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Thread: WTF Shall i do?

  1. #1
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    WTF Shall i do?

    Ok i live in the UK and really dont know what course to take for uni Im thinking of Illustration at Plymouth University but would that do me any good for becoming a computer games concepter. Or should i take the more gaming side of things and actually go for a course in computer games art which would mean moving 200miles away
    What u guys think.

    P.S: PLEASE DONT VIEW THIS POST AND THEN LEAVE, I REALLY NEED SOME FEEDBACK AND NOT JUST 20 VIEWS AND 0 COMMENTS.
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  3. #2
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    computer games art? For a concept artist in school?
    That seems a bit strange to me. The important thing is that you can draw / paint a readable image to give to the next stage of production. So I don't see what special tricks some specialty game school would teach you that an art school professor could not.

    I say if you like art, take art.. maybe there's a side of art that you have'nt discovered you like yet. Maybe you'll love oil painting and want to do book covers or something. Taking a 'game art' course seems akward and very limiting.

    EDIT - But I am young and still in the early stages of learning, so everything I said could be totally wrong.
    Last edited by Interceptor; October 9th, 2006 at 12:42 PM.
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    What you should really do is use the search option, and check out the other threads. I'm not saying this in a mean way. There's a lot of these :
    "Do I need to be able to draw to animate, model, texture, whatever...?"
    "Do I need to go to school in order to be successful etc...?"
    "I have no artistic skill, but I want to go for 3d..."
    "How do I become a concept artist?!"

    If you really look, you'll be able to find answers to these questions. Then it just depends on if you want to take their advice. A lot of people ask these things, and then they dont listen.

    Seedling has an interesting post about getting into games. Ben Mathis says a lot of good things on his website about the whole thing. Look up what the Pros on conceptart.org are saying. All of them write tons of useful information.

    These are valid questions, but people should really spend some time looking for the answers.

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    as rebelismo said if you search for it there have been a few uk specific threads in the art school section.

    i have just started a computer games art and animation course in doncaster. on my course we have 2 dayd dong 3d stuff, a day life drawing, and the rest is made up of design and illustration. but from my experience from the other courses i applied for each games art course is very different, you really need to go to open days.

    there are other avenues to go through, you could do industrial design as well as illustration or a games art course

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    If I had to choose...I'd start off in fine arts (and use that to explore mediums) - then change majors to a slightly more commercially applicable major such as Illustration, Animation, or Graphic Design (personally I lean more towards Illustration)... would take an extra year or two (probably not 2 since they're closely related disciplines) - and would expose you to the variety of media you wouldn't otherwise encounter.

    As always though...the most important thing is to DO ART (draw/paint/sculpt cow dung/whatever) - learn and explore mediums and subjects.

    Now...It's also worth noting that there really isn't any job that is "game developer" or otherwise....it's specific tasks withing a game developing firm. Artists, Programers, Level Designers...of different status and specialties (ranging from the management level "Lead Artist" to the slum lord "gopher coffee boy!" ).

    Since I don't know your age (I usually reserve saying overused cliche saying for younger people wanting to get into the industry): The Game industry isn't a game. You help MAKE the game (which takes lots of work), you only play them to test them (some companies have a required number of test hours per week, some don't - depends on the company).

    Be sure it's the industry you want to get into, because the game industry is fairly unique in its structure - and many people are very misinformed about it.

    (Can anyone tell I read too much about the industry, and root around? - I especially like the "myths of the industry" type deals , they're always fun to read because people often like being humorous with them).
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    Quote Originally Posted by oven g love
    but from my experience from the other courses i applied for each games art course is very different, you really need to go to open days.
    Very true. I applied to 5 different Illustration course @ different places and none of them were the same, in any way. The main problem I found was that many leaned more towards Graphic Design which could'nt be further from what I want to do. As oven g said, if you find a course you think you like, go to an open day to make sure it suits you - ideally before you apply. There are a lot of decent Illustration course out there, but I'd suggest a Foundation Course if you really want to go places.

    As far as computer game courses go, I have'nt really found one that is suited to teaching skills for the concept artist, but perhapes thats because I did'nt look hard enough. As personal advise I would do a course that will give you the chance to develope your skills as artist, because there what you will need to be a successful concept artist. But thats just me.
    Last edited by flatliner; October 9th, 2006 at 02:10 PM.
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    Do what you want to at degree level, and then do a specific masters course. IMO degrees that are over specialised can be limiting - you may have a completely different style and ambition after three years at uni.

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    Thanks guys, and yer sorry about the whole search thing; this site is Huge lmao.
    Thanks.

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  10. #9
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    Uh, Many concept artists majored in Illustration; a video games focused education will only limit your horizons IMO.

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    KK, Thanks for the help. Illustration ftw then.
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  12. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rebelismo
    Seedling has an interesting post about getting into games.
    Why thank you! :-)
    I think you are awesome, and I wish you the best in your endeavors, but I am tired of repeating myself, I am very busy with my new baby, and I am no longer a regular participant here, so please do not contact me to ask for advice on your career or education. All of the advice that I have to offer can already be found in the following links. Thank you.

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    Also, don't expect to just go through either course then apply for a job as a concept artist. There's a very slim chance of getting a job as a concept artist right out of school. Concept art is a tough job to get, and it takes experience and a hell of a portfolio. You either need to spend some time in related fields building that portfolio, spend some time in the game industry as a modeller, texturer, etc. or build your experience as a concept artist for amateur/indie games (which is not going to pay much at all). There are many other roads to take, but none of them are easy.



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  14. #13
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    "game art" and "illustration" are not mutually exclusive. infact, "game art" is not a field unto itself, it's just a difference of subject matter, not of style.

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