed: Schmid, Harley Brown, Sorolla, Fechin, Rockwell, and Kruetz' "Problem Solving for Oil Painters" ... and put yourself to sleep every night reading, looking, discovering and imagining yourself painting.

    Then, while you work on drawing, you'll be absorbing good painting strokes, too, in your sleep.

    I'm not joking. I started painting in oils in December of 2000. Before that I didn't paint or draw for over two years after my divorce. (I couldn't do any good art -- I thought I was a has-been). But I read, and studied pictures by great artists, when I finally sat down to paint, as I picked up my brush and started mixing paints, I thought: I know I can do this.

    And a new painter was born.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. #371
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    san diego
    Posts
    498
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 491 Times in 13 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    coloridea2.jpg

    coloridea2.5.jpg

    Ok, part two got busy so I posted before and after...if you can read my writing, there are things in there that might be helpful.

    A counterpoint is an accent of some kind, either a color or a lighter value that illuminates or colors an entire area a brighter hue or value without having to paint the entire area that color.


    Since the face is primarily warm, to make sure the highlight sings, it is opposite in temperature, offsetting the warms, making the head less analogous in the painting...

    The accents are the other big deal, they are pure out of the tube dark value colors, ultramarine blue, alizeron, viridian...colors that start almost black. In little portions, the highlights and accents add the additional two values to the painting necessary to make it feel full value since we cannot go full value if you brighten the chroma.

    Anyway, the picture shows an observation to the two parts of each area of a surface so I can light it, or paint it correctly. The surfaces are 1. local color, the color of the object, 2. the color of the light source, or 3. the color of the indirect light source, and the same applies in the shadows. Local color + indirect light source or bounce light. THink of all objects being colored lights. These colored lights effect their neighboring surfaces, or color them up with their local color, regardless of whether it is in the light or in the shadow. Everything effects everything else. And as artists, we can take total advantage of that and heighten those colors, adding an additional beautiful aura of color to the atmosphere between objects, or forms in our painting.

    I love color...


    Ron the limes coming up.

    Last edited by emily g; June 19th, 2007 at 04:05 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. #372
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    san diego
    Posts
    498
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 491 Times in 13 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    MCM, a couple of dark accents in and under the bird, maybe in the wood slit above the bird to show more depth in that, and thin the string. ITs a nice work, did you site size this?

    Ron

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. #373
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    san diego
    Posts
    498
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 491 Times in 13 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Bojee, in the tutorials section here on the forums, I have a color theory tut. along with many others. But that might get some of what I am saying to stick a bit...maybe.

    limey.jpg

    here is the lime experiment. Trying to stay high in the chroma scale. This is how you might end up approaching these subjects, handling the theory of warm and cool of each color...

    Let me know what is confusing and I will clarify best that I can.

    Thanks,

    Ron

    Last edited by emily g; June 19th, 2007 at 04:05 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. #374
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Seattle,WA
    Posts
    3,269
    Thanks
    42
    Thanked 35 Times in 32 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by fredflickstone
    [B]
    A counterpoint is an accent of some kind, either a color or a lighter value that illuminates or colors an entire area a brighter hue or value without having to paint the entire area that color.

    Where does the accent come from?reflected light/color??

    Since the face is primarily warm, to make sure the highlight sings, it is opposite in temperature, offsetting the warms, making the head less analogous in the painting...
    analogous = Flat ??


    The figure diagram is a little harder to follow but with your words I'm starting to get it, a lot of this I've heard before it's just taking a little time to get used to some of the language your using in context to color, analogous for instance. I feel like I'm learning a whole new vocabulary.

    The lime/lemon diagrams are much easier and I'm going to try it. Is it best to have the object and the background as close as possible in color and temperature for this kind of experiment?

    I like the new additions to the figure by the way
    Doc's not the only funny guy around here.

    I've checked out the color theory tutorial but haven't spent enough time with it. I'll look again.
    Thanks

    Last edited by Bojee; May 8th, 2004 at 05:36 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  16. #375
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,170
    Thanks
    119
    Thanked 272 Times in 232 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Wow, this thread is really rockin!

    I'm a bit intimidated to post in here, especially since I don't have any life paintings yet to post, but I wanted to offer a few things.

    Bojee, I really like the way you paint. I think I see what you're reaching for, but I wonder if you could explain it in your own words? As you continue to develop, what do you want to see change and how? Do you feel that your work is cohesive enough? I ask because to me it seems a bit loud and crazy (as drdarrow already mentioned). I'm not sure if that's your intention, or if you hope to harmonize it more. Don't misunderstand, I'm not saying it sucks... I really do like it. Just trying to help cause I know you want to improve.

    I understand where drdarrow is coming from, as far as not really being able to help much since you're working in a different technique.... it's hard to teach what you don't know. My thinking on the subject is that, when trying to learn how to paint (even at the more advanced levels) it's best to stick with a more traditional/ realist approach, so everybody can see how close you're getting to what you want to achieve. Would you be willing to do some more realist stuff, that would probably be a lot easier for people to critique? And of course continue with your own style, in other paintings.

    I'm sure you're well aware of this, but I like to say it a lot. All the great painters, no matter how bizzare or abstract their work became, started out painting realistically, and got damn good at it before branching out into the modernist stuff. Look at Picasso's early work... incredibly beautiful and completely realist. It's the only way to really see your progress, and then take the lessons learned and apply them in your more avant garde work. I think there's a danger in working in a heavily stylized way before fully learning the principles of art.

    One thing I got from Loomis in a huge book at the school library (not one of the Heads&Figures books): He said it's important to unify your colors. One method he mentioned was by choosing one color as your basis and mixing some of it into every color you use. I don't know... maybe you're going for a more jarring effect with your wild color combinations, but I still think harmony would improve it. Not necessarily a traditional kind of harmony, but some way of making the colors play well together.

    "Figure drawing prepares you for painting at a high level" - Jeff Watts

    Sketchbook
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. #376
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Oceanside, CA
    Posts
    195
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Originally posted by Bojee
    analogous = Flat ??
    Ouch! That red against gray really makes my head spin.

    Someone take away Bojee's vbCode chart.

    Now, if that red lettering had, maybe a coolish transition, say, Alizarin, or ...

    ;-)

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  18. #377
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    York, PA
    Posts
    3,221
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 197 Times in 49 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    manley - Thanks bro hehe...glad I could make your day. Just trying to follow your advice and work from life

    fredflickstone - Thanks for the encouragement and critique Ron...this isn't sight size I'm proud to say hehe. I do a lot of sight size with my casts and such so when I get the chance to do something like this I always pass on sight size hehe. My teacher, in essence, brought up the same shortcomings (except about the slit above it which is a great idea). Do you think it was a product of not seeing the values correctly in real life or do I need to learn to embellish the right things?

    endregan - Thanks bro

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  19. #378
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Seattle,WA
    Posts
    3,269
    Thanks
    42
    Thanked 35 Times in 32 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Originally posted by drdarrow
    Ouch! That red against gray really makes my head spin.

    Someone take away Bojee's vbCode chart.

    Now, if that red lettering had, maybe a coolish transition, say, Alizarin, or ...

    ;-)
    Doc- your a funny guy, still reigning champion. I was just trying to break it up so ron got my questions as per your suggestion, it's been edited.

    Another bad color decision, I'm destined for failure.:p

    Last edited by Bojee; May 8th, 2004 at 08:43 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  20. #379
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    san diego
    Posts
    498
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 491 Times in 13 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    mcm-heh,. I am glad you know the shortcomings to sight size. Now give up the concept entirely and rely upon your hand/eye coordination to produce for you...sight size is a big training wheel that wont let go...bad habits from that sucker...


    The values you didnt see are a result of trying to see other things instead. You look to be conquering textures, and sometimes other elements such as value will toss off to the way side because we get to preoccupied with the others...

    It was a minor miss, and since you are still learning, I dont expect you to be bang on with everything yet, that is why you are still learning, to see what all you need to see through the eyes of others to develop those seeing things...heh

    Bojee-give me some questions...I didnt know you were not digi-color picker is a color tool in photoshop it grabs whatever you click on. Go to the color picker chart where your foreground and background colors are, and see what the color picker grabbed. It will tell you whether it was saturated or not, it will tell you the value of the color, etc. It is good for testing the eye. I can look at any color in a picture and know where on the color picker it will be. That is a result of good color theory knowledge...nothing more, not a gift. I know you will find the way, we just need to help lay it out for ya...

    Hit me up with your bag o questions and I will be more than happy to answer them. They are actually helping me piece together good tutorials for my classes...

    Ron

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  21. #380
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Seattle,WA
    Posts
    3,269
    Thanks
    42
    Thanked 35 Times in 32 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Ron - Ok I figured out where the color picker is and see the percentages, but how do you use that ?

    Value -that makes total sense,and is helpful.

    I'm not exactly sure how to use the color part. do you have it in CMYK, RGB? Use different ones for different things? I only have photoshop 5, does that make a difference?

    Also I asked a couple of other questions;

    Where does the accent come from?reflected light/color??

    and

    Analogous= Flat??

    These are about your demo.

    Thank you, I'm glad your getting something out of this cause I sure am.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  22. #381
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    san diego
    Posts
    498
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 491 Times in 13 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Color picker doesnt mattter what you work in. I use RGB so I have consistency, the little triangle with an exclamation point tells you when its not cmyk friendly...


    Analogous = flat in a painting because nature provides both warms and cools, and analogous is not that. It is about one color family, and that tends to flatten an image out. That is, analogous is all about all warm, or all cool or all red or all.etc

    The accents are the darkest marks in the shadows. THe accents are what develop volume in your shadows, otherwise the shadows tend to be one value and flat. The accent brings life and volume to it.


    The counterpoint of color comes from the true color of the object you are painting. THe wall is lit by the sun and sky, so most of the true color tends to get bleached out. It is up to us to find that color again so we dont paint in washed out tones. The wall can be painted the way we identify with it, possilby devoid of much color, and pick up the color on the edge of the shadows. This will give the entire wall the appearance of having more color on it than it really does.

    THe counterpoint is considered the other type of accent.


    Ron

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  23. #382
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Seattle,WA
    Posts
    3,269
    Thanks
    42
    Thanked 35 Times in 32 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Ron- Ok I think I'm with you,So how do you use the percentages you see in color picker, what are you looking for? Once you have that information what do you do with it?

    Sort of off subject but I think it relates; I was wondering if you could take some pictures of your pallete to show how it's laid out and why,what colors go where and why. do you have a big mixing surface?

    Also when your painting a subject, during the painting could you take pictures of your pallete and relate it to what's going on on the canvas, and then when your done show what's on your pallete and relate it to the finished piece. I think it would be really helpful to show the thought process and the color mixing to see the colors of your pallete side by side with the finished piece. Maybe have someone else take the pictures so your not distracted.

    Do you think that would work?

    Is that too much to ask? I know it's a lot of work.

    This is soo helpful. thank you

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  24. #383
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    san diego
    Posts
    498
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 491 Times in 13 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Not too much to ask, I just hope I can remember to do all that...

    The color picker is just a useful tool to judge whether your eye is tned...call out were a color might be ans see if you are right with it. If so, then you are well on your way to intuitively designing with color better...


    I will shoot images, I have two classes tomorrow to teach with paint, and I want to do a painting of my wife so somewhere in all those paintings I will shoot the palette. Till then, drum up more questions on the painting process, this is helpful to me to in the end.

    Ron

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  25. #384
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Seattle,WA
    Posts
    3,269
    Thanks
    42
    Thanked 35 Times in 32 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Ron- Awesome, Thanks!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  26. #385
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Seattle,WA
    Posts
    3,269
    Thanks
    42
    Thanked 35 Times in 32 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Ron- Another question; How do you determine what to tone your canvas before you begin to paint? Do you normally? Do you think it's a good idea? Is it based on temperature, color, or some other factor?

    I've heard of and have tried both burnt sienna ,and ultramarine blue and a few other colors. Burnt sienna relating to the warmth and color in the skin, and the blue because a lot of interior light has a blue tint to it, but I know not always . Do you have any thoughts on this?

    A little more than one but it's hard to stop once I get going. Thanks

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  27. #386
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    san diego
    Posts
    498
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 491 Times in 13 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Bojee-you could tone your canvas with anything really. It doesnt matter with what. There are some colors that work better than others, but its a situation to situation thing. Plein air is probably wise to tone with brown, since there will be so much blue and green in it. But, you can use purple, or aredder tone too. The one thing to try and avoid is a stain of a bright flourescent type color because it is so chromatic(strong) it masks the ability to clearly judge premixed values prior to application on the canvas.

    I personally dont tone the canvas, and I mix on a white surface so I can see my mixture the way it will appear on the canvas. THis is new to me as of Sebastian's training. Since chroma is the thing to achieve in my training,it is important to have a clean slate, i.e. white...nothing stands in the way of tempering the colors.

    The old masters would paint on a dark wood palette that matched the tone of the canvas they paint upon. The color of wood used for the palette was determined by the artists technique, and the color of that wood coordinated with the key color of the primer on the canvas...the tone, stain that would allow the modelling of value. Most of the time, it was a brown of some kind. This is where the expression brown palette school of thinking comes from. Prior to the impressionists, all painters except Velasquez and Frans Hal painted with a brown underpainting, and finished with brown shadows. Velasquez was the first to use the colors that really exist in those shadows, along with learn great impressionistic edges, great values, drawing, etc...

    IF I know I am going to work with a palette that requires I stain the canvas for the technique of the colors, then I will also change up my painting surface. I have 3 palettes of different colors for those occassions.

    Hope that answered your question.

    Ron

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  28. #387
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    san diego
    Posts
    498
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 491 Times in 13 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Bojee-are you going to the austin workshops for conceptart? I will be lecturing all this stuff out there and then some, and we can draw up, paint up all this stuff all day and night if you want till you get what you need from it. I am all for it, come on out...

    Anyway, back to painting.

    Ron

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  29. #388
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Seattle,WA
    Posts
    3,269
    Thanks
    42
    Thanked 35 Times in 32 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Ron- Awesome, I'm glad I asked, Have a great class/classes today.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  30. #389
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    York, PA
    Posts
    3,221
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 197 Times in 49 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Bojee-are you going to the austin workshops for conceptart? I will be lecturing all this stuff out there and then some, and we can draw up, paint up all this stuff all day and night if you want till you get what you need from it. I am all for it, come on out...

    SWEET!!!!! :eek:

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  31. #390
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Seattle,WA
    Posts
    3,269
    Thanks
    42
    Thanked 35 Times in 32 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Originally posted by fredflickstone
    Bojee-are you going to the austin workshops for conceptart? I will be lecturing all this stuff out there and then some, and we can draw up, paint up all this stuff all day and night if you want till you get what you need from it. I am all for it, come on out...

    Ron- Thank you so much, I don't think I'm going to be able to afford it, I'm going back to school in the Fall out in Baltimore and I have to save all my money for that.

    Ahh I feel bad now.

    Thank you so so much for that offer, Your help has been invaluable.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Page 13 of 59 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 ... LastLast

Members who have read this thread: 129

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook