Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    2,045
    Thanks
    44
    Thanked 154 Times in 149 Posts

    Painting the sides of your canvas?

    Ok, i have seen this in galleries, canvases that are displayed unframed, and the sides are painted. But, my question is should you or shouldn't you paint the sides, if you aren't framing it. Also another question, what colour to paint the sides? Complimentary colours too the painting, black, red, blue green, etc...?

    ~JB


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    4,422
    Thanks
    497
    Thanked 678 Times in 247 Posts
    I'my noy too familiar with traditional work.. But I'd imagine takign the Bruce Lee approach. punch behind your target, not where you want to hit. So you have your full energy through the whole strike. Maybe if you paint the sides as well, the energy of your oicture is at less risk of dying out before they hit the edge.
    * Help a CA artist! Visit the Constructive Critique section! *



  4. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    4,881
    Thanks
    285
    Thanked 1,452 Times in 259 Posts
    Justin - it's a personal thing. Do what looks good to you.

    Interceptor - roflmao!
    I think you are awesome, and I wish you the best in your endeavors, but I am tired of repeating myself, I am very busy with my new baby, and I am no longer a regular participant here, so please do not contact me to ask for advice on your career or education. All of the advice that I have to offer can already be found in the following links. Thank you.

    Perspective 101, Concept Art 101, Games Industry info,Oil Paint info, Acrylic Paint info, my sketchbook.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    The Crack of Doom
    Posts
    1,048
    Thanks
    121
    Thanked 107 Times in 67 Posts
    If you are using a standard depth canvas, usually galleries expect you to frame it, in which case you don't have to worry about painting the sides. If, however, you insist on not framing it, the sides shoud be painted. The color depends upon personal preference. Even if you like the look with out painting, give the sides a coat of white and make sure to tape along the edge so you get a nice straight line. This will make your piece look more neat and professional.

    Another option, instead of painting a solid color, is to continue the painting around the edges. This effect works very nicely with deep edge or gallery wrap canvases. These canvases are specifically made for artists who choose not to frame. They are generally made of a sturdier wood and are less prone to warping (in most cases).

    When in doubt about color, just go with black. It works every time.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Philly PA
    Posts
    3,389
    Thanks
    108
    Thanked 1,478 Times in 470 Posts
    I personally think unframed work with painted sides looks lazy, cheap, and unfinished, but that's just my own opinion. Presentation makes a significant difference in how people react to your work, so make sure you prefer the look and think it compliments your piece and are not just avoiding framing because it's a pain in the ass (this is coming from a guy who passionately hates building frames).

    that said, simple white with clean edges generally works best in my opinion, especially if your gallery has white walls.

    Many people may also choose to have the piece framed after purchase anyhow. This isn't uncommon even with pieces already framed.
    "Every little step considered one at a time is not terribly daunting" - Ethan Coen

    New books and process DVD available NOW!

    www.dvpalumbo.com

    Quickie blog (nudity)

  7. #6
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    3,233
    Thanks
    860
    Thanked 849 Times in 457 Posts
    I have seen very small non intrusive frames (I think they are called L-frames) for canvases it's like a box you stick your piece in, I think they require you to paint the sides as well. I generally paint the sides black wether or not I frame them.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    969
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 11 Times in 3 Posts
    I tend to go for painting the sides the colour of the wall that it's going to be hung on. It's unintrusive but not messy looking like they can sometimes get while you're working on them. Failing that, any other colour that doesn't attract too much attention is usually going to be fine.
    Art is long and time is fleeting

    Sketchbook
    Website

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    51
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 19 Times in 5 Posts
    Just make a completely new painting on the sides

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Philly PA
    Posts
    3,389
    Thanks
    108
    Thanked 1,478 Times in 470 Posts
    a box you stick your piece in, I think they require you to paint the sides as well
    shadow boxes? there's typicaly about a half inch to an inch between your painting and the inside edge of the frame
    "Every little step considered one at a time is not terribly daunting" - Ethan Coen

    New books and process DVD available NOW!

    www.dvpalumbo.com

    Quickie blog (nudity)

  11. #10
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    3,233
    Thanks
    860
    Thanked 849 Times in 457 Posts
    This is what I'm talking about, I've heard them called l-frames or float-frames (altought somewhere else a float frame was a frame where you put your pic between 2 layers of glass)
    http://www.hartfordfineart.com/galle...s.asp?view=252

    http://www.hangit.com.au/styles.htm

    Float frame

    A float frame is a special "L" shaped moulding made to enhance a stretched canvas, (when it is not being covered by glass). A float frame does not overlap the edge of the painting, but sits behind and around the edge, often leaving a space between the frame and the painting - so the painting appears to be floating within the frame.

  12. #11
    Ilaekae's Avatar
    Ilaekae is offline P.O.W.! Leader, Complete Idiot, Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Southwestern Pennsylvania
    Posts
    7,129
    Thanks
    8,241
    Thanked 5,581 Times in 1,789 Posts
    I'm slowly switching from stretched canvas to panels glued to wood strips and covered with canvas and burlap and shit. If you do it neatly and carefully, you end up with a nice thick "slab" look that looks good on the wall. Then I just continue the painting onto the sides.

    Lot of work, but it has one really good rationale...I have no income to buy frames, so my expenses are cut way down. Larger pieces, like 30x40 and above, I use those simple metal frames you assemble with corner pieces. On really big pieces, I go googy and just screw or bolt on trim wood that i paint or stain...right through the 2x2 stretchers I use.
    No position or belief, whether religious, political or social, is valid if one has to lie to support it.--Alj Mary

    Ironically, the concept of SIMPLICITY is most often misunderstood by simple-minded people. --Alj Mary

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    4,881
    Thanks
    285
    Thanked 1,452 Times in 259 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Qitsune
    This is what I'm talking about, I've heard them called l-frames or float-frames (altought somewhere else a float frame was a frame where you put your pic between 2 layers of glass)
    http://www.hartfordfineart.com/galle...s.asp?view=252
    Yikes! For that price you might as well go to a professional framer.
    I think you are awesome, and I wish you the best in your endeavors, but I am tired of repeating myself, I am very busy with my new baby, and I am no longer a regular participant here, so please do not contact me to ask for advice on your career or education. All of the advice that I have to offer can already be found in the following links. Thank you.

    Perspective 101, Concept Art 101, Games Industry info,Oil Paint info, Acrylic Paint info, my sketchbook.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    3,430
    Thanks
    643
    Thanked 1,484 Times in 719 Posts
    I knew a guy who would just buy framed prints of unicorns leaping over rainbows and shiny ferraris ( you know the stuff I mean, "Athena, the poster people" kinda stuff) then pull the back out, cut a new board to fit then paint on that.

    Framed and glazed painting for about 3 quid, he seemed to do pretty well with it.

    I don't think anyone ever noticed..
    Last edited by Flake; October 24th, 2006 at 07:20 PM.

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    2,045
    Thanks
    44
    Thanked 154 Times in 149 Posts
    Damn been busy, lost track of this thread too. Thank you all for the info once again, it all helps alot!

    Now what would i do without you guys...

Similar Threads

  1. First painting on canvas
    By JBetts in forum Art Critique Center
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: December 24th, 2010, 02:29 AM
  2. Any advice on figure painting (oil on canvas)
    By penzilla in forum Art Discussions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: February 16th, 2010, 11:57 PM
  3. Art: painting on digitally printed canvas...
    By Magic Man in forum Fine Art
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: April 30th, 2006, 04:58 AM
  4. Art: Painting - preparing the canvas
    By EgoBubble in forum Fine Art
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: April 16th, 2004, 04:37 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Designed by The Coldest Water, we build the coldest best water bottles, ice packs and best pillows.