Sketchbook: Fledgling in the Making- Still trudging along.

Join 500,000+ Artists

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 64
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    50
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Fledgling in the Making- Still trudging along.

    Hi, I'm new to ConceptArt. I felt like participating in the community after having long been a lurker. My name's Heatherly, and I'm seventeen years old. I've loved art my entire life, but I want to improve my drawing skills for now.

    I feel like I'm struggling against gesture somehow. Any tips? o_o And please ignore the Spanish; I'm only in Spanish 1 right now.

    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by MaeAshley; June 8th, 2007 at 11:41 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    50
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I'll be posting my fundamental stuff soon. I need a lot of practice with that.

    Attached Images Attached Images                                              
    Last edited by MaeAshley; December 23rd, 2006 at 08:15 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    50
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Better quality than the other pictures? I don't have a scanner that works right now, so I'm using my digicam.

    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Irvine / CA
    Posts
    317
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Good start to your SB, and good to see that your starting out early, i wish i had started drawing back when i was 17.

    Start out small then work your way up to bigger tasks...Work on keeping your lines clean and not stratchy...

    Draw tons and tons from life, friends, objects, whatever it may be...train your eye to see whats there and not what you think is there....

    pick yourself up some anatomy books, loomis, bridgeman are good places too start

    but keep at it...dont get frustrated...and keep drawing! =)

    Warrior Style

    The first rule of Warrior Style is, You do not stop drawing.
    The second rule of Warrior Style is, You DO NOT stop drawing.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    50
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Here's what I did today.

    Attached Images Attached Images        
    Last edited by MaeAshley; December 23rd, 2006 at 08:09 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    50
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thanks, Act.Appalled. I'll keep what you said in mind. I'll grab the Loomis book from online and get started.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    50
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Sketches of friends and a teacher of mine.

    Attached Images Attached Images          
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    50
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I'm working on proportions from the Loomis book in my other sketchbook, so I'll take a picture of the pages later.

    Attached Images Attached Images        
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    50
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Man, I didn't realize that some of those dudes are leaning to the left.

    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Pasadena, CA
    Posts
    3,535
    Thanks
    236
    Thanked 307 Times in 195 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Some useful starting tips;

    Use as few lines as possible.

    When hatching- make sure you don't just "cross-hatch" like a teacher tells you to do- it completley flattens out a picture, totally defeating the intended illusion of 3D form (On a 2d surface.) Try to shade more "Along the forms' as it may be explained to you. If you imagine the wire-frame on a 3d model, and apply it to real life- your hatch marks should be parallel with those lines.

    Good luck!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    50
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Oaksford
    Some useful starting tips;

    Use as few lines as possible.

    When hatching- make sure you don't just "cross-hatch" like a teacher tells you to do- it completley flattens out a picture, totally defeating the intended illusion of 3D form (On a 2d surface.) Try to shade more "Along the forms' as it may be explained to you. If you imagine the wire-frame on a 3d model, and apply it to real life- your hatch marks should be parallel with those lines.

    Good luck!

    Ahh! It makes a lot more sense now, thank you.

    Here's what I did during school. Lot less gestures because I actually had to do work in the class. The pictures murdered the rendering of my hand, but there's not much that I can do.

    Attached Images Attached Images    
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    50
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Here's a more finished piece compared to what I've been posting. I need to work on faces!

    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Pasadena, CA
    Posts
    3,535
    Thanks
    236
    Thanked 307 Times in 195 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Just keep going til you get a scanner... then the real fun begins!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    50
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Yeah, really!

    My friends really enjoy getting drawn. O.o

    Attached Images Attached Images          
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    1,183
    Thanks
    55
    Thanked 198 Times in 116 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Some books to ask for this holiday season: George Bridgman's Complete Guide to Drawing From Life, Drawing Lessons From The Great Masters by Robert Beverly Hale, The Natural Way to Draw by Kimon Nicolaides.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Pasadena, CA
    Posts
    3,535
    Thanks
    236
    Thanked 307 Times in 195 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Actually I don't think The book by Hale will help you yet.. It's very analytical, and to really absorb anything besides the pics out of it you gotta comprehend most of what he says... Bridgman is pretty much an "Any level" book, it generally shows his fashion of "Massing the forms", an often used technique that allows you to remember muscle and skeletal masses simpler and easier. I haven't got Nicolaides' yet, but I would assume from what I have seen done from it, it too is an advanced book- though don't take my word for it.

    But definitley Yes on the bridgman, but maybe wait on the Hale book. In fact, Bridgman will help you to understand what Hale talks about- Alot of Form, anatomical landmarks, massing, directing the form in perspective, etc.
    In Hale's book, there really is no beginner section, and it isn't "How to draw a knee the Michelangelo way!"- It's more about showing the knowledge the Great masters had, and how you can use that information to supplement your own findings. A good beginner book though, is "Drawing on the RIght Side of the Brain" by Betty Edwards. It states alot of obvious things, but sometimes things you "know" need to be re-iterated for them to be forever impaled in your mind. It does a good job of that, so go for that one too.

    Dover Publishing has tons of 6 dollar books with TONS of plates from Sargent, Dore, Michelangelo, Da Vinci, Raphael- TONS of great artists. I would get a few of those to look at as well!

    Good luck!


    I am also curious why noboy else is really posting- you are doing a great job of updating and you aren't continually bumping your thread with "look at me!" posts like alot of noobies do. So far you are fitting in great, just keep listening, looking, and drawing!


    PS- My friends love getting drawn as well, they just hate putting in the VAST effort to Sit still for 30 minutes...

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  18. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    50
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    George Bridgman's Complete Guide to Drawing From Life
    Drawing Lessons From The Great Masters by Robert Beverly Hale
    The Natural Way to Draw by Kimon Nicolaides
    "Drawing on the RIght Side of the Brain" by Betty Edwards

    Dover Publishing has tons of 6 dollar books with TONS of plates from Sargent, Dore, Michelangelo, Da Vinci, Raphael- TONS of great artists. I would get a few of those to look at as well!
    Thanks to both of you guys for the book recommendations.

    I actually have some Bridgeman books and the Nicolaides book. Bad me for not using them. I had checked out "Drawing on the Right side of the Brain", so I'll try to get that one.

    I was thinking it was the picture quality, but that's probably just me. I dunno otherwise, so thanks for the comments! And will do on the listening, looking, and drawing! I try to be quick when I draw my friends, but I sometimes have to wait for them to move back anyway.

    Here's what I'm working on right now. I'll get to his face tomorrow if not later tonight.

    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by MaeAshley; December 7th, 2006 at 08:28 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  19. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Still in Florida
    Posts
    410
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Good progress I want to see face soon. Thanks for commenting on my page. Seventeen huh wish i started five yrs ago too.

    Critique, well I know digi camera but I'd be the first. I see your your shapes and I have to ask if they are sharing the same light source if not just ignore this next bit. The shadows cast by them it not quite proportion to the lighting and shadows dont share the same light source.


    Also I saw you turned that cat into an espeon (see Pokemon) I played that a loooong time ago.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  20. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Pasadena, CA
    Posts
    3,535
    Thanks
    236
    Thanked 307 Times in 195 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Honestly, I think right now you should focus on line-work and getting a decent handle on drawing from life using smooth and confident lines. Lines can describe form- although it is much tougher to do it without the help of value- But you should first do as best you can to get your lines to display form. Every so often I recommend doing value scales (12 boxes or so, spend about 2 hours on each dozen. Make sure to squint alot!).

    When I started out (I am going to post to an old sketchbook. DO NOT POST IN THIS SKETCHBOOK- FOR IT IS OLD. REPEAT: DO NOT POST IN THIS SKETCHBOOK.) Here is the link you SHOULD NOT POST IN:

    Anyways- there is SO MUCH useful advice I was given in that thread... when you have some free time, I recommend finding every post longer than 3 sentences and reading it... I started out approximatley where you were, so maybe you can absorb all that info without waiting for others to feed it to ya!!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  21. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    50
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    NicoRaven: Thanks for the comment. About the shapes, I had no clue how to make the cast shadows proportionate. I still have no clue, and I haven't found anything about it on the internet yet. I tried having the light source come from the top middle and act like the sun. The different circles are there because I had some trouble shading circles, so I copied some that I saw on one of the beginner threads here. That's the picture you're talking about, right? The shapes in perspective? And, yeah, I used to play Pokemon a lot when I was little. Nostalgia.

    Justin Oaksford: Yeah, that sounds like a good idea right now. I gotta start putting in a lot more hours into this and getting my homework done so I don't procrastinate. I remember seeing that thread. Thanks for linking me to it. Thanks for all the help you've been giving me. I really appreciate it.

    I took my time doing these. Took about two hours this morning for the whole page. I have all day to draw (stayed home from school), so I'll be posting later as well.

    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  22. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Pasadena, CA
    Posts
    3,535
    Thanks
    236
    Thanked 307 Times in 195 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Alrighty, let's see the stuff you did today then! =3

    The lines on the last are nice and smooth and confident. 2 hours? That's pretty long- but it's also a good thing you are that patient.

    (I'm not that patient.)

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  23. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    50
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Here's what I did yesterday and today combined.

    Attached Images Attached Images        
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  24. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    50
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Did a self portrait. Haven't done one of those in so long.

    Attached Images Attached Images      
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  25. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Still in Florida
    Posts
    410
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Good keep adding them up. Even if your line work doesn't immediately improve you should be able to interalize the anatomy better in your head. Then a 2 hr drawing will be 20 minutes and then 5 mins.

    Good work on the fundamentals. Nice poses.

    P.S. All in one scanner printer copiers on sale Walmart less than fiftie bucks. Then it will be clear crisp scans not flashed up digital images work we all can see.

    Listen to that Justin guy he has been where you are I hate him cause he is better than I but has good advice and such. Copy Paste his advice.......

    Peace

    TheRoad

    Transition from Art Critic to Artiste - Diligence, that's all I need.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  26. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    50
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thanks, NicoRaven. I'll take a look into that all in one scanner.

    Here are some blind contours and a figure from imagination that I did this morning before hitting the road to the doctor's.

    Attached Images Attached Images            
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  27. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Still in Florida
    Posts
    410
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Good to see your still working hard.

    Instead of Trying to draw a car try to build the car using 3dimensional shapes. You will find that you can create a 2d image that looks 3d on paper.

    TheRoad

    Transition from Art Critic to Artiste - Diligence, that's all I need.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  28. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    50
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I just recently bought "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain," so I hope to start working through that soon. I haven't done much lately because of make-up work and final exams next week.

    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  29. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Hello love!!!

    Awesome art!!! Can't wait to start posting some of my works daily.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  30. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    London
    Posts
    34
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    hi, one important thing (though it has nothing to do with your art itself) would be to improove the quality of the pictures you post. Sometimes it is realy hard to tell what's going on. if you take photographs of your work, make sure the lighting conditions are good, a tripod can also help a lot. Also if you take digital pictures and have access to software like photoshop you can alter contrast and brightness. In photoshop there's also a very handy feature called "auto levels" try it out (it can be found under image>adjustments>auto levels)

    good luck

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  31. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    50
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Oblivion: Thanks! I'd love to see what you do.

    Quote Originally Posted by farbtopf
    hi, one important thing (though it has nothing to do with your art itself) would be to improove the quality of the pictures you post. Sometimes it is realy hard to tell what's going on. if you take photographs of your work, make sure the lighting conditions are good, a tripod can also help a lot. Also if you take digital pictures and have access to software like photoshop you can alter contrast and brightness. In photoshop there's also a very handy feature called "auto levels" try it out (it can be found under image>adjustments>auto levels)

    good luck
    Thanks for your comment. Yeah, I know the pictures are really hard to see. I use a digi cam, and I have been editing everything in Photoshop 7.0 to the best of my ability. I try not to use the auto stuff because of all the dark gunk around the edges. But I'll start using it if it helps more than what I've been doing.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook