Jewelry maker (art clay PMC jewelry )
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Thread: Jewelry maker (art clay PMC jewelry )

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    Jewelry maker (art clay PMC jewelry )

    EDIT: check latest reply. I am looking for a place/person where I can send in self made designs in polymer/etc and have them casted professionally into atleast 3 jewelry pieces (preferably a silver material)


    (I hope this is in the right thread, never that sure)

    I'm looking for first hand experience and suggestions working with mentioned above.
    I've been wanting to have my pendant professionally casted but long story short: I gave up and until I find someone capable and willing to do it for under half a grand I decided to try myself with PMC. WHat I am mainly interested in is the term "clay". How is it to work with the clay? what is the consistence (compared to terra cotta, paperclay, fimo etc), how is it with the drying, the slow dry versus the classic? What can you generally recommend for someone who never had contact with the material?
    I have polymer/terra cotta experience and I own a kilning oven. I live in Switzerland which brings me to the next problem: do you know a place I can order PMC silverclay that will ship to Switzerland and that doesnt cost a hand and an arm? Generally a place that has an affordable price as I am a beginner and the ruined-it factor is kinda high.
    I did read around online what is officially described but nothing beats first hand experience.


    The pendant I would like to make is an advanced version of this oooold one:
    http://cathuman.com/art/mychain.jpeg this version was casted over etch in process with tin and is, you guessed, long since broken. Must not be with the stones, just the form rough.

    Thanks a lot in advance

    now, if it could only be possible I'd offer an online batch of muffins and tea for all your great advices that you keep giving here

    Last edited by Akeyla; March 5th, 2007 at 12:30 PM.
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    I don't know about art clay, but I do think there are companies through which you can have jewelry cast in silver for a whole lot less than $500. Do a google search on "lost wax process".

    I think you are awesome, and I wish you the best in your endeavors, but I am tired of repeating myself, I am very busy with my new baby, and I am no longer a regular participant here, so please do not contact me to ask for advice on your career or education. All of the advice that I have to offer can already be found in the following links. Thank you.

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    GarageBay9 is offline Human Resistance, Sanity-Maintenance Division Level 1 Gladiator: Andabatae
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    Warning in advance:

    The polymeric "silverclay" is not ideal for functioning jewelry, or anything that's going to see any kind of 'use'.

    It's much too close to pure silver once it's fired and the polymeric binder is cooked out.


    I made my wife's wedding band when we were in highschool, when I took a Materials Science class and we did lost-wax casting. I mixed copper in with the silver to make sterling silver. 6 years later, and it's still good as new.

    When we were finally married in August '06, she tried making one for me from the silver clay. It cracked while she was scuplting it, she managed to get it back together, and it lasted about another week or so before it fractured again into 3 pieces. She's going to rescuplt a new master and have the original melted and re-poured with some brass mixed in. (There have been plenty of Lord of the Rings jokes about 'reforging the One Ring')

    Pure silver is much too brittle for daily wear jewelry. If you want to make something other than a very delicate decorative piece, sculpt it from wax for a lost-wax investment casting. I suppose you could use another process to sculpt, but it has to be able to create a wax positive for the investment casting--and you have to keep the necessities of the casting process in mind when you're sculpting. The metal will have to pour and fill the mould successfully, remember, so lots of small thread-sized joints or chokepoints will cause problems, and you'll have to create feed-sprues past them that you remove later.

    There's bound to be a book or three at your nearby library. It'll have a better explination.

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    I know of the process and I also suggested it. I had a Fimo sample that was meant to be the sample of which a silicone/rubber cast could be done, then a wax cast and then classical procedure lost mold. The first caster said he needed a wax sample suited precisely for casting and he needed it custom made by another artist (which made 300$ wax ONLY, plus casting and silver then) and the other one said he could make it but it would be very flat and the design (I had etchings and like a second layer (http://www.akeyla.com/buttons/menulogo.gif) on it) would be gone. He was cheaper, only 100$.
    I did search online too but nothing useful came out really, yet. If you know an address/link I'd be very glad
    I made a lost mold myself with tin, but I had the wrong wax, a bad latex mold and a camping burner. The final looks close but... is a klutz. And its tin.
    thanks for the comment!

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    Quote Originally Posted by GarageBay9
    Warning in advance:

    The polymeric "silverclay" is not ideal for functioning jewelry, or anything that's going to see any kind of 'use'.

    It's much too close to pure silver once it's fired and the polymeric binder is cooked out.


    I made my wife's wedding band when we were in highschool, when I took a Materials Science class and we did lost-wax casting. I mixed copper in with the silver to make sterling silver. 6 years later, and it's still good as new.

    When we were finally married in August '06, she tried making one for me from the silver clay. It cracked while she was scuplting it, she managed to get it back together, and it lasted about another week or so before it fractured again into 3 pieces. She's going to rescuplt a new master and have the original melted and re-poured with some brass mixed in. (There have been plenty of Lord of the Rings jokes about 'reforging the One Ring')

    Pure silver is much too brittle for daily wear jewelry. If you want to make something other than a very delicate decorative piece, sculpt it from wax for a lost-wax investment casting. I suppose you could use another process to sculpt, but it has to be able to create a wax positive for the investment casting--and you have to keep the necessities of the casting process in mind when you're sculpting. The metal will have to pour and fill the mould successfully, remember, so lots of small thread-sized joints or chokepoints will cause problems, and you'll have to create feed-sprues past them that you remove later.

    There's bound to be a book or three at your nearby library. It'll have a better explination.
    thanks very much! thats exactly what I wanted to hear and what I feared about the material itself. Especially the cracking part.
    I know of lost wax and I wanted to have it done that way first. I tried myself with a tin sample and fully failed. I mean, ok, had a result but you cant call that a... jewelry. I tried giving my polymer sample to a caster to have first a rubber mold, then wax that one and then cast it. Because I have no real access to casting options and realistic materials where I am right now. I think I'd burn the house before I can get something reasonable
    ANd since the casters I asked (see post above) played along so nicely I thought of trying it with something closer and more realistic in my options:/
    thanks for the copper hint to, gonna apply that one to once I get any further. About how much copper part did you add?

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    because it really means very, very, very much to me and since PMC is out of quesiton:
    does anyone know a place where I can send a sample to have it casted? I have so far tried in USA (CA) but always got the wrong ones (read above).

    WHat I need: someone who can cast atleast 3 Versions in a durable jewelry material (preferably silver color) of a Fimo/polymer (or wax or whatever) sample that I will provide for something under 300$?
    I tried google but I kept ending with people who either did not do it or had premade forms for their casts.

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    Before you get any further into this, post your question and comments in the sculpting section. For the record, the heat-set plastic clays like fimo are for "originals" (one-of-a-kind) and wax (the proper type is easy to track down on google) versions are the type of thing used in jewelry production (lost wax).

    Oh, and you can't use a latex mold for lost wax. I got the impression that is what you were doing somewhere in all that verbage...

    I looked at the pendent you were trying to make. There is no reason why this couldn't be made from a two-piece mold with appropiate sprueing for all three copies you need at one time. Anyone who tells you otherwise is an idiot. Take your original, make a two-piece latex mold, and cast three wax versions that can be sprued together properly (this part needs some practical oversight from a pro--not something an amateur should attempt unless you like digging molten metal and shit out of your face when you do the final casting). A two-part CASTING mold is then made of the entire workup and you're ready for casting lost-wax.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ilaekae
    Before you get any further into this, post your question and comments in the sculpting section. For the record, the heat-set plastic clays like fimo are for "originals" (one-of-a-kind) and wax (the proper type is easy to track down on google) versions are the type of thing used in jewelry production (lost wax).

    Oh, and you can't use a latex mold for lost wax. I got the impression that is what you were doing somewhere in all that verbage...

    I looked at the pendent you were trying to make. There is no reason why this couldn't be made from a two-piece mold with appropiate sprueing for all three copies you need at one time. Anyone who tells you otherwise is an idiot. Take your original, make a two-piece latex mold, and cast three wax versions that can be sprued together properly (this part needs some practical oversight from a pro--not something an amateur should attempt unless you like digging molten metal and shit out of your face when you do the final casting). A two-part CASTING mold is then made of the entire workup and you're ready for casting lost-wax.

    thanks very much!
    I'll go ask on the sculpting forum
    and, just to be sure you didnt misunderstand, I did not make a mold and casted into the latex, that would have been deadly I did make a wax sample in my try, but it did not work at all and I only got to fill it with tin. It did work to a certain degree but I want to have this jewelry pendant for as long as possible now. Meaning I wanted the mold to be as perfect and detailed as possible and the final to be of a good material and not camping burner melted stuff.

    The more people answer here the more I realize what wrong people I got . One of them said something about heat destroying the sample I sent. From what i hear here now (I first thought that it was another procedure as I only know lost wax) he seems to have... wanted to plaster it in and burn it out, the polymer sample... *facepalm*

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    Congratulations. You found a real live idiot. Feed him table scraps and crayolas and he'll be fun to have around for a long time...

    No position or belief, whether religious, political or social, is valid if one has to lie to support it.--Alj Mary

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    yayyy! new pet!
    now, first stop Vet's for a snip-snip. We dun want no lil ones. Its not like there's not enough of them.

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