Looking for a inspiring book for a ambitious boy

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  1. #1
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    Looking for a inspiring book for a ambitious boy

    Hello everybody
    I know a ten year old boy who is very interested in drawing all kinds of robots, dragons, dinosaurs, ect.
    He's a huge fan of all that stuff like walking with dinosaurs and various other movies.
    He loves to draw because that's how he can bring hes imagination down to pager and he's quite good at it.
    So I would like to give him a book as a present which will inspire and support him.
    But I don't know which one... Do you guys have any ideas?
    Please keep in mind that he's a kid... but quite good at drawing.
    Do you have any ideas which books could be interesting?
    A book which is both inspiring AND useful to learn how to draw would be best... but I have no idea if something like that exists.
    Anyway, it would be great if you guys could give me some tips.
    Thanks very much,
    Oliver

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  3. #2
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    [off topic]
    Not helpful to you whatsoever, but while he still has a strong imagination buy him language books. Russian or Chinese or something, he may not exactly learn to all too great an extent, but at least the foundation will be strongly cemented for when/if he decides to learn the language in more depth.

    I dunno if I'm correct on this, but the way I see it the ability to learn languages fades with your ability to have sentimental attachments to inanimate objects, etc. Words are just words, but it seems to be that you need to attach a meaning to these words (well, of course) and the way that this is generally done is through the 'sentimentallity' of it.

    For example Anya is a name, but if you know someone called Anya Anya is now that person. It's how sentences seem to make sense, despite they're just a string of sounds, which often even have abstract meanings. Such as the word 'often'.

    So uh, no help on drawing, but push him (not to hard though) into languages.
    [/off topic]

    Also maybe go into the references section of the photography forum and print off a few images from there. Especially from the deep-sea creatures thread, I'm sure he'll love that - all the adults here do at least. Maybe not necessarily for drawing from, but at least for wowing at.

    Last edited by Rhynome; March 2nd, 2007 at 03:48 AM.
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    i suggest books displaying or focusing on different types of art from different cultures. like chinese art, or ancient art, or contemporary styles. to expose him to many styles so he can choose what he likes and develop his own.

    but as far as specific 'how to' books on drawing?? well some good anatomy books will help him tremendously. Again there are many out there to just pick a specific one.

    i bought a book a while back that was semi-helpful to me.. its called '50 Robots to Draw and Paint'.

    http://www.amazon.com/Robots-Draw-Pa...e=UTF8&s=books

    its definitely a book for 'young minds'. give it a shot. and encourage the kid to keep drawing, and to draw anything he may see around him as well.. - JAG

    it's only after you've lost everything, that you're free to do anything..
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    any art section in a place like borders has ton of how to draw books for kids that age..like "how to draw fantasy monsters" or somthing like that.
    jag, exposing a kid to fine art from different cultures sounds great, but i think if someone handed me a book like that at age 10 id be pretty bored.

    Last edited by evidence; March 1st, 2007 at 07:46 PM.
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    There is a whole series of "How To Draw Manga" books that are both very trendy and good, serious resources. Just make sure you don't grab one of the adult-themed ones by mistake.

    I think you are awesome, and I wish you the best in your endeavors, but I am tired of repeating myself, I am very busy with my new baby, and I am no longer a regular participant here, so please do not contact me to ask for advice on your career or education. All of the advice that I have to offer can already be found in the following links. Thank you.

    Perspective 101, Concept Art 101, Games Industry info,Oil Paint info, Acrylic Paint info, my sketchbook.
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    heh, i hear ya. i usually just looked thru them for the noodie pictures, but accidentally learned a lot in the process - JAG

    it's only after you've lost everything, that you're free to do anything..
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    Give him a subscription to a weekend drawing class instead.
    Socializing + drawing = best motivation.

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    Give him something that would appeal to a 10 year old. Something "cool" about drawing robots, dinosaurs, superheroes and explosions. Bridgman is a little heavy for a 10 year old. Hogart on the other hand might be a little better. "Dynamic figure drawing" has a lot of nice big pictures full of action and motion: stuff that would look "cool" to a 10 year old. The reading can come later, but first get him hooked on all the cool pictures. My parents got me a series of books when i was a kid, called something like "the world around us" or something like that. It was like a lexicon for kids that explained lots of cool stuff and as a fairly bright kid that loved to read it learned me a TON of stuff that always impressed my teachers. I knew stuff like how the cloud/rain/river/sea/steam cycle and how plant photosyntesis works before i started school.

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    I got a lot of cartooning books as a kid (moslty Walter Foster collection) and I still have and love them. Books that show you how to start from basic shapes to build your character are great. And mediums! I started pastels and watercolor because I received them as presents, and markers and colored pencils and acrylics!

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    Here are some of my suggestions:

    How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way: It's old, but still in print and a great overall resource. I constantly had this book out from the library as a kid. The art is done by one of comic's great artists, John Buscema.

    Drawing and Painting Fantasy Monsters, by Kevin Walker: A relatively new book, and one I seriously would have loved as a kid. Good walkthroughs, interesting designs, and illustrated by several very well established fantasy artists (Kev Walker is one of my favorite artists, and does lots of work for the Magic card game, comics, etc).

    Like a previous poster, I recommend 50 Robots to Draw and Paint/50 Fantasy Vehicles to Draw and Paint. Both by Keith Thompson, these books are surprisingly well done and contain very imaginative, well-designed concepts. Some of them are a little scary, but I think a ten year old of today's generation could handle it.

    As he gets older consider exposing him to books by Bridgman, Hogarth, and Andrew Loomis. Finally, check out various "Art of" books from movies, like The World of Kong, various Star Wars books, etc. Hope this helps!

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    Quote Originally Posted by evidence
    any art section in a place like borders has ton of how to draw books for kids that age..like "how to draw fantasy monsters" or somthing like that.
    Just stay away from Christopher Hart and Lee Hammond and you should be fine.


    Tristan Elwell
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  13. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ploboyko
    Here are some of my suggestions:

    How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way: It's old, but still in print and a great overall resource. I constantly had this book out from the library as a kid. The art is done by one of comic's great artists, John Buscema.

    Drawing and Painting Fantasy Monsters, by Kevin Walker: A relatively new book, and one I seriously would have loved as a kid. Good walkthroughs, interesting designs, and illustrated by several very well established fantasy artists (Kev Walker is one of my favorite artists, and does lots of work for the Magic card game, comics, etc).

    Like a previous poster, I recommend 50 Robots to Draw and Paint/50 Fantasy Vehicles to Draw and Paint. Both by Keith Thompson, these books are surprisingly well done and contain very imaginative, well-designed concepts. Some of them are a little scary, but I think a ten year old of today's generation could handle it.

    As he gets older consider exposing him to books by Bridgman, Hogarth, and Andrew Loomis. Finally, check out various "Art of" books from movies, like The World of Kong, various Star Wars books, etc. Hope this helps!
    Quoted for emphasis. Fantasy Monsters and 50 Robots are two books that jumped into my head right away, and the Art of... books for King Kong, Lord of the Rings, and Star Wars have given me more inspiration than practically any other source. I'd also tentatively recommend some books by Wayne Barlowe, such as Barlowe's Guide to Extraterrestrials and Expedition. Those ignited my imagination as a kid and had a strong influence on my art. Stay away from his other books, though; they're awesome, but have nudity and grotesqueness. Another great creature book is The Wildlife of Star Wars by Terryl Whitlatch. These last books I mentioned are more inspiration than instruction, though.

    Quote Originally Posted by JAG.
    heh, i hear ya. i usually just looked thru them for the noodie pictures, but accidentally learned a lot in the process - JAG
    Ah, mammaries...I mean memories.

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    thanks very much everybody!
    That's exactly the information I was looking for.
    These books look nice, I think I will choose one of them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell
    Just stay away from Christopher Hart and Lee Hammond and you should be fine.
    Simply outstanding! I'm glad to hear that I'm not the only person who feels that way.

    I hope I'm not too late for a recommendation of my own..

    When I was ten, I picked up my first copy of Jack Hamm's Drawing the Head and Figure at a yard sale (my grandmother always seemed to drag me along to these things). Even now, I highly recommend this book to my students. Even though the stylings are dated, the construction techniques for the human figure used in this book are classic to this day.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Seedling
    There is a whole series of "How To Draw Manga" books that are both very trendy and good, serious resources. Just make sure you don't grab one of the adult-themed ones by mistake.
    I would disagree with you there Seedling... Generally your advice is on point, but I dont see how giving the kid these book would benefit in anyway other than adding a love for Deviantart in the long run and wonky anatomy drawing habits...But I absolutely detest those books.

    I would recommend Andrew Loomis' Fun with a Pencil, I think you can still find copies of this floating around the internet.

    Action Cartooning by Ben Caldwell is another good one.

    But generally stay away from the "How To" and Chris Hart stuff

    And possibly if he continues to enjoy drawing, step it up and get him some good anatomy books.

    Warrior Style

    The first rule of Warrior Style is, You do not stop drawing.
    The second rule of Warrior Style is, You DO NOT stop drawing.
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