What type of masonite should I use?

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  1. #1
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    What type of masonite should I use?

    I heard somewhere that it is much cheaper to buy masonite from a hardware store. I went to a Home Depot and there were a bunch of different types of masonite. I have heard that some have a lot of oil in the board and cause problems in the future. I am looking for something archival. Thanks in advance!

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  3. #2
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    I wouldn't swear on either of them being archival, BUT don't use TEMPERED masonite. You want UN-tempered. It's structurally a bit weaker and not quite as heavy, but the tempered version has a saturation of oils and crap that makes it sometimes unstable for serious painting.

    How about trying a really thin plywood that's made with outdoor glues instead (1/4" or so) If you can't get a surface you like, you can gesso-glue a light-weight canvas to it...

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    I personally cannot stand the texture of masonite, but I do enjoy working on Birch ply or most other hardwoods. My 2cents, I have no idea what the differences of masonite oil content are.

    But it's always cheaper to buy panels from the Home Depot than from the art supply store. They gouge you, man

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    i have a small mom and pop hardware store near me and i go in a grab their scraps of masonite for next to nothing. as far as archival qualities, i don't know. but i really don't care becasue i have not made anything worth preserving for 500 years.

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    I actually know it better by look and feel than by name.. Sad...

    http://www.toddlockwood.com/faq.shtml#what_surface

    It seems Mr Lockwood contradicts Ilaekae, but I think Todd's less concerned about archival properties. (and really he's almost all digital now anyway)

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    Just a tiny bit off topic, but have you tried Strathmore illo board? Nice surface... archival... and if it's too flexy for you, you can always tape it to a foamcore backing. (I do believe this is what Dan DosSantos does.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by CCThrom
    Just a tiny bit off topic, but have you tried Strathmore illo board? Nice surface... archival... and if it's too flexy for you, you can always tape it to a foamcore backing. (I do believe this is what Dan DosSantos does.)
    That is what Dan does-- Strathmore DOUBLE THICK Illo Board, 3 thin coats of gesso on both sides before taping it down. Let me strongly recommend the taping to foam core. I tried this technique for my LMSTD round 2 pic without taping it down and there was some pretty serious warping by the time I went to photograph it. (I was chastised by Dan for it, HA!) Dan even told me he re-tapes the finished illustration with clean tape to the same foam-core for framing, so it always has that stiffer backing. It's a nice surface otherwise.

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    Thanks everybody! There are some good recommendations here. I definitely going to try them out. I have been using masonite for a while now and think its time for a change. This is the boost I needed to go out and try some new surfaces! I'll be sure to post what I come up with, and most won't matter if it is archival or not. haha.

    Nice new avatar Mr. Palumbo!

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    Strathmore illo board
    I use this pretty much exclusively these day. I prefer a little absorbtion in my surface, which masonite most certainly does not have. Also nice is primed watercolor paper on foamcore, because it has a little more canvas-like bounce to it

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    Lately I have been shellacing my masonite to get a nice slick surface. It has a very different feel than anything I've used before. For example, if you needed to wipe an area out you will get a just about perfect original state. Also the paint seems to "glide" on the surface in a way that resembles skating on ice. Yeah, I know, bad analogy. But it is alot of fun moving the paint around with such ease!

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  12. #11
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    I bought some of these for myself for my B-day - gonna try them out, but I hear great things about this company. I'll let you know what I think once i use them. Of course- it can get costly getting fancy panels to work on if you don't prepare your own.
    http://www.realgesso.com/

    I never used this company, but I think jeff soto is currently using them >
    looks interesting

    http://www.luciushudson.com/

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