Art: Decktilldawns's Drawing's and Paintings - Page 2
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  1. #31
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    Here's an update on some quick studies I've been working on this past week. The silver pitcher was painted in about 6-hours allaprima and the whole still life should be wrapped up in another 4 or so. With this one I primarily wanted to get away from depending on sight size and I kind of like the idea of being able to flip my eyes back and forth as I am painting. It reminds me of working from the nude comparatively.

    I'm really dissatisfied with the composition of the plein air study. I think I was just too anxious to paint and didn't think about it enough. Oh well, these are all things I need to learn.

    The bottom photo is of my little studio setup. Pretty cramped if you ask me! That's the easel I just finished building doing it's job.

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    -Jeremy Deck


    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14264...-h/14264-h.htm
    The Project Gutenberg eBook of The Practice & Science Of Drawing, by Harold Speed.
    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20165...-h/20165-h.htm
    Theory and Practice of Perspective, by G.A.Storey
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  2. #32
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    So you built that easel from scratch? Nice job! I've been using a tripod and a pochade box for life work in my studio setup... wishing I had a nice sturdy easel everytime I accidently kick a tripod leg- not a good thing when working sight-size! With regards to realism, when it comes to working loose or tight, I think you put it very well. In either approach, accuracy is still paramount- the level of finish is a personal choice. A poor start uncorrected won't be saved by any amount of polish, while mindlessy fencing with the canvas hoping it all turns out rarely produces anything worthwhile. I remember a friend of mine was let down when I recalled Sargent's sitter's accounts of how he painted. I think my friend expected that a loose style was born out of somesort of frantic urgency. He didn't seem to buy it when I told him that loose or tight, you still have to have a solid game plan.

    Last edited by thinairart; March 21st, 2007 at 05:51 PM.
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  3. #33
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    Fantastic work, your copies and cast drawing are outstanding. I think you have a real skill for painting too, I agree with what you write about style and execution. At the moment I have four artist who influence me the most and I will try and learn as much as I can. I think its very important to explore other styles and not become narrow minded, but equally its important to pursue what really drives you. Whatever route you decide to take in terms of style and finish, with the dedication you show in your work I'm sure you will be successful. I look forward to seeing more.

    All the best

    Tim

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  4. #34
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    Amazing stuff, especially for being primarily self-taught!

    Just wondering, but where did you go to High school in PA, assuming you went to High school in PA. I only ask because, I swear I've seen the painting of the Ketchup bottle before a couple of years ago when I was in high school at an art's festival in Berks County.

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  5. #35
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    reidaj- It really is nice not to have to steady my canvas with my left hand as I paint with my right. I was really sick of it, that and coming home to find a canvas laying face down on the floor... my old easel wasn't very good. We used to have a wood mill at our house (my mom lives in the woods) so I had tons of aged oak at my disposal so there was really no cost to build it.

    timmyhol-Thanks for your kindness and I'll be sure to keep up with my progress here. I want to see if it is possible to have this thread changed into a sketchbook thread. Would that be more appropriate?

    NeoGod- Hey, I'd like to thank you for stopping by. It sounds like you must have went to school in the Berks County area too. I graduated from Wilson in 03', so you must have seen that painting sometime that year. It placed first in a few high school competitions and was featured on some Local television show about the arts or something. It currently resides at the Berks County Intermediate Unit's main offices in their permanent collection. I'm psyched to hear that you remembered it.

    Here's an update on the peaches painting. It's still not finished but it's getting there. I did some work on the background, gradating it in value and also from warm to cool. I thought I would play with a a red/orange-blue/green double-complementary scheme. The blues and greens in the background didn't show as much as I would like because the photo was taken indoors with bad lighting. I hope to get an update in better light tomorrow. I also worked on the edges and the refracted light on the milk pourer, cast by the glass of the sugar bowl. I had to re-set up for the still life by digging out the items and arranging them as close to possible as I had it when I first painted it. I have since taken things down so it was tough getting things close to where they should be.

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    Last edited by DecktillDawn; March 28th, 2007 at 01:50 AM.
    -Jeremy Deck


    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14264...-h/14264-h.htm
    The Project Gutenberg eBook of The Practice & Science Of Drawing, by Harold Speed.
    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20165...-h/20165-h.htm
    Theory and Practice of Perspective, by G.A.Storey
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  6. #36
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    I hate to do this to you, but I liked the peaches much better without the gradation in the background. There was a monumental stillness and modernity to it that I would hate to see lost in favor of "classical" still life conventions.


    Tristan Elwell
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  7. #37
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    Haha, small world! I was a sophomore at Tulpehocken Highschool then and had some things entered in as well (best I got was an honorable mention for a sculpture), and I remember the piece because it just stuck out so much from the rest. And was happy to see that it had gotten a first place then.

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    It would be interesting to see what you would be doing in a couple of years.

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    Hey guys, I just finished a quick 3 hour portrait study and I thought I would post it. It was done with graphite on newsprint, so it is pretty rough. I plan on transferring to some stonehenge paper to do a good copy.

    I'm also posting an update on the silver pitcher still life. Just a few more hours to tie it together and finish the background.

    Elwell-thanks for the honest opinion, although I would like to get a good photo up so you can really decide.

    NeoGod- Damn, that is pretty close-by. What are you up to now? In school?

    Patdzon- I don't even know what I'll be doing tomorrow let alone years from now! I'm psyched to see what you'll be doing too, your work from life is really something.

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    Last edited by DecktillDawn; April 1st, 2007 at 10:28 PM.
    -Jeremy Deck


    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14264...-h/14264-h.htm
    The Project Gutenberg eBook of The Practice & Science Of Drawing, by Harold Speed.
    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20165...-h/20165-h.htm
    Theory and Practice of Perspective, by G.A.Storey
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    here's the pitcher

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    Last edited by DecktillDawn; April 2nd, 2007 at 03:16 AM.
    -Jeremy Deck


    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14264...-h/14264-h.htm
    The Project Gutenberg eBook of The Practice & Science Of Drawing, by Harold Speed.
    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20165...-h/20165-h.htm
    Theory and Practice of Perspective, by G.A.Storey
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    hey jeremy, your works looks awesome as always. one thing i noticed about the portrait though, is that all of your edges seem uniformly soft, i think that you should add a couple of hard ones to emphasize certain areas and give more variety, could be the picture though. keep it up!

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    Hey pancho, the photo is a little blurry because I took it in low-light so maybe some of my harder edges were lost there. I wasn't too worried about edge quality for this one anyways, because I took it to be a preparatory "cartoon" for a fully rendered drawing. I was mainly only concerned with likeness and accuracy in the larger planes of light and dark.

    I kind of got carried away did some rendering in the face...

    -Jeremy Deck


    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14264...-h/14264-h.htm
    The Project Gutenberg eBook of The Practice & Science Of Drawing, by Harold Speed.
    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20165...-h/20165-h.htm
    Theory and Practice of Perspective, by G.A.Storey
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  13. #43
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    Well here it is. My new still life setup. I finished my local color lay-in and have begun the actual "first painting" of the crock at the far left. You can tell because is is the only portion of the piece that does not appear to have sunk-in. Everything else is still in the Ebauche stage, roughly scrubbed on.

    I would like to know what everyone thinks of the composition, although I'm afraid that it is a little too late to do too much repositioning.


    By the way, I had begun this with my old easel closer to the wall behind it, with more of a sight-size proportion. When I built the new one, I had to move the work about 10-12 inches closer to me, so that is why the painting and the actual setup don't appear to be equal in size. I don't really mind though, because it challenges me a bit to keep checking my relative proportions, instead of relying solely on sight-size. Also the photo was taken from a lower perspective than my Point of Sight for the work to avoid glare in the photo so that accounts for the horizonal alignment problems you may be seeing.

    I would also like to note the "faceting" quality of my gradations over the forms, especially apparent in the freshly painted portion. This is something that Harold Speed mentions in his book in my signature. These "steps" can then be further refined or obliterated in subsequent layers but seem to be crucial to any rendering of a subject in high relief. It is also important to accurately establish these gradations over the larger forms before moving on to the smaller ones that overlie. You will notice this same posterization effect in many digital photographs.


    Anyways, cheers everyone.

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    Last edited by DecktillDawn; April 5th, 2007 at 03:46 AM.
    -Jeremy Deck


    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14264...-h/14264-h.htm
    The Project Gutenberg eBook of The Practice & Science Of Drawing, by Harold Speed.
    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20165...-h/20165-h.htm
    Theory and Practice of Perspective, by G.A.Storey
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  14. #44
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    Here's another detail showing the facets.

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    Last edited by DecktillDawn; April 5th, 2007 at 02:50 AM.
    -Jeremy Deck


    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14264...-h/14264-h.htm
    The Project Gutenberg eBook of The Practice & Science Of Drawing, by Harold Speed.
    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20165...-h/20165-h.htm
    Theory and Practice of Perspective, by G.A.Storey
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    I feel like your concentration on subtle gradations and coloring inside the lines is preventing you from pushing colors and really experimenting with understanding what your eyes are really seeing, not what you want them to see.

    I think a lack of color temperature is the biggest problem. Just from looking at the real objects in the photograph, there are fairly cool lights juxtaposed with hot shadows. For example, the cast shadow at the bottom of the yellow canister is a burning hot red-orange. You may find it less taxing to study color temperature on less amibitious canvas sizes.

    Compositionally I would have set the base of the table more than halfway to the top of the canvas, so that the top of the yellow canister is no more than 3-4 inches from the edge (the idea being a top-heavy composition counter-balancing bottom-heavy objects). I haven't played around with bottles or jugs much but arranging them seems like a difficult task

    ~ Stephen

    Last edited by darkwolfb87; April 5th, 2007 at 10:38 AM.
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  16. #46
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    Hey darkwolf, nice to see you stopped by. Yeah I'm really excited to paint the orange jug because of that intense red-orange that you are talking about. Burnt Sienna right out of the tube seems to be pretty close to this already. Anything but that far left jug that is still wet hasn't really been developed other than a quick rough approximation of hue,value, and chroma for the sake of the block-in.

    Even the brown jug that I just painted still lacks any bit of a cool highlight and remember that everything including color temperature is relative. Once the highlights have been painted in, the shadows will take on a much warmer appearance I believe. Also, the sunken-in quality is probably sucking the life out of everything that isn't wet, making the overall canvas seem much cooler.

    I agree with you about the composition, bringing the top in a bit. I can still crop it down which is a good thing. I was thinking about 3-4 inches away from that tall orange bottle too. I'll have to take it into photoshop to play with it.


    Quote Originally Posted by darkwolfb87
    I feel like your concentration on subtle gradations and coloring inside the lines is preventing you from pushing colors and really experimenting with understanding what your eyes are really seeing, not what you want them to see.
    Could you elaborate on this a little more, I'm not sure exactly what you mean. I am trying to approach this as objectively as possible, trying to paint "what I see" and not "what I think I see". What do you mean by "pushing colors" exactly? I am trying to hit the nail on the head with my judgment of hue,value, and intensity as much as possible with the facets and gradations. This is going to be presented to the academy and I am following their formula for still life painting as closely as I can. Also, there is a really good portion of "the Painter in Oil" by Mark Walker on still life painting and I am constantly referring back to that and the Speed book during breaks.

    -Jeremy Deck


    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14264...-h/14264-h.htm
    The Project Gutenberg eBook of The Practice & Science Of Drawing, by Harold Speed.
    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20165...-h/20165-h.htm
    Theory and Practice of Perspective, by G.A.Storey
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    I did a little digital copy of the jug in the photo. By pushing colors I mean pushing chroma; I saw traces of reds and yellows there so I put them in at a fairly high chroma to see what happened. I'm treating local color as a starting point, but there's way too many colors there to say one color is dominant. It's just a patch of colors to me. However, pushing colors this way has (so far) required lots of trial and error so it doesn't make sense to carefully construct gradations if the colors can be brought out more.

    ~ Stephen

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    Darkwolf, thanks a lot for taking the liberty to give an example again. These patches of color that make up the "mosaic" that you say that you see is taken into account when creating these facets. It is just an accurate and logical way to transition between each variation within. You say that there is too much variation in color to name a dominant hue, but that is not true. All variations of the local color are based off of a "staple" mixture with each passage leaning toward a different admixture of that same hue with another. I even recall Juan Martinez at the academy saying that even the color of the lips is really just a redder version of this staple flesh tint, whatever that may be.

    In my photo where it seems that I am off in hue, I plan on adding glazes to intensify the effect in some areas. Because of my amateur nature, I tend to make things greyer than I would prefer though I find this to be a not so much a problem right now. In subsequent layers of glazes or
    scumbles I can alter the hue and value to my liking, though I try to focus on value and an overall local color to lay a solid foundation. Someday I would like to move on to a more direct method. For the time being though, this is something that works for me and I am going to ride it out until I have enough confidence in my dexterity and eye to paint more freely.

    Here are two very quick studies I did from the sketches contained in a thread by a fellow member here, although his are way better. Some of his work is so beautiful that I can see myself doing tons of additional copies. Also, my graphite just doesn't give the same richness of tone without becoming "grainy" on the newsprint that the conte produces. I think I am going to draw both of these again after posting with some carbon pencils.

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    Last edited by DecktillDawn; April 8th, 2007 at 05:00 AM.
    -Jeremy Deck


    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14264...-h/14264-h.htm
    The Project Gutenberg eBook of The Practice & Science Of Drawing, by Harold Speed.
    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20165...-h/20165-h.htm
    Theory and Practice of Perspective, by G.A.Storey
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  19. #49
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    I was certain That I'd left a comment in your fantastic thread !? I guess it must've timed out, well Decktilldawn, I really appreacieate your thread and the disscussions going on in it I'll defintetly keep in eye on it and will try to leave more productive reply's in the future ,for now just wanted to drop in and say keep up the good work!

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    GREAT Bargues and even more impressive still lifes,
    do show us some more face and anatomy studies, I would
    love to see more of the human form on this thread
    aside that I'm really inspired by your oils!!

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  21. #51
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    vctr- Sorry to hear that your first post was deleted. I'm psyched to hear that you are along for the ride. I have a few things going right now that will keep me busy posting fairly regularly so stop back!

    maxetormer- I am actually working on a fully rendered portrait of my seven year old little sister and I hope to have a progress shot of that on here sometime in the next day or two. I actually drew for 13 hours straight last night (with a few breaks) but I am beat and should probably go sleep for a bit, lol.

    I just averaged it out and it seems that for this portrait will take about 2.85 hrs/sq. inch if it takes 100 hrs total at 5x7 which is the actual size. Considering the background will take about half the time that the face/subject takes to render, that means I am spending about 3-4 hours on a square inch. I csometimes wonder if I will always be able to work things to an academic level and still make a living at it. I suppose it is all in finding the right buyers for your work, and maybe even finding somewhat of a patronage to support such habbits. It makes sense that Millais stopped painting in his ever-so tedious pre-raphaelite style. He was reported to have said that, "It was no longer economical to work all day on an area no larger than a five-shilling piece." I though this was interesting to note.

    -Jeremy Deck


    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14264...-h/14264-h.htm
    The Project Gutenberg eBook of The Practice & Science Of Drawing, by Harold Speed.
    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20165...-h/20165-h.htm
    Theory and Practice of Perspective, by G.A.Storey
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  22. #52
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    I will definitely be checking in regularly! I'm excited to see some progress shots of the portrait you're currently working on, I'm Guessing its charcoal? well keep posting as you can

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    Thanks for the update. Your work is looking great as usual.

    For the still lifes, I assume you paint more directly, with some layering? If so what medium do you prefer to use? I've been oil painting for a little under a year, but at a traditional university, not an art school...so the instruction I get is sometimes vague.

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    4ntimatter is offline if a ghost went into the fog would he be mist? Level 2 Gladiator: Ordinarii
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    Amazing work, Your still life is of some of the highest standards around.

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    Wow this is just amazing - GREAT STUFF!! Love your rendering.. And that still life stuff just kicks ass!

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    hi. I want to thank you for the inspiration and say I like the addition of the gradation to the peaches still-life, even as I respect your observation that the photo doesn't match the actual colors. I definitely think the edges got better on the peaches. They read like the real fruit instead of plastic now. In general the gradation softened a kind of stark sterility informing the previous stage against the black ground.

    "Three's so little room for error."--Elwell
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