Palette Knife help?
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Palette Knife help?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    51
    Thanks
    33
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Palette Knife help?

    Hi all;

    I wish to paint something with a similiar texture and style as the Metal Gr. Novel;
    Pictures can be found here
    http://www.konami.jp/gs/game/mgs_dgn.../comic_01.html

    is the texutre (like the "dirty" and "dotted" areas) all done by hand? or it's an appropriate brush wish does the work?
    I see many painting with painter done in this style but I hardly know where to start

    any particular settings?

    any help or links to tutorials would be greatly appriciated; btw I have a Wacom intous 3 and painter 7 & 9

    thanks happy hol's

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    562
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    That looks like Ashley Wood's work, check out his blog for more work (http://ashleybambaland.blogspot.com/). I think for the most part he starts his work in traditional oils and then brings it in to PhotoShop if needed. But I could be wrong.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    California
    Posts
    2,089
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 197 Times in 170 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Hi,

    Using Painter, you can get similar textures to those seen in the example you posted.

    Use brush variants for which the Subcategory name contains the word "Grainy". That indicates the brush variant will interact with the currently selected Paper texture.

    To find out which brush variant use a Subcategory name containing the word "Grainy", open the Brush Controls' General palette (Painter IX) or the Brush Controls' General section (Painter 7) and read the Subcategory name.

    Some example brush categories that contain "Grainy" brush variants are:

    Artists' Oils (Painter IX, IX 9.1, and IX.5 only)
    Charcoal
    Chalk
    Colored Pencils
    Crayons
    Digital Watercolor (Painter 8, Painter IX, IX 9.1, and IX.5 only)
    Gouache
    Impasto
    Oil Pastels
    Pastels
    Pencils
    Sponges
    Sumi-e
    Tinting
    Watercolor

    In addition to Papers found in the default Painter IX and Painter 7 Papers libraries, if you have the Painter IX or Painter 7 CD's you'll find extra Paper libraries you can copy and paste into your Painter IX application/program folder or Painter 7 application/program folder, then load and use in either Painter version.

    To do that, go to the:

    Painter IX Papers palette menu and choose Open Library. Click the Load.... button, navigate to the Papers library file you want to load, highlight the file name, and click the Open button.

    Or...

    Painter 7 Art Materials, Papers section. Scroll to the bottom of the text list of Papers and click Load Library. Navigate to the Papers library file you want to load, highlight the file name, and click the Open button.

    If you don't have the Painter IX or Painter 7 CD's, there a loads of free textures you can download at:

    Mayang's Free Textures

    and....

    You can create your own Paper textures. Learn how by reading the following chapter in Painter IX Help > Help Topics:

    Textures, Patterns, and Weaves

    On the right panel, click the link named Using Paper Textures, then scroll down and read the sub section named Creating Paper Textures.


    Have fun, and Happy New Year!


    ........................

    Please do not PM me with Painter questions. Instead, post them here where everyone can benefit from them. Thanks!

    Jinny Brown
    Visit PixelAlley.com
    and The PainterFactory
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    51
    Thanks
    33
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    thanks for the replies - yes it seems its the same artist

    as for the textures i'm doing some experiments right now ^^

    thanks again guys and happy n.y too

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    California
    Posts
    2,089
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 197 Times in 170 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Hi again, Lee,

    Read my tutorial in the November 2006 issue of The Painter Canvas newsletter. It should help you with the basics: understanding, creating, and using Paper textures and brush variants that create the look of texture in Corel Painter IX (and earlier versions):

    Scratching the Surface: An Introduction to Textures in Corel® Painter™, by Jinny Brown

    ................

    Please do not PM me with Painter questions. Instead, post them here where everyone can benefit from them. Thanks!

    Jinny Brown
    Visit PixelAlley.com
    and The PainterFactory
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    51
    Thanks
    33
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Jin
    Hi again, Lee,

    Read my tutorial in the November 2006 issue of The Painter Canvas newsletter. It should help you with the basics: understanding, creating, and using Paper textures and brush variants that create the look of texture in Corel Painter IX (and earlier versions):

    Scratching the Surface: An Introduction to Textures in Corel® Painter™, by Jinny Brown

    ................

    Hi again Jin

    Thanks a looot with such valuable information; I really appriciate it;
    however, I cam across a new dilemma T_T

    I havent worked much with digital, but I used a lot of traditional Watercolors;
    with so, I used to build up tones/colors from light to dark with several passes of colors + drying;

    I was wondering whether with digital, one should work from dark > light or vice versa. I tried both with quite diff. results - Further more, my major concern is, whether one should use like... hmm 5 (or more) different tones to step up from the darkest to the lightest OR using just 2 tones with different % opacities; (first laying the darkest, then placing the lightest with several different opacities)

    I know there aren't rules for art, but what is the most likely technique 'taught' to blend colors? (apart from Painter's blending tools obv.)

    thanks again for ur patience

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    California
    Posts
    2,089
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 197 Times in 170 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Hi Lee,

    Painter artists work in so may ways, it's hard to say what's the "most likely" technique. Whether you choose to build from dark to light or light to dark will depend a lot on which brush variants you're using and where you're painting:
    • On a white Canvas
    • On a colored Canvas
    • On a transparent Layer
    • On a Layer containing existing color
    • The Layer's Composite Method
    • The colors you're using to paint


    If you're using Digital Watercolor or Watercolor brush variants, the brush strokes will be transparent and when painted above existing color, that existing color may be seen through the new brushstrokes and also be darkened depending on the color used on the upper Layer.

    Here's a demo to show you a couple of results depending on the method chosen:



    Note that in the top example, the Layer was automatically set to Composite Method Gel. That's necessary to result in the intended, transparent look for Digital Watercolor (and Watercolor). If the Layer is changed to Composite Method Default, you may see white edges around the brush strokes where they pass over underlying color. Of course white edges won't be visible above a white Canvas but they'll still be there and you'll see that if you close the Canvas' Eye icon.

    Again, there are so many ways to work in Painter it's hard to say what's the best method. It depends on what you want to do and the look you want to achieve. One thing new Painter users often don't realize is that we don't need to be restricted to using a particular brush category's variants, just because that brush category has a name like Oils, Pastels, Watercolor, etc. We can achieve the look we want by using brush variants from other categories.

    For instance, some artists say they paint smooth "watercolor" washes using Pastels variants. As long as the end result is achieved, it doesn't matter what brush variants are used to get there.

    You might want to read John Derry's Painter 8 Visual Guides to Water Color, Liquid Ink, Tinting, and Digital Water Color:

    Corel Painter 8 Tutorials

    On the Painter IX website Tips and Tutorials page, you'll find at least one tutorial related to Digital Watercolor, by Don Seegmiller, and possibly some more tips and tutorials that will help:

    Painter IX Tips and Tutorials

    Also, read The Painter Canvas newsletter issues from October 2004 through December 2006 where you'll find some good tips and tutorials that may help:

    The Painter Canvas October 2004 through October 2006 Issues

    The Painter Canvas November 2006 Issue

    The Painter Canvas November 2006 Issue

    Please do not PM me with Painter questions. Instead, post them here where everyone can benefit from them. Thanks!

    Jinny Brown
    Visit PixelAlley.com
    and The PainterFactory
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    51
    Thanks
    33
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    oh my!! *disheartened*

    ...I never knew Digital painting was so difficult and complex! (at least compared to traditional mediums)

    It is somewhat stimulating to have such a challenge, but on the other hand it seems such a looooong way before one can make something decent (I still need to learn all the functions) - I think I better get a good hold of the help section + those wonderfull links you just provided (I already learnt how to scratch the canvas

    However it is frustrating to see all those teenagers who easily draw digitally as if its nothing >_<

    ((P.S - I guess the average (absent) minded person like me should spend a huge amount of hours to get used to Painter...should I?))

    thanks again for ur precious replies

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    California
    Posts
    2,089
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 197 Times in 170 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Lee,

    Do not be disheartened! That's forbidden.

    It's true, Painter is a complex program ... and... it doesn't take long to begin having fun.

    Don't try to tackle it all at once. No one can and no one does. Just relax, pace yourself, and enjoy the process of learning.

    Really, you'll find yourself doing some nice things pretty quickly if you begin by working through some of the tutorials on the Corel site. They're not complicated and they can be quite satisfying to complete because you'll learn a little about the program with each one.

    As to spending a huge number of hours with Painter, you'll find yourself not wanting to stop. The more we learn the more Painter draws us in, discovering new things every day and losing ourselves in the process of exploration.

    I began with Painter 4 almost a dozen years ago and was hooked the first night it was installed. It's been a steady love affair all these years and though I've used Painter every day, year after year, I still discover new things frequently. It's soooo much fun!

    Don't worry about the teenagers. I'm a great grandmother and a lot of them ask me questions. They just seem extra smart because they've been around computers all their lives. You and I can learn just as well and have a whole lot more years of living to add to the experience. That helps!

    Spend as much time as you feel like spending with Painter, no more and no less.

    My favorite way to approach learing Painter is....

    PLAY!

    That's the very best way to learn because it removes the stress and we can't help but learn while we're playing.


    Happy New Year!

    .................

    Please do not PM me with Painter questions. Instead, post them here where everyone can benefit from them. Thanks!

    Jinny Brown
    Visit PixelAlley.com
    and The PainterFactory
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    51
    Thanks
    33
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Jin
    My favorite way to approach learing Painter is....

    PLAY!

    That's the very best way to learn because it removes the stress and we can't help but learn while we're playing.
    So true!! ...sometimes I forget this fact.
    I used to learn a lot when younger cause I enjoyed learning and figuring out new things; but today I end up wearing myself out and add pressure to myself as I want to grasp everything at one go; maybe cause i'm not that young anymore and hence want to become 'better' in no time. I tend to forget that everything needs time :/

    I once read a thread with a very debatable subject;
    "Talent vs Taught" - There were many replies but almost all agreed that the talented artist will always be ahead of the student who is taught, even if he/she works harder; I partially agree and not; because in my case I think i'm more of a slow learner (and tend to forget very easily)

    neways, enough whining - a new year has started and I'll try my best to practice with painter daily
    maybe someday i'll put up my own thread with painter pics

    cheers

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    California
    Posts
    2,089
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 197 Times in 170 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Hi Lee,

    Check your Private Messages. I just sent you a PM.

    Jin

    Please do not PM me with Painter questions. Instead, post them here where everyone can benefit from them. Thanks!

    Jinny Brown
    Visit PixelAlley.com
    and The PainterFactory
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •