Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Cray-pas?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    In the boondocks currently
    Posts
    232
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Cray-pas?

    I went to Indigo Art Supply (my favorite art store in the area who is sadly closing their doors forever...) and I came across a box of cray-pas.

    I wanted to try using different mediums, and I decided to buy them and try them out.

    I was just wondering if anyone had used them before and had any tips on how to use them. Currently I am have problems blending...


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I last used them in high school, never really liked them. But my instructor said that they were a good medium to use before comitting my Oils to Canvas... and he was right. As an Oil based medium it gives you the "greasy" texture, but as far as blending goes, just get your fingers dirty (literally) the same way you would using charcoal on paper. I have yet to see anyone do a "professional" looking piece with them. Who knows you could be the first - Good luck.

  4. #3
    Ilaekae's Avatar
    Ilaekae is offline P.O.W.! Leader, Complete Idiot, Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Southwestern Pennsylvania
    Posts
    7,129
    Thanks
    8,241
    Thanked 5,581 Times in 1,789 Posts
    I've used them for years to do rough sketches with because they're cheap and I can imitate "painty" feel if I work small enough. They keep me from getting too anal with my drawings, which I do a lot...
    No position or belief, whether religious, political or social, is valid if one has to lie to support it.--Alj Mary

    Ironically, the concept of SIMPLICITY is most often misunderstood by simple-minded people. --Alj Mary

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    4,881
    Thanks
    285
    Thanked 1,452 Times in 259 Posts
    Here:

    http://conceptart.org/forums/showpos...5&postcount=55

    If this helps, you should poke ArtEdGradStudent and tell him to make a proper tutorial of this. ;-)
    I think you are awesome, and I wish you the best in your endeavors, but I am tired of repeating myself, I am very busy with my new baby, and I am no longer a regular participant here, so please do not contact me to ask for advice on your career or education. All of the advice that I have to offer can already be found in the following links. Thank you.

    Perspective 101, Concept Art 101, Games Industry info,Oil Paint info, Acrylic Paint info, my sketchbook.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    843
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 225 Times in 153 Posts
    Cray-Pas are made by Sakura (of Micron pen fame,) and was their first released product, being the first brand of manufactured oil pastels. They are made from a non-drying oil and paraffin wax, and some of the colors are dyes and not lightfast. You can thin or spread them with oil mediums or oil solvents. They're most effective when working in lighter shades to darker.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,202
    Thanks
    4,876
    Thanked 16,685 Times in 5,021 Posts
    Cray-pas are evil incarnate. You'd be better off with a nice sixty-four box of Crayolas.

    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    In the boondocks currently
    Posts
    232
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    heehee!
    Funny, after a few hours of testing my patience with them.... I figured that out.

    "Well freeze my piss if the royal finger isn't beckoning me. How exciting."

    "I am nature. you are art. Let us see how we compare."

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Hawaii
    Posts
    1,746
    Thanks
    23
    Thanked 56 Times in 14 Posts
    As with painting, try laying down large areas of color, and then working back in to get the detail. If you use a brush and some thinner you can blend them nicely, and get some pretty good details.

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Designed by The Coldest Water, we build the coldest best water bottles, ice packs and best pillows.