Art: Quick Sargent study - Lady Agnew **UPDATED with another study
 
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    Quick Sargent study - Lady Agnew **UPDATED with another study

    A good sunday evenings work, for what its worth. 3 hours (with important Top Gear break ) oil on canvas, 11" x 11". I was going after colour chiefly, and attempting to paint in a pure alla prima way, hence the slight drawing errors. (Face too long etc etc)

    Click the image for a bigger-un + a bit about it!

    Quick Sargent study - Lady Agnew **UPDATED with another study

    And for what its worth, the process (Click it to be taken to better pics plus some description of the process):

    Quick Sargent study - Lady Agnew **UPDATED with another study


    Last edited by k4pka; February 28th, 2007 at 08:19 AM.
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    Wow that's fast! I like that, you captured the essence very good imo.
    Minor crit: that red on her lower left(our right) eyelid is a bit too strong.
    Anyhoo, how do you make it so that the underpainting doesn't interfere with the upper layers, especially the warms? I always end up with mud if I'm not extremely careful.

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    This is really nice. Thanks for all your efforts, the progress shots and description on your blog is fantastic!

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    It's a decent likeness, I'd have known who it was without the title.

    Last edited by Flake; February 23rd, 2007 at 11:25 AM.
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    Cheers guys.

    To answer some questions.

    The wash was placed with plenty of turps, and so by the time I had cleaned my palette for the real painting it was already dry. As such, this circumvented all the problems I may have had working into a wet ground. I didnt have to bear in mind a wet ground and change my colours accordingly or anything. I simply mixed the colour, and placed it in the right place (well almost!).

    Each area was finished to as high a level as possible before moving on, with only minor tweaking at the end when I could see the entire picture as a whole. I tried to lay the correct brush stroke and just leave it, but this isnt always possible, not at my skill level anyway.

    This is the exact method from which I work from life, and so yes it is very much applicable to that.

    Paint is used directly out the tube (W&N artists quality, except a couple of colours are Michael Harding) throughout the whole painting, except in the initial wash.

    As for the red under the eye being too red, I agree fully. Since shooting the pics, I cooled that somewhat in the real pic, after fresh eyes telling me the same thing! Cheers!

    Flake, nice to know, cheer

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    Sargeant's work is a school in itself. Nice.

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    "Just because something doesn't do what you planned it to do doesn't mean it's useless."-Thomas A. Edison

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  8. #7
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    A good sunday evenings work, for what its worth. 3 hours

    Well what can i tell you but the truth, i dont like to lie..I like the colors but just about it. Is good for 3 hours, and is good for what is worth..but if you spend 5 hours it will look a hell of a lot better and well imagine how long did it take Sargent...3 hours I dont think so..spend more time with it.. Nothing is easy if its well done..and yours my friend sorry to say..It is not..because you can easily tell your errors (the drawing ,proportion) so I dont understand the point of doing something if it will be wrong for I strive (and IM assuming you too) to do the correct things in life, is not all about painting is the overall attitude of life because remember that and artist life will reflect in his painting..and if you paint this quick, your life appears quick. So balance it out , take it easy and well your work and your brush will take it easy..just like Sargeant took it easy .

    my new site, is crazy stuff but is my own space, I can say whatever!! hehe:
    http://theallejo05.spaces.live.com/?_c02_owner=1
    One of the art schools I respect the most:
    http://www.mimsstudios.com/philosophy.htm
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    A good sunday evenings work, for what its worth. 3 hours

    Well what can i tell you but the truth, i dont like to lie..I like the colors but just about it. Is good for 3 hours, and is good for what is worth..but if you spend 5 hours it will look a hell of a lot better and well imagine how long did it take Sargent...3 hours I dont think so..spend more time with it.. Nothing is easy if its well done..and yours my friend sorry to say..It is not..because you can easily tell your errors (the drawing ,proportion) so I dont understand the point of doing something if it will be wrong for I strive (and IM assuming you too) to do the correct things in life, is not all about painting is the overall attitude of life because remember that and artist life will reflect in his painting..and if you paint this quick, your life appears quick. So balance it out , take it easy and well your work and your brush will take it easy..just like Sargeant took it easy .

    my new site, is crazy stuff but is my own space, I can say whatever!! hehe:
    http://theallejo05.spaces.live.com/?_c02_owner=1
    One of the art schools I respect the most:
    http://www.mimsstudios.com/philosophy.htm
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    Allejo, that was extremely inappropriate thing to say. The guy made just a quick study, theres no need to crit his "attitude", don't draw conclusions so fast.

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    v0rbiss, thanks for saying that. It crossed my mind too, but didn’t feel it was my place to say so.

    the_allejo05, I agree fully that it would look better with 5 hours done to it. However, being it was just a study (and has now sold) it was not worth my time to inject another two hours.

    I was after ONE thing with this entire piece. That was to study Sargent's use of colour, his warms and his cools. Nothing else mattered to me at all. The drawing got out of hand and became wrong. I noticed this, but didn’t want to invest time to correct it, because all I was intending to study was the colour. (At least the colouring here has been passed by your scrutinizing eye.)

    In the write up on my blog, I mentioned that I did not paint it the way Sargent is believed to have painted (again that was not my goal) and thus I can guess that he himself did not paint it in three hours.

    So I concur, it is not well done as there are errors, which I have acknowledged. However, the one area I strived to get right was colour. I know I have a good handle on drawing, I know I have a good handle on edges and value, however what I don’t yet have is a good handle on colour. Hence this study. Trying to do everything right in this case would have made studying the colour harder, and thus probably less successful. I break things down to learn them in manageable chunks. Eventually I will put them all together. Just not yet...

    About painting quick, and my life appearing quick... I haven't a clue what you mean by this, and so can't comment.

    That said, I appreciate your reply to my thread.

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    Nice job man!!

    Was wondering whats your palette for flesh tones?

    Thanks!

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    Heres another from last night. Again tried due to the flat lighting Sargent clearly used, and his very subtle temperature shifts that he is using to describe the form. These are tremendously educational for me: -

    Quick Sargent study - Lady Agnew **UPDATED with another study

    And again, some process shots for your perusal. These are on my blog, and I may add some description to each step if I can find the time: -

    Quick Sargent study - Lady Agnew **UPDATED with another study

    Mray: My palette for flesh tones is the same as the palette is use for anything else. The main components I have used in both of these studies, are titanium white, yellow ochre, terra rosa, burnt sienna, viridian, and cobalt blue.

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  14. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by the_allejo05
    A good sunday evenings work, for what its worth. 3 hours

    Well what can i tell you but the truth, i dont like to lie..I like the colors but just about it. Is good for 3 hours, and is good for what is worth..but if you spend 5 hours it will look a hell of a lot better and well imagine how long did it take Sargent...3 hours I dont think so..spend more time with it.. Nothing is easy if its well done..and yours my friend sorry to say..It is not..because you can easily tell your errors (the drawing ,proportion) so I dont understand the point of doing something if it will be wrong for I strive (and IM assuming you too) to do the correct things in life, is not all about painting is the overall attitude of life because remember that and artist life will reflect in his painting..and if you paint this quick, your life appears quick. So balance it out , take it easy and well your work and your brush will take it easy..just like Sargeant took it easy .
    I thought that this was a bit harsh, but then saw Allejo's sketches.....



    Quick Sargent study - Lady Agnew **UPDATED with another study


    Great studies greg, and I like your blog too! Keep it up!



    Allejo, maybe you should edit your words when you critique people, I have a feeling you mean well, but you really come off as being a bit harsh mate.

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