Good starting point for photoshop brush settings
 
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  1. #1
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    Good starting point for photoshop brush settings

    Can anyone tell me a good starting point for brushes in photoshop. I am just starting out so i'm just using the hard round brush with pen pressure set to opacity and flow but what should i set the opacity and flow jitter to and also the main opacity and flow. Also is there a way i can use shape dynamics without having it be by pen pressure. I know these are things i will tweek as i learn but i just need a good starting point. Thanks in advance.

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  3. #2
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    what i use is a hard round brush, and set the opacity at 25-40 percent. and if you go to brush controls you can set shape dynamics.

    the opacity depends on how you work, if you like to build up then have a lower opacity. 100 percent flow is what i use

    if you can make your own textured brushed to give textures to your works.

    just make a shape or texture you want to repeat thenselect the whole thing with a lasso tool then go to edit and say define brush present, remember it has to be greyscale, and high contrast shapes are best. this is incase you didnt know.

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  4. #3
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    Hard round brush, full opacity and flow, with pressure sensitivity set to affect both. If you want, you can set it to affect brush size, too. Play with the "minimum brush size" slider, too. You can't go wrong with these settings.

    As you paint, you may find yourself wanting brushes for specific tasks. Clouds, foliage, and water are three things that you may find difficult to paint using the standard hard round brush. It's nice to have a little more texture to your brushes in some cases. So experiment, see what works.

    A couple tips:

    1. Scattering can be very useful, particularly when you use it in conjunction with the Smudge tool.
    2. Jagged rectangular brush tips can do a remarkable job with clouds if you activate angle jitter.
    3. Turning the angle jitter control to "direction" can produce interesting new results from an old brush.

    Just experiment and have fun with it. You can develop new brushes whenever the need/want arises; don't worry about amassing a huge collection of brushes from the get-go. Remember that having the right brushes helps enormously, but they're NOT necessary.

    When I was younger, I really enjoyed Bob Ross' "Joy of Painting" shows on public television. (You know, the "happy tree" guy with the afro...) I tried to copy his oil painting techniques using watercolor...which didn't work, and my young mind didn't understand why...but now I've found his series on YouTube and I'm trying to use some of his techniques in Photoshop. I've developed some brushes in the process--brushes based on his physical brushes--that have become quite useful. You might try that, if you want.

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    I never liked Bob Ross's painting show because I simultaneously grew up reading Mark Kissler's Draw Squad books. Kissler is all about construction, and Ross is all about using paint to create the illusion of construction. They're two almost opposite concepts. I always thought Ross was hard to follow and less instructional than "magical". A few stokes and voila... a landscape.

    I'd like to go back and take a look at it now and see what I think of him.

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    Ah, I remember Kistler's books. Those were fun. The videos, too. And you're right about the approaches being very different. They both have an element of spontaneity, but Ross' programs certainly have that "magical" element to them. He doesn't spend all that much time explicitly describing his process...but then again, most people are WAY more familiar with pencil and paper than with oils and canvas. Part of the reason I enjoy Ross' programs is the fact that he makes it look so easy and quick; I try to analyze why and how he can do that.

    Keep in mind that Kistler and Ross catered to vastly different audiences with vastly different subject matter. Kistler is all about teaching perspective and other techniques for indicating three-dimensionality, mostly to children, with the subject matter often being cartoonish and character-based. Ross was all about teaching relaxing techniques of creating quick landscapes, mostly to adults, with the subject matter typically being realistic and nature-based. Both approaches are useful...but for very different things.

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  7. #6
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    Thanks guys

    Thanks for all the tips guys. Hopefully i will have some works up for crit soon.

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