Mouse Work...Can't wait for a Wacom!
 
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  1. #1
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    Mouse Work...Can't wait for a Wacom!

    Hello, everyone. I'm new at CA and also learning the basics on Digital compositions from everyone at this site. I mainly sketch on paper but I'm very excited in learning Corel Painter IX. I did this fruit that I can't name because I don't what exactly it looks like. I just wanted to see if you guys think that I'm understanding this program. I created this painting with a Tinting brush and a Tinting blender. Unfortunately, I did it with a mouse. I don't have a Tablet but I can't wait to get one. Thank you for all your comments.

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    man, draw with pencils if you have no wacom yet!! it rocks !!
    There is no magic in wacom tablet or painter IX ))

    mouse painting is perversion

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    Thank You

    Quote Originally Posted by Mex
    man, draw with pencils if you have no wacom yet!! it rocks !!
    There is no magic in wacom tablet or painter IX ))

    mouse painting is perversion
    Thank you for your comment. Did you meant my mouse painting rocks? because I know it could practice better if I had a Wacom. I do draw with pencil. It sounds to me like your not a Digital Artist by your comment of there not been "magic in wacom tablet or painter IX". Maybe more into traditional art perhaps. Well, Thank you anyway for the incourage.

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    Mouse painting is a pain in the arse, at least for me it is. I'd love me some tablet action.

    This seems ok for starters. Keep sketching IRL though, that's the most important. As far as painting, remember that shadows and highlights have their own identities as well, and aren't just lighter and darker versions of the base color (something that to this day is hard to get out of my programming, thank you very much junior high art class.) Warm highlights=cool shadows, and vice versa usually.

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    Here is the thing, I've seen extremely well done pieces that were done with a mouse, I’ve also seen extremely poorly done pieces that were done with a tablet. I believe what Mex meant by there is no magic in a Wacom or Painter is that they will not make you better in and of themselves. Developing your skills in composition, understanding of light and shadow, anatomy, and other traditional art things will improve your work weather you use digital mediums or physical mediums. In general people prefer the use of a tablet because it emulates the use of a real drawing tool more than a mouse does. The suggestion of working with pencil and paper until you get a tablet seems to be a fair suggestion in my mind, but I would also suggest getting a feel for the tools in whatever program you intend to eventually use, which you seem to already be doing. Really a mouse is no different than a tablet in these programs in the sense that with a mouse you use hotkeys to adjust variables on the fly and it takes longer, and a tablet you can preset variables to correspond with the pressure of the stylus.

    As far as your understanding of the program, yes you have found how to place colors on the ‘canvas’ anything beyond this basically just makes the process go faster or easier, but it will not necessarily make your work better. Please don’t take this post as a blast at you or anything, I just want to emphasize how important ‘traditional’ art skills are to any artist whether they are using digital or physical mediums. The biggest things will always be composition, understanding of light and shadow, and a detailed knowledge of the subject matter. Practice does not make perfect, but it certainly helps.

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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Truepinkas
    Here is the thing, I've seen extremely well done pieces that were done with a mouse, I’ve also seen extremely poorly done pieces that were done with a tablet. I believe what Mex meant by there is no magic in a Wacom or Painter is that they will not make you better in and of themselves. Developing your skills in composition, understanding of light and shadow, anatomy, and other traditional art things will improve your work weather you use digital mediums or physical mediums. In general people prefer the use of a tablet because it emulates the use of a real drawing tool more than a mouse does. The suggestion of working with pencil and paper until you get a tablet seems to be a fair suggestion in my mind, but I would also suggest getting a feel for the tools in whatever program you intend to eventually use, which you seem to already be doing. Really a mouse is no different than a tablet in these programs in the sense that with a mouse you use hotkeys to adjust variables on the fly and it takes longer, and a tablet you can preset variables to correspond with the pressure of the stylus.

    As far as your understanding of the program, yes you have found how to place colors on the ‘canvas’ anything beyond this basically just makes the process go faster or easier, but it will not necessarily make your work better. Please don’t take this post as a blast at you or anything, I just want to emphasize how important ‘traditional’ art skills are to any artist whether they are using digital or physical mediums. The biggest things will always be composition, understanding of light and shadow, and a detailed knowledge of the subject matter. Practice does not make perfect, but it certainly helps.

    Thank You very much for all your suggestions. Its true what you said about how important "traditional" art skills are to any type of artist. I do beleive that I still need to get a better understanding of light and shadow and anatomy. I will take all your suggestions to heart and to better myself.

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  8. #7
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    We all look forward to seeing your future works and helping out when we can. This community is a fabulous resource, so post often and always be open to learning.

    As for your piece of fruit i applaude you for using colors to show value, but some darker tones of the same hughs can also help especially on the darkest edge. I'd say it looks liek an orange, especially with that texturing, but it has a stem... I think i'd have the edge of the cast shadow get fuzzier the further away it gets from the fruit.

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