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Thread: Painter X student version versus full version

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    Question Painter X student version versus full version

    Is there a functional difference between the student version and full version of Painter X? I qualify to get the student version, but I know some programs are limited in the student version.

    Should I get the student version or bite the bullet to get the full version?


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    It's my understanding the program itself is the same for either full or Education version.

    You won't get the hard copy user guide and you're not allowed to use the Education version for commercial work. You'll have to check with Corel to learn if there are any other differences, for instance limited time free technical support, etc.


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    I don't know where else to turn but here at other Corel Painter 10 User's Post. I'm a new user to Painter 10, just bought it today. I can't even install it? It is a brand new Toshiba laptop. But it was giving me some kind of error message regarding Invalid digital signature for a file in the program. Have anyone ever come across this? I just really want to get it install and start using it. It is a legit unopen store bought copy. And just my luck, it's Good Friday and Easter Weekend so there aren't any support. Please help. Thank you.

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    Hi kirin.....,

    See my response to your post in the other thread.

    Again,

    Good luck!


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    Please do not PM me with Painter questions. Instead, post them here where everyone can benefit from them. Thanks!

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    I own the academic version. If you go to buy.com you can get 10 dollars off of the total purchase using Google Checkout. So that's actually one of the best deals you can get if you're looking to own the program to learn it.

    http://www.buy.com/prod/corel-painte...204107801.html

    (Customer experience is that the shipping was really fast, I got it the next day so it was worth using that site)

    There is one noticeable difference between the Academic version and Full. The academic version's will show a Splash Prompt saying "Academic version"

    The other difference is the EULA (End User License Agreement) It requests that you do not make profit from the program. Since this is more learning hobby, not a problem. I also believe no Tech support is available according to said agreement.

    http://www.truetestmarketing.com/cor...-x-license.htm

    Buying the Educational edition vs downloading the full, means you get access to about 200mbs worth of extras, brushes, gradients, etc.

    One little note I don't think many people make mention of when purchasing this product, is that these are "Hand Made" basically assembled by people and I actually had someone who went crazy with the factory glue, which got on the CD and the sleeve it comes in. That meant it scratched though not to affect the CD (I moved it to another sleeve to protect it, and promptly created a backup) So when you get the box be careful.

    2nd Little Note: Beware of those "Factory Sealed" scams. I took a picture of the CDs to show that they're obviously pirated to show to some companies that these are being sold. You can register them, however, once you apply the update Corel figured out which were false and will deactivate the software.

    If anyone wants to see the photos let me know, because I'm reporting them on ebay and other sites they're showing up.
    Last edited by Arshes Nei; October 3rd, 2007 at 02:51 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arshes Nei View Post
    The other difference is the EULA (End User License Agreement) It requests that you do not make profit from the program. Since this is more learning hobby, not a problem. I also believe no Tech support is available according to said agreement.
    Doesn't that kinda defeat the purpose of paying for it?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Azeroth View Post
    Doesn't that kinda defeat the purpose of paying for it?
    Why would it defeat the purpose of paying for it? Do you make money off your Operating System that you have to pay for? There are a lot of programs out there that one may use as a hobbyist that one doesn't make money from. You're not making money off your video games, or dvds you watch. So why pay for it either?

    Art is a form of entertainment and I don't NEED the program to make art, but because I want to I'm going to go for the most reasonable cost. I'm not profiting from it, so the Educational Edition works fine. I enjoy the program and want to learn. Not to mention I'd like to have updates when the software goes buggy

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arshes Nei View Post
    Why would it defeat the purpose of paying for it? Do you make money off your Operating System that you have to pay for? There are a lot of programs out there that one may use as a hobbyist that one doesn't make money from. You're not making money off your video games, or dvds you watch. So why pay for it either?
    That's not the point. The point is that I have a right to profit from work that I create with the program, whether Corel wants me to or not. Imposing these restrictions on what I can and can't do with the software violates my rights as a consumer. If they're not going to provide me with something that allows me to exercise my rights, why should I give them my money in the first place? All I'm basically saying is that companies like Adobe, Corel, and Autodesk need to put up or shut up. If they can't provide a student version of their software that doesn't restrict any of the same rights that we, the consumers, would get with the full version, then don't bother making it at all.

    Think of it this way: Let's say you're in an art supply store, and there are some materials (ie brushes, paints, etc) that you really want, but are just too damn expensive. Then you notice that the store is offering a special student discount that allows you to purchase the exact same things for a lot cheaper. You're really happy about these savings, but then you find out that by taking advantage of this offer, you have to agree not to sell any work you create with the art supplies. Wouldn't you feel a little ripped off? I know I would, and I definitely wouldn't be so quick to give them my money if that were the case.

    It's the same thing here. What I do with any art-related projects I create with the software is none of Corel's business. The same way that if you were to sell a painting that you created using traditional media, companies like Golden or Windsor and Newton wouldn't start banging on your door asking for royalties. You already paid for their supplies; you don't owe them anything else. I'll admit it's a more complicated issue with intellectual property, but last I checked, copyright law only controls what you, the consumer, can do with the original creator's work. It does not give anybody control over what you create. If I create a digital illustration in Painter or Photoshop, it's MY work. My intellectual property. I may have used commercial software to create this work, but companies like Corel and Adobe have no legal authority to control what I do with my work.

    Art is a form of entertainment and I don't NEED the program to make art, but because I want to I'm going to go for the most reasonable cost. I'm not profiting from it, so the Educational Edition works fine. I enjoy the program and want to learn. Not to mention I'd like to have updates when the software goes buggy
    More power to you. But what happens when you become good enough---and experienced enough---to start doing it for a living? According to the EULA, you'd have to purchase the full version of the software. The way I see it, I'd be breaking the law either way, so I might as well do it in such a way that gives me the upper hand. As soon as I reach the level of a professional illustrator, I'll start using open source software, which doesn't impose restrictions on my rights as a consumer.

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    I have it. It's exactly the same as the normal version only you have no licence to sell your work. It's great for me!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Azeroth View Post
    That's not the point. The point is that I have a right to profit from work that I create with the program, whether Corel wants me to or not.
    Then buy the full retail version. End of story. You're using their software, you're under a LICENSE AGREEMENT. This is not a contract to "Do whatever the hell you want" You don't want to pay the retail, then don't buy it, you don't want to agree to the Academic version's restrictions, then don't agree and don't install/buy the program.

    You agree to it, you read the terms and conditions in purchasing the product. Not a big deal.

    If you want to really profit from it, the full retail version is not a big deal, you've earned your keep in buying the license/lease of the program.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arshes Nei View Post
    Then buy the full retail version. End of story. You're using their software, you're under a LICENSE AGREEMENT. This is not a contract to "Do whatever the hell you want" You don't want to pay the retail, then don't buy it, you don't want to agree to the Academic version's restrictions, then don't agree and don't install/buy the program.
    I shouldn't have to. As long as I'm a student, I should qualify for the academic version. Beyond that, Corel has no right to control what I do with work that I create. This isn't about their right to control what people do with their intellectual property; it's about them trying to control what we do with ours.

    You agree to it, you read the terms and conditions in purchasing the product. Not a big deal.
    Yes a big deal. License agreements have gone way over the line in terms of just how much control a software company has. It basically allows them to impose further restrictions than those set by standard copyright, and allows them to override exceptions granted by fair use. It's nothing but tyrannical BS.

    If you want to really profit from it, the full retail version is not a big deal, you've earned your keep in buying the license/lease of the program.
    This isn't about the retail version; it's about the academic version. There is absolutely no incentive for the consumers to pay for it if we become deprived of our rights in the process. I agree that it is ethical to legally purchase a piece of software if you intend to use it for commercial purposes; but if an academic version that allows you to do this does not exist, you might as well use a pirated version until it becomes necessary to purchase a license.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Azeroth View Post
    That's not the point. The point is that I have a right to profit from work that I create with the program, whether Corel wants me to or not.
    No, you do not have the right to use the program in ways not permitted by the license you agreed to when installing the program. In other words, you do not have the right to violate the license agreement that pertains to the Education version of Corel Painter.

    You do have the right to either not purchase the Education version of Corel Painter to begin with or to purchase the more expensive Corel Painter version that does allow you to use it for commercial work.

    Imposing these restrictions on what I can and can't do with the software violates my rights as a consumer.
    That's an absurd statement. You have no rights as a consumer to use a program in ways not allowed by the license agreement.

    Again, you do have the right as a consumer to use the program you purchase in all of the ways that program's license agreement allows.

    If they're not going to provide me with something that allows me to exercise my rights, why should I give them my money in the first place?
    The Education version of Corel Painter does allow you to exercise your rights.

    Whether you like it or not, using it for commercial work, is just not one of your rights.

    All I'm basically saying is that companies like Adobe, Corel, and Autodesk need to put up or shut up. If they can't provide a student version of their software that doesn't restrict any of the same rights that we, the consumers, would get with the full version, then don't bother making it at all.
    If software companies followed your proposed "solution", students would not be able to purchase software at a reduced price to use while learning. That would be a shame since most students do not have a lot of money to spend but still need the opportunity to learn. I'm very grateful for the Education versions of software I was able to purchase several years ago while enrolled full time at a local community college. I later upgraded to the full versions but while a student, the Education versions provided just what I needed at the time, and saved me a lot of money. Without that reduction in price, I would not have been able to purchase the software at all.

    Think of it this way: Let's say you're in an art supply store, and there are some materials (ie brushes, paints, etc) that you really want, but are just too damn expensive. Then you notice that the store is offering a special student discount that allows you to purchase the exact same things for a lot cheaper. You're really happy about these savings, but then you find out that by taking advantage of this offer, you have to agree not to sell any work you create with the art supplies. Wouldn't you feel a little ripped off? I know I would, and I definitely wouldn't be so quick to give them my money if that were the case.
    Why on earth would you feel "ripped off", when the store has given you a discount?

    Are you one who thinks the world owes you a living, perchance? It doesn't, and, as they say, there's no free lunch.

    It's the same thing here.
    The only "same thing here", is that you'll applying your misguided thinking to both the software program and the art store materials scenarios.

    In both cases, your thinking is way out of line with what is reasonable, legal, and realistic.

    What I do with any art-related projects I create with the software is none of Corel's business. The same way that if you were to sell a painting that you created using traditional media, companies like Golden or Windsor and Newton wouldn't start banging on your door asking for royalties. You already paid for their supplies; you don't owe them anything else. I'll admit it's a more complicated issue with intellectual property, but last I checked, copyright law only controls what you, the consumer, can do with the original creator's work. It does not give anybody control over what you create. If I create a digital illustration in Painter or Photoshop, it's MY work. My intellectual property. I may have used commercial software to create this work, but companies like Corel and Adobe have no legal authority to control what I do with my work.
    Software companies have not control, nor do they attempt to impose control, over what you create.

    Software companies licenses are what you pay for, what you agree to when installing the software, and what you are legally bound by.

    More power to you. But what happens when you become good enough---and experienced enough---to start doing it for a living? According to the EULA, you'd have to purchase the full version of the software. The way I see it, I'd be breaking the law either way, so I might as well do it in such a way that gives me the upper hand. As soon as I reach the level of a professional illustrator, I'll start using open source software, which doesn't impose restrictions on my rights as a consumer.
    Let's hope you, and others who think the way you do, will eventually mature to the point of realizing that copyrights and licenses are there to protect the copyright holders and companies/individuals who produce products. Without those protections, the copyright holders and companies/individuals who produce products lose revenue which they need to continue producing those products.

    If they are not able to continue producing those products, all of us who want to continue using them lose.

    Respect goes both ways, what we do affects others and what goes around comes around.

    Good luck with your growth toward being a mature and responsible human being!


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    Quote Originally Posted by Azeroth View Post

    This isn't about the retail version; it's about the academic version. There is absolutely no incentive for the consumers to pay for it if we become deprived of our rights in the process. I agree that it is ethical to legally purchase a piece of software if you intend to use it for commercial purposes; but if an academic version that allows you to do this does not exist, you might as well use a pirated version until it becomes necessary to purchase a license.
    You might want to think twice about advocating software piracy here, as people have been banned from the site for doing this.
    Please do not PM me with Painter questions. Instead, post them here where everyone can benefit from them. Thanks!

    Jinny Brown
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