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  1. #1
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    drawdrawdraw ▌▌02/23 (pg. 76)

    NEW ART ON LAST PAGES

    ▌▌Scroll Down For Goodies ▌▌



    ▌You may hear me speak about God, Jesus, or of working in the church in some of my posts. I believe that Jesus died on the cross and rose again for my sins. If you have any questions or comments, feel free to PM me.

    If you do not believe in these things, I have no right to judge you. God loves you no matter what you've done. I believe what the Bible says, that we are all equal sinners in His eyes. Draw, draw, draw and be merry!

    Romans 12:18 (NKJV) "If it is possible, as much as depends on you, live peaceably with all men."


    My tutorial on how to fix grey scale export problem in Photoshop.

    A good art exercise:
    Originally posted by sourgasm
    put you hands together, palm to palm. place them directly in the center of your chest, with your back straight (prayer position). then touch your index fingers to the center of your chest and push your elbows out, moving your wrists out and away from your body. you should feel a burning tension in your wrist tendons. once that kicks in, hold it for 25 seconds. it forces blood through and stretches your tendons out. do that at least once an hour and it makes a huge difference.


    ▌▌CONTENTS:
    • Inspiration
    • Links



    ▌▌INSPIRATION

    Quote from the book Drawn To Life by Walt Stanchfield:
    Don’t be afraid to sketch in public places such as museums, parks restaurants, ect. And don’t let wind, rain, cold or heat deter you – those conditions sometimes yield the best sketching. Let someone else drive while traveling so you can draw. Capturing a scene while moving at high speed will sharpen your eye. But also take time to do a more detailed sketch. First draw a rectangle and work within that to force yourself to make a composition – relating one thing to another and to the borders. If you feel a need for toning the sketches, use cross hatch or carry a couple of gray felt tip pens. Get in the habit of using a pen. It is much more direct and does not rub off like a soft pencil. Sketch at home too. Never sit in front of the TV without a sketchpad on your lap. Sketch faces, figures, and stage settings. If your dog or cat is lying on the floor nearby, sketch them. Sports events are especially fun to sketch – boxing matches, football games, etc.

    You may shun landscapes – saying that you are interested only in figures or cartoons, but trees, mountains, rivers, and clouds have gestures that can be beneficial for analyzing action. Mountains stand erect, lean, lie down, sprawl, and spill out onto valleys in alluvial forms. Trees loom, twist in agonized or humorous gestures; they stand erect, stretch, and lean; some are tired, some perky; some bear fruit or flower, which in itself is a gesture. Even the atmosphere of a landscape has a (spatial) gesture.

    Vehicles have gestures of their own. Some cars seem to slink along, some move proudly. Some are raised way up on springs – like they’re holding up their skirts so they can cross a stream...

    That great teacher and the great guy, T. Hee, told his students to be like a sponge – soak up all the knowledge and information you can. Never allow yourself to get into a self-satisfied or complacent state. He advised never to drive home from work by the same streets twice. Take alternate routes – observe the new houses, trees gardens, etc., and do not just drive by them – look at them, see them.

    Whether your heart is set on the fine arts or on animation, quick sketching is the shortest route to training yourself for capturing those spontaneous gestures and poses that are so essential to good drawing. Break on of your bad habits today. Which one? The habit of not sketching...

    Also relative to drawing is the sharpening of your sense of dramatics and humor and of science and psychology. What are your reading habits? If they are narrow and limited, make a determined effort to expand them. Read a book on acting. Read a mystery; read a book on the life of Pissarro. Have a few books of The New Yorker cartoons in your library. Read Van Gogh’s Dear Theo. Read a few self-improvement books. Call 244-2816 once in a while.

    Listen to some jazz, some symphony, a string quintet, and some country music. Stop everything and just listen. There are some delightful Irish and Scottish recordings. Feel the leaves of a sycamore tree, a wad of cotton, a piece of sandpaper. Pick up a stone from the beach or from the mountains and fondle it. See if it has a message for you. Notice its color and texture – imagine doing a n abstract painting of it, or actually do it. Sharpen your senses in all ways. Life will open up its vistas of adventure and courage and venturesomeness. Then when you make a sketch you will feel and authoritative confidence flow into it. It will have the rhythms of the music you have heard, the drama of the books you have read, and the tactile influence of all the things you have touched.

    Sounds like a dream? No way! You have been given all these things, these possibilities, and for the small price of a few new habits…. who knows?
    Reply from Sammy:
    If your goal is entertainment then there could be no substitute for developing your own sense of design. And this will be mostly up to you, since there is no definition of design ... it's more of a muscle you try to keep bulking with your own thought experiments, theories, writing, brainstorming, meditation, whatever to remain as genuinely inspired as you possibly can.

    The bad news is that you have to have a library of stupid material junk at some points in your life..... don't ask, It's just something I've noticed among inspiring folks. A library, not only as in literature but any damn thing the humans can create with their minds or find with their hands. books, movies, games, art, music, science, history, mythology... a person can always strive to be a little more cultured, and all they have to do is follow their passions. We live in a time when you can youtube college lectures from your favorite dead scientists, or listen to a director give away all his/her secrets for two hours in some dvd commentary.
    Any artist alive stands on the shoulders of giants all the way back to paintings on cave walls. Biology that creates something from nothing, this gets curiouser curiouser - what exactly do you do with that torch?
    Keep the memory of the masters alive, they started this mess

    The good news is that it's actually really easy to demonstrate a sense of design in a portfolio. Yea it's vital to have some epic 80 hour polished illustration, but teams also want to see a sense of methodology. Showing the reasons you created the universes you did, that function the way they do. The sketches on the side, the orthographics, the 5 design overlays, the animation keyframes, thumbnails, reference style sheets, anything you can do to give insight into what catalysts you use to come up with the designs you do.
    Inspiration from Brad Rigney's (Cryptcrawler) mind and sketchbook:
    Originally Posted by TopSecret
    Amazingly clean! Im sure you have heard this a thousand times but nontheless your work is incredible, what takes a moment to look at was created through all this hard work and effort, I can feel the effort you put into them.

    On another note, id like to know how you went about actually self-learning yourself to this stage? Were you naturally an artist or? Any tips and tricks for us who are doing the same (self-teaching)?
    Observation, practice and a willingness to abandon myself to improving.
    This is all about time, all about practice and all about being teachable.
    You can train yourself to see your work for what it is instead of what you think it looks like, but its not easy and doesnt happen overnight.

    It also is something you have to practice on a daily basis and something you very well may not fully master.
    I certainly havent but im willing to hurt and try everyday.

    Before I (thankfully) became utterly swamped with contract work I did a lot of life-drawing and copying movie-stills for practice. On a low end week I draw 40 hours. On a normal week I draw 65 hours and on a crunch deadline ill work 85+ hours a week.

    It boils down to being in love with this and looking for excuses to do it whenever possible instead of making excuses not to.

    If you can do that and have 5% talent youll make it, I guarentee you.

    But make sure you have a realistic idea of what "making it" means.
    Currently im earning sub-poverty level income, but its getting better.

    For me "making it" means delivering my absolute best within the timetable ive been given, reguardless of who the client is and for how much.
    If I end up being worth a shit then the money will come, im not worried about that.
    The art is what matters most.

    I wish you all the very best in this, send me a note if you need to, it can get lonely and tough sometimes doing this when your broke, not eating a lot and socializing even less to get better.
    Stay on it, you can do it.
    ▌▌LINKS
    NOTE: I am going to log all of my important links; such as reference, books, etc here for my/your leisure.

    LINK CONTENTS:
    • Artists & Blogs
    • Photographers
    • Interviews
    • Books
    • Resource Sites
    • 3D
    • Tutorials
    • Music


    ▌▌Artists & Blogs


    ▌▌Photographers


    ▌▌Interviews


    ▌▌Books


    ▌▌Resource Sites


    ▌▌3D


    ▌▌Tutorials


    ▌▌Music


    Last edited by MattGamer; February 23rd, 2013 at 04:59 PM.
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  4. #2
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Great man! Looking forward to more stuff =)!!

keep it up =)

~Dile

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  • #3
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    Matt! New SB how fancy.
    The face in the Wood copy is good!
    Hope you have a sweet 2007 dude!

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  • #4
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    hey Matt, Youve really imporved, its great to see your being influenced by Ashley Wood, the mgs comics are good, although I reckon he overstylised Snake to the point of him losing his character.

    I hear your up for OC sometime, Ill add you to msn.

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  • #5
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    Happy new year! and good luck with ur new sketchbook will be lookin forward to seeing ya updates!

    oh love the guys face on the right ... and ur avatar cool too

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  • #6
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    Alright... bring on the work, happy new year! =D

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  • #7
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    Dile_: thank you and thanks for stopping by!
    j a k e: you too, nice seeing you here. ;]
    blanquish: sweet, I'm almost always up for OCing. i love Ashley's Snake, really inspiring though I would love to see another artist do the comics to get a different feel of it. thanks for coming.
    Razorb: thank you! the avatar is from my old sketchbook. cheers, and i hope to see you back. ;]
    Justin Oaksford: ok, you've given me a challenge. hehe, cheers!

    Here's a 15 min quickie of a scene from Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom. Oh, and a pencil rendering of Batman. Gotta love him. ;]

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  • #8
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    Ah batman is great Matt. I like him with longer bat ears though

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  • #9
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    Gotta agree with jake on this,
    I dig batman with long bat ears
    Good stuff in this sketchbook, keep going!

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  • #10
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    j a k e: hehe, as you requested here's the man with long ears. nice to see your checkin' up on me. ;]
    Thestjester: thanks mate! glad to see you here.

    I did Batman with short ears because he's much cooler that way. Haven't any of you seen Jim Lee's Batman? He's way cool with short ears! *sigh*

    EDIT: Battiemannie! :]

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    Last edited by MattGamer; February 2nd, 2007 at 02:07 AM.
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  • #11
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    Haha great dude. I like the little bats!

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  • #12
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    Woo New sketchbook!

    Love your stuff! I like how you did that speed painting from a scene from Indiana Jones, great economy of form and light.

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  • #13
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    hey matt, batman is good.
    WHen using pencil, your hatching seems a little too "choppy" to me. Generally its wise to use both soft rendering(going over, and over with a pencil), and hatching. Often the values arent realied enough with hatching, because the concern is with the form.
    I respect your targets quote, Jp is one helluvan artist

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