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  1. #1
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    Exclamation Art Christmas List 2006 -URGENT-

    -Okay, tomorrow I am being picked up at school to go to an Art store and pretty much go on a small shopping spree- I would like to know what anyone would recommend in economical Easels (Top priority), everything I need dealing with Oil paints (recommended solvents, how large canister of solvents? Which colors are best to start with? Any specific types of brushes or will any cheapos do for practice?)-

    What kind of charcoal is a good "All purpose"?
    Anything else you would recommend??

    EDIT: And lights... Any recommendation for some lamps (the studio kind) would be good to, though I assume those are self-explanatory..


    Need to know by 6:30 AM EST! (7.5 hours from time of posting)-


    I also hope this thread will serve as a resource for other people looking to go have some art store fun, but have no particular direction. Hope this isn't too stupid of a thread.. it was just kind of sprung on me so I didn't have much time D:


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  3. #2
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    Justin
    see the thread(s) in workshop section by Whitaker and the one in there entitled supply list (or something like that) for your oil and brush Q's

  4. #3
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    just my opinion:

    easel: shannon studio easel.
    VERY good, very simple, about $100. cant beat it.

    oil paints: rembrandt.
    colors: (essentials) titanium white, ivory black, cadmium red, cadmium yellow, sap green, manganese pthalo blue.
    (if you can get more): burnt sienna, raw umber, cadmium yellow lemon, permanent yellow green, windsor & newton's alizarin crimson.

    mediums:
    oil: plain old linseed oil,
    solvent: turpenoid or gamsol

    brushes: bristle filberts (various sizes), synthetic filberts (various sizes)

    lights: go to home depot and get a good florescent fixture.
    philips "natural sunshine" florescent bulbs are super color accurate.

    good luck!
    - Dan Dos Santos
    www.dandossantos.com

  5. #4
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    to add and/or confuse:

    For brushes, I'd also grab some Rounds, small sizes if you plan to do detain work. I use the short handle watercolor rounds, make sure they have pristine points to them (not all splayed). Concerning bristle brushes: my first semester at school, I only had bristles. These are fine if you work thick and heavy, but I like to work thin and smooth. It was incredibly frustrating, just FYI. Get both bristle and sable/synthetic if you can and learn what feels good to you.

    A recomended pallet for one just learning oils: Titanium White, Ultramarine Blue, Yellow Ochre, Venetian Red.
    This is the most basic Earth pallet. It's very cheap and fairly user friendly. You won't get punchy saturation, but you will be able to learn the feel of the paint and should be able to get a reasonably wide color range. Just like a drummer doesn't start learning on a 33 piece kit, a begining painter doesn't need a huge pallet.

    I like Windsor Newton colors myself. Another thing that's just personal preference, what you get used to, etc.

    Also, you might pick up a glass pallet. It's super cool and easy to clean.

    Also, you might pick up some illustration board or heavy watercolor paper and Liquitex gesso. If so, you'll also nead a cheap house painting brush to apply the gesso. I recomend getting gesso regardles, because most any surface is going to need priming, but painting on paper is an economic way to get your feet wet, and way less trouble than stretching canvas.

    Dans lights suggestion is great, but I'll add: A simple solution is to pick up a few clip lights (basically just a socket with a reflector bowl around it and a big metal clip on the back to grab onto bookshelves, door frames, etc.) with high watt (like 100, not more than 150) natural balance bulbs. I use a combination of Philips Natural Light and garden variety incandescents, it's what I'm used to. All found at Home Depot.

    Have fun!

    edit: if you do get some paper and gesso to paint on, you should also have some masking tape and 3/16" foamcore to back it
    "Every little step considered one at a time is not terribly daunting" - Ethan Coen

    New books and process DVD available NOW!

    www.dvpalumbo.com

    Quickie blog (nudity)

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavePalumbo
    Also, you might pick up some illustration board or heavy watercolor paper and Liquitex gesso.
    good point.
    i see sooo many students get frustrated with their paintings,
    and its because they are painting on crappy canvas or worse, canvas board.

    the texture of canvas makes you thicken up the paint to get good results.
    thick paint = disaster for beginners.
    (it just gets muddy too easy)

    have a nice smooth surface, and build it up gradually.
    you wont get so frustrated.
    - Dan Dos Santos
    www.dandossantos.com

  7. #6
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    My favorite charcoals - General charcoal kit. Coming with an erazer.
    http://www.fineartstore.com/cgistore...rt_id=1831.244

    I bought a book about oil painting for the beginners. http://www.amazon.com/Painting-Oils-.../dp/0891346767
    and it has a lot of useful information.

    Author Louise DeMore recommends to have a large, white palette, at least 18''x24''. BTW she advices to arrange your paints on the pallete to make easy to reach, in certain order, in this case you don't have to search it for needed color.

    Her shopping list:

    Brushes:
    Filberts: one no.10, two no.8, two no.6, one no.4, one no.2.
    -----------------------------------
    Palette knife (useful for scraping unused paint off your palette and to scrape large areas on your painting)
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Very small painting knife, preferably with one inch blade (useful to scrape off small, unwanted passages or excess of paints. Tips of the kknives are very fragile and can bent, need to be handle with care or you will see unwanted marks on the surface)
    --------------------------------------------------

    Pre-stretched canvases, several 16''x20''. two 18x24'' or untempered Masonite
    prepared with three layers gesso or three-ply chipboard with gesso.
    She recommends to buy Liquitex gesso, three coats applied in order one after another when it is dried plus one more coat on the back to prevent warping. Third layer of Gesso can add some interesting textures depending how you applied it.
    You can use museum board too.
    The reason to add gesso it because other wise the surface absorbs too much of pigment and this might be expensive.
    ------------------------------------
    Sturdy easel
    ------------------------------
    paper towels
    ----------------------------
    Paints studio-size tubes (37 ml), white in a bigger tube,100ml.
    She doesn't recommend to buy beginner's set. Paints have too much oil, you need to squeeze them on absorbent paper to drain them and they don't behave correctly in mixtures.

    Colors:
    Cadmium Yellow light
    Cadmium red Light

    Alizarin Crimson
    French Ultramarine Blue
    Phthalo Blue

    Permanent Green Light
    Ivory Black
    Titanium White
    Yellow Ochre
    Burnt Sienna
    Cadmium Orange

    Very useful: Cerulean Blue (white in sky and flesh subtle tones)
    Cadmium yellow Lemon ( sunlight in cool paintings)
    Phthalo Red rose (intense cool red)
    --------------------------------------------------------
    18''x24'' palette
    -----------------------------------------
    Turpentine
    If you are very sensitive to it, she recommends Livos thinner (available through Natural Choice) It contains citrus peels and easier to tolerate. Be sure to buy Livos thinner , not Livos citrus thinner, the last one is too strong). it is expensive, but better for sensitive to turpentine people
    -------------------------------------------
    Small jar of linseed oil and small cup to hold it
    -----------------------------------------------------
    Can of retouch varnish spray
    -----------------------------------------
    Light (inexpensive clamp-on lamp with 200 watt bulb for start.)
    Last edited by sve; December 8th, 2006 at 01:38 PM.

  8. #7
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    Thanks for the list guys... though I had expected around a 200 dollar budget (seeing as how art stuff is expectedly expensive), I was only allowed around 50. I had intended to get pretty much oil painting stuff, an easel, and a drawing board, and possibly a moleskin. Because of the much smaller budget than thought, I just went with a large drawing board, a 5x9ish Moleskin, and a moleskin 3 pack (40 pages each.. really tiny). I was going to pick up Tony Ryder's book, but it was like 25 bucks (17 on Amazon I believe), so instead I just picked up one of those "Beginner" anatomy books that had some somewhat useful areas in it (for like 6 bucks). I also got an 8b pencil.

    They didn't have any brushpens either =[

  9. #8
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    Dude i would wait until you get more money, and go shopping again, 50 bucks is not enough to get some good oil painting stuff. Considering some tubes of oil paints range from 8 - 25 dollars.

  10. #9
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    Yeah, tell me about it. It isn't my money though- it's my grandmas. Thats why I expected to have more, noone told me til I got to the store..

  11. #10
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    Earth pallet, my man. All series 1
    "Every little step considered one at a time is not terribly daunting" - Ethan Coen

    New books and process DVD available NOW!

    www.dvpalumbo.com

    Quickie blog (nudity)

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