Art: Pencil rendering: Technique, Process, Materials, Discuss :)
 
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  1. #1
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    Lightbulb Pencil rendering: Technique, Process, Materials, Discuss :)

    Hey guys and gals,

    I thought it would be a good idea for us to exchange thoughts, ideas and processes of pencil rendering.
    I feel that "what pencil do you use?" is a pretty common question around these boards and I myself have asked this question quite frequently.

    I dont have much knowledge in terms of pencil termanology and even surface material to use so what makes a pencil hard or soft and what pencil goes best with what paper?
    I feel that the actual technique of how to render hasnt really been touched upon much, Its all very well understanding the placement of light but you also need to understand the process of applying these forms, directional shading, crosshatching, etc, Where on a surface would you apply cross hatching do need to apply cross hatching all the time, what order is the placement of light etc etc

    I think that these questions are abit up in the air really. I understand that alot of learning is through experimentation but I feel that it helps to have a basic understanding of such elements. So I would very much appreciate your help guys and gals, to help make this an educational thread for new and old.

    To start off I might as well tell you what im currently using at the moment. Right now Ive been testing out bristol board, Its a really smooth white paper and really nice to work on as its nice and fluid. I use a 0.5 2B mechanical pencil, though Im struggling to get many dark values with this pencil so I need to adjust, Not sure what to at the moment.

    Thanks

    And sorry if theres any rubbish gramma in there

    Rich

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  3. #2
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    Pencil leads are a combination of clay and graphite. The more clay in the mix the harder the lead and the fainter a mark it will make.

    The marks you make will help define texture, and directionality of those marks will help define form.

    If I'm doing a serious graphite work (not just a sketch), I will work on toned paper. The paper will be my midtone and I will work down from that to my darks. After those are laid in I will add highlights with conte.

    In my sketchbook obviously the white paper is my light, but I still work out from the middle by laying down my midtones first.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Man
    I feel that the actual technique of how to render hasnt really been touched upon much, Its all very well understanding the placement of light but you also need to understand the process of applying these forms, directional shading, crosshatching, etc, Where on a surface would you apply cross hatching do need to apply cross hatching all the time, what order is the placement of light etc etc
    For the specific techniques, it's largely a matter of preference and what is most practical at the moment.

    For example, I prefer solid shading. If you look through my sketchbook, you'll probably notice that my black and white drawings typically involve no more than two tones (black/white) and that I do not blend or use hatching.

    This is because I am strongly influenced by comics (I really like the dramatic rendering) and I specifically dislike the effect that blending produces (like with a tortillion, y'know? One of them paper stubs?). This does not mean that blending or hatching techniques are bad, that's just how I like to work.

    This also does not mean I never use other techniques. Like, if I want to fill in a blank area quickly, I'll use some form of hatching because it's much faster than applying a solid tone (that and I'm usually planning to go over it again). Or if I wanted to give something a less comic styled rendering, I might break out with some blending because though I don't much care for it, it is more realistic and it has its uses every now and then.

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    Hi,

    I work somewhat in the same way-- I like dramatic light, so I'll make it a b&w pen-and-ink-style drawing, and *then* go in with the midtone, and finally render all of it fully.

    Now, this is method is all of a sudden frustrating in painting --which I have only just begun-- because you cannot easily darken or lighten! You cannot simply lift off a shade with your kneaded eraser, or numerous brisk strokes to add a value; what you've put down needs to be fairly close. So maybe working out from a midtone will prove a good policy.




    -Bernard

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    This is great idea Mr Man, At the moment Ive been using an 0.5 HB mechanical pencil. It gives me many values to use on any given sketch.
    Ive been doing alot of figure sketches in a Strathmore Lightwieght acidfree sketchpad. I dont know alot about what pencil works better on which kind of paper, but an Hb works pretty well on lightweight.

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    pencil is very important..but drawing with pen will help you and force you to be more accurate,,it will teach you patience for each mark will mean something..with the pencil you can always get away..all the mediums help each other..but again the prevalence of ink is stronger..for with it you can create it strong dark shadows..look at nature there is black in it..is the absence of total light...

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    the_allejo05 Hey allejo, I agree totally with pen restricting you (for a good thing) I used to be totally addicted to ink and I kind of grew up using it as a kid. Im suprised how much I have changed though actually, I only really started to draw in pencil more the begining of last year and I havent touched pen in ages.
    The thing I loved about pen was the fluidity and movement of drawing the only trouble is I found it quite difficult to control my values unless I was dead careful. But with a pencil I had alot more freedom with my values, fortunatley for me I never use erasers too often so the spontenaity is still kept..ish. I think the thing that kepy me away from pencils was that I would always have some horrible grain in the way and I just couldnt control them. Later I realised that the paper I was using was shit and I was pretty much ignorant of what certain pencils could achieve. So im glad ive broken out of that shell and experimented more.

    Rich

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    This is a really good thread, thanks for creating it. I switch between the types of pencils I use, as well as the paper, I use a standard HB pencil, or a mechnical pencil with 0.5 HB lead, or a lead holder with either 2b or HB lead, and I usually draw in those standard black sketchbooks by Canson, or bristol paper, I like the bristol paper a lot more because of how smooth it is, and I really feel more fluid with it.

    But as far as shading techniques go, I'm not really good at that, I've been experimenting with hatching, taking influence from Marko and Wesley, they're two arists that really stand out to me when I think of pencils.

    Oh gee.
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    Hi all, Mr Man was kind enough to ask me to post some pencil drawings here. Most of these can be found in my sketchbooks and are kinda old, but i wanted to show some of the different ways of using a pencil. I suck at tuts, but hopefully the drawings will speak for themselves...or something When i get a little more time, i will try to scan some close-ups.
    Only real advice i have right now: Just draw, draw, draw

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    hi i'm a newbie here..
    i'm a long-time admirer of pencil art, it is very minimalist in nature. i follow very basic rules in pencil rendering, i use crosshatching and the linear technique.. in my humble opinion , in as much as the kind of pencil is important but the most important is the ability to control the press of pencil (which affects values; lightness and darkness) and the consistency of your strokes (which affects the tone quality ).
    very simple pencil drawing technique for newbies:
    - draw very lightly using 4H pencil, use 4H pencil for edges and sharp points
    - then use 2H pencil when u start shading, continue shading using blunt side of H pencil
    - for the dark areas, glaze using F-pencil......

    ninya

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    i really like my bic mechanical because of the sharp tip and great erasers, but for shading to get those black blacks i like ebony pencils. i like blended smooth shading, contore hatching ( not sure on the real name, when the hatching follows the form), the scribble technique, and this. http://conceptart.org/forums/attachm...1&d=1172929743

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    I honestly prefer using the actual drawing pencils. I generally start out a sketch in 4-6 h then lightly build it up until I hit my darkest at around 2 B. I may post a tutuorial in here or my sketchbook to show what I mean. It will be of the Two Satyrs Painting Master copy I will be doing.

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  15. #13
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    Aw thanks alot for posting fellah, thought Id lost this thread . Ill post some close ups of mine tonight to keep things rolling.

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  16. #14
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    Thanks a bunch jens, I remember seeing them around. Infact they were pretty much what inspired me to make this thread

    Heres a close up of my stuff. Nothing compared to you guys but I might as well contribute.

    I think I need to start using crosshatching. My pencil tends to go in one direction.

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