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  1. #157
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    hey man, good to see you studying so hard. the hands and feet are looking real good. ive been drawing out of "drawing the head and hands" by loomis. you should check it out. he teaches a pretty effective approach for constructing the head, and his hand drawings are good to learn from. studying and drawing hands in depth is time well spent because it encompasses every aspect and problem you find in figure drawing - gesture,structure,pose,thrust,form,etc. like e you said, next to the head they are the most expressive part of the human body.
    anyway, keep up the good work, and dont forget to have fun while you are working so hard on the anatomy stuff.

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  3. #158
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    good work on the feet and hand studies getting good with those. And I agree with Jim about taking a look at Loomis, I'm glad I brought two of his books back when I was a teen, it has helped a lot even though my construction isn't anywhere close to his, it did provided a good foundation.



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  4. #159
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    Hey BH,
    Your job does sound interesting, better than a crap retail job. And you are drawing!
    Working consistently on gaining confidence and eye/hand co-ordination really goes along way to better describing that intuition and inspiration. Your drawings begin to resemble closely the things in your minds' eye. I feel it is a necessary path to follow to allow the two to meet. It is a road I will never stop trodding.
    Good to see your enthusiasm with your studies. It's all mileage. So keep on drawing.

    P.S. Thanks for the words in my SB.

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  5. #160
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    Pascallo - well...feet are still a bit of a mystery

    jim b - Lol, yeah, I've got a .pdf of that in another tab of firefox...Hmmm very true, I think you've expressed explicitly what many people sense intuitively. As for my focus on 'anatomy stuff', well, one, I need an arbitrary but deep subject to focus on so I don't get bogged down on WHAT should I draw, and two, Its been suggested that anatomy, general anatomy, provides the broadest base in the artists' repertoire, since it underlies characters, creatures, and in the sense of organic rhythm, virtually everything else in a 'design' sense.

    Lee W - OMG! Are you now proclaiming yourself un-noobed?

    Hmmm ... sounds like you should oughtta dig that bad boy up an do some layouts with figgers...mmm?

    AztcFireFlower - heh, thanks. Well, aside from, or in addition to, what I said to Jim above, its, I dunno...more than confidence, I guess its discipline, and, eventually, technique. And of course the ability to render forms in space. I really am more inclined to environments and ...technology I suppose, than to humans/characters.

    But every time I think "enough of these figures! I see people every day and they're all basically the same!" (lol, or something like that) I end up falling flat on my face or getting lost in the 'concept stage' or just give up on a full-scale composition. This time I'm gonna build my house out of bricks.

    Alright, so, small update this week:

    A. proportions, views, from Goldstein:

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    B. Goldstein + Bammes (he really clarifies the shape of the Tibia nicely)

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    C. You just can't study the Borghese Gladiator enough ... you can't!

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    D. Feet from the Laocoon

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    yes, these are horribly disproportionate, sorry, just a bone map.

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    Now I got a better handle on the forms...

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    sketchbook...a kitten dies every time you don't comment

    “When forced to work within a strict framework,
    the imagination is taxed to its utmost – and will
    produce its richest ideas. Given total freedom,
    the work is likely to sprawl.”

    - TS Eliot


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  6. #161
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    Hey Bludhund,

    I see you`re still going full scale at the anatomy.
    Very nice however I think learning gestures should be your
    primary concern. Figure out Force before you draw Form.
    This made drawing a ton of fun for me. Although you wont find
    it in my SB. Havent updated it for a while. Anyway, drawing force
    and quick gestures is quite fun once you get a good purpose for it.

    Let it roll through your mind. Check out Drawing Force. find it on amazon.com for example. Or www.anamie.com simplified planning for animation. The last is a remarkable book by a very experienced draftsman.

    Have fun with it, cause there is nothing else. Might as well enjoy learning :]

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  7. #162
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    Hey Bludhund thanks for the great critique in my sb! and yes i will be seeing you in Seattle this upcoming January. Great anatomy stuff going on here i think i'll try my hand at some anatomy tonight!! anyhow keep going with the anatomy!!
    and try to draw what you are learning from memory it helped me immensely!! Anyhow keep up the great work!! and the force book is a great buy especially when you start trying to conceive poses directly from you mind. Something that will help when you start posing is the mirror. I myself keep forgetting to go feel the pose and see what the body is doing that helps a ton as well. Anyhow you are working extremely hard keep it up and see you soon.

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  8. #163
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    Love the studies Blud....see you in Revelations!

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  9. #164
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    The studies look pretty good, there's a good mix of aproaches. Keep the constructive type drawings to a minimum, the type where you start with a box and then divide from the box. Couple of problems with that approach: the box you start with is just a guess, it's theoretically impossible to draw a perfect cube from the mind, so it's not a good reference. Another issue I have with it is it's artificiality, supposedly it helps us understand 3D space but I'd gotten around just fine for years before I learned perspective, I didn't need it to understand space. Just my thoughts, take em or leave em.

    Another important thing I noticed is that you're little gesture guys are looking good, they are articulated wholes, all the parts interact with the other parts, and reinforce the gestures/movements/intentions of the other parts. But then on the slower, more part specific studies things aren't held together so well, fingers bare vague relations to palms, wrists, and arms.
    If you look at trees you can see the concept of growth clearly. The trunk rises from the ground and the branches continue that motion upward and outward, there function being to grow towards the light.

    You'll notice this concept of growth on the body too, each body part carries the momentum of the part it's connected to, they are related. In a well drawn study of a hand it's possible to infer where the forearm is, up into the shoulder, and then into the rest of the body. The body is what's important even in single part studies, having all the parts connect to form a body is the goal.

    Joints function as junctions where the movement of one part is transferred into another. The wrist belongs neither fully to the hand or forearm, it's independence is needed to hold the two forms together, as well as to logically explain the change in direction. Pronounced changes in direction happen in 3 dimensional movement, cross contours are need to explain that movement otherwise the figure can look distorted, broken, or whatever.

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  10. #165
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    Banshax - yeah I own a copy of Mattesi's book, if that's what you mean. Maybe I just have a hard time grasping force abstractly without having a good framework to place it on, but I found it difficult to extrapolate into my work so far. The other thing is that I often lack a good source of inspiration to work on gestures, whereas learning atanomy is something that I can just keep plugging away at regardless. The other thing, too, is that I am not really looking at an animation-oriented career, for me at least, form, the invention of unique form, tends to trump other factors.

    Ashrumm - yeah I should try acting out more of the poses I draw. And yes definitely I am constantly trying to reiterate from memory, testing to see where the gaps are in my knowledge.

    armando - thanks for the mark-up.

    As for constructive drawing ... I guess I am trying to remind myself of the proportional guidelines, also of course it helps with layout. I find that more often when I just start laying in marks and 'feel my way' I quickly run astray. A major problem I am struggling with right now is that I just don't have the time to keep up the tempo in my studies ... nothing is meshing and I keep forgetting all my little observations. Maybe I should work on some flashcards

    I heartily agree about the need to relate each part to the other parts and to the whole. Certainly as it applies to organic forms I must try to obey this principle.

    Sorry its been like two and a half weeks guys, but its been a madhouse around here, plus I got stricken with the art-doldrums so I didn't really have anything to post last week. Fortunately the 4-day thanksgiving weekend allowed me to really sit down and get myself back on track.

    So some review

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    Wrists

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    just to show you guys that all your advice and crits don't just sail over my head ... at this point I started really wrestling with whether I am on the right track or if I should change gears

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    And the main subject: forearms

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    some figures, to keep from getting to bogged down

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    Last edited by BludHund; November 28th, 2007 at 05:33 PM.
    sketchbook...a kitten dies every time you don't comment

    “When forced to work within a strict framework,
    the imagination is taxed to its utmost – and will
    produce its richest ideas. Given total freedom,
    the work is likely to sprawl.”

    - TS Eliot


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  11. #166
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    I know what you mean about forgetting various little details that you study. Still I think all this technical anatomy study is necessary in the beginning, if you don't have a teacher, it shows you what your limits are: what you can remember; and you find out what type of thinking you lean towards, how much stuff you can feel your way around, what generic constructive tricks are useful and which aren't. Eventually you reach your limit and just say fuck it, that's what I did, but I suppose some people can stick with it for their whole lives like Mentler, it's something you'll learn in time.
    Note your reactions when you're looking at things, what do you notice first about something or someone, the color, some specific attribute, the shape, the feeling you get when looking at it, I doubt it's the construction and perspective. That's my tip, find out what's important, then find a method that addresses that at once .

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    "Knowledge is proven in action."
    "It's use is it's meaning."
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  12. #167
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    Something that is fun becomes work when too much effort is put into doing it and what feels like work is never a good motivator. You are doing too much technical studying and it is consuming your will. Forget about studying for a while, just let your mind loose and sketch without using any construction lines, don't worry about whether it is right or wrong, there is plenty of time afterwards to analyze it then figure what is right or wrong and what can be done better the next time around. And I think once you learn to sketch without being analytical, your progress will gain momentum. And honestly, I truly believe we learn more from our mistakes ...



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  13. #168
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    very nice studies man. come check out the spartan thread in the community activities for some gestures drawing.

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  14. #169
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    armando - hmm, yes immediacy of communication is key. But what is 'important'? The objective must be identified, *what* is being communicated? I wish I knew

    Lee W - I must admit I think you are right my friend. I suppose that I've been trying to be a hard-ass with the work ethic and all. But there's no denying that I'm getting tired of it. More than that, even though I typically discount the value of 'fun' (heh) I can't deny the value of 'passion'.

    MeTaL-Mike - welcome, Mike. I didn't make 50 in one day but I did do some gestures. Always a good exercise.

    And so... one month exactly until Revelations. I'm going to try to pick up the pace here, broaden my efforts as well. Don't want to be going into workshop activities from a completely cold start.

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    sketchbook...a kitten dies every time you don't comment

    “When forced to work within a strict framework,
    the imagination is taxed to its utmost – and will
    produce its richest ideas. Given total freedom,
    the work is likely to sprawl.”

    - TS Eliot


    Bloooooooog
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