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  1. #40
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    Hey if you send the application through the mail, do they send you something telling you they got it?
    No, they don't send you any sort of receipt. If you really want to know (like I did) you can wait until it should have gotten there and give admissions a call. Just ask and they should be able to tell you if they have it.

    I'm looking into applying to the Illustration programme for '07 but I have to do some serious scholarship hunting...
    Oh well I'll never get in unless I try.
    Have you tried fastweb yet? Remember, if you can scrape together ten $500 scholarships it still adds up to $5,000 you don't have to pay out-of-pocket or with loans.

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  3. #41
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    Hm I was really set on the computer animation program but the new game art design major seems pretty interesting. Thoughts? My main concern would be the depth of the game program, where as the ca is known nation wide hmmmm...?

    New Sketch Pad Coming Soon
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  4. #42
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    Ringling school

    So is it hard to get into Ringling? I am so nervous to go to a National portfolio day.

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  5. #43
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    Hm I was really set on the computer animation program but the new game art design major seems pretty interesting. Thoughts? My main concern would be the depth of the game program, where as the ca is known nation wide hmmmm...?
    Unfortunately none of us really know what the new major is going to be like. Actually, I've heard thoughts about making it a minor for Illustration majors which would probably be better than having it as a separate major since it wouldn't give the students such a narrow skillset.

    If you want to do computer animation then by all means do it! But if you really want to draw or do concept work then computer animation is not the major of choice; they have very few drawing classes after freshman year.

    So I guess the question is... what do you want to do with your degree when you get out of school? Do you want to do computer animation, or do you want to draw/paint?

    I am so nervous to go to a National portfolio day.
    Don't be nervous! Nothing at a NPD constitutes a permanent decision. They're just going to give you some opinions/pointers for your real portfolio and you shouldn't be afraid to ask them questions, too. That's one of the things that's so great about NPDs, they give you a practice run for the real thing and give you feedback about what the actual admissions people are looking for.

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  6. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gbertek
    Hm I was really set on the computer animation program but the new game art design major seems pretty interesting. Thoughts? My main concern would be the depth of the game program, where as the ca is known nation wide hmmmm...?
    I agree with everything that oddyti said--Going into the GD major would give you a really narrow skill set. However, from what I know about Ringling, I think you would be pretty successful in finding a career. I've heard from admissions officers that EA loves Ringling. Another thing to keep in mind is that by being a CA major, it's not like you can't do work on video games. You'll just have a broader education so that you can work on other types of projects if need be.

    The main reason I'm posting is because I just got back from the National Portfolio Review day at CCAD, and I have some major advice for all Ringling CA wannabes!

    First of all, the rep I spoke with said to make sure that your pieces really show depth. After all, we're going into 3D animation, aren't we? Make sure that the backgrounds to your pieces (and you should be including backgrounds) are not as clear as your foregrounds. You don't want your viewer's focus to be on the background instead of the focus of the piece. Also, you really want to make sure there's a lot of push-pull going on through your artwork. Change the scale of things; don't be afraid to skew things a bit. Make your art interesting! SHOW MOTION IN YOUR ART (that one was REALLY emphasized!) Yes, Ringling really wants to see still life, but they're turned off by boring stuff like a bowl of fruit or a cow skull. The rep I talked to gave me a great example.

    One student turned in a piece of something from a fly's point of view. The student ripped out a piece of turf and a twig from outdoors. From there, he found a dead fly and put it on the twig. In the turf, the student placed two staplers facing the fly so that they looked like two giant monsters. After that, the student lit everything. In his actual drawing, he wound up curving the staplers a little so that they looked more ferocious--he made the objects work for his piece. It also showed motion. Motion is HUGE. (I mean... we're trying to be ANIMATORS...right??)

    Some more advice that I got from other schools was really helpful, too. You should have a reason behind your art and be able to expain why you chose to go about making it as you did. Your art should reveal something about you, not just your skill set. (Not that skills aren't important!) One school I talked to really said that you should think about putting interesting titles to your pieces and somehow displaying it alongside your work--it just adds one more dimension to your art. I'm not sure if Ringling is huge about the title thing, but I definitley agree that your portfolio should reveal something about you.

    If anyone has a chance, they should definitley get to a National Portfolio Review day (And if you go, get in line for the school you want to see most early on--the lines get LONG really fast!!). I learned a lot, and I'm glad I went--I would have been wasting my time on a couple of pieces that I had started.

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  7. #45
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    Wow! thanks a lot sinfulsanit! that was a very informative post.

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  8. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by thesinfulsaint
    First of all, the rep I spoke with said to make sure that your pieces really show depth. After all, we're going into 3D animation, aren't we? Make sure that the backgrounds to your pieces (and you should be including backgrounds) are not as clear as your foregrounds. You don't want your viewer's focus to be on the background instead of the focus of the piece. Also, you really want to make sure there's a lot of push-pull going on through your artwork. Change the scale of things; don't be afraid to skew things a bit. Make your art interesting! SHOW MOTION IN YOUR ART (that one was REALLY emphasized!) Yes, Ringling really wants to see still life, but they're turned off by boring stuff like a bowl of fruit or a cow skull. The rep I talked to gave me a great example.
    Thanks for the info, but now I'm paranoid (again) cause I have a bowl of fruit and a cow (actually horse) skull in my work. Ringling Rep Bucky told me the same thing about lotz of motion - I made sure I have plenty life drawings and work that shows motion this time around. The idea bout the fly was good.

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  9. #47
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    aHHH i have no motion drawings. I'm dead.

    Right now I'm working on a self portrait.

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  10. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by artmessiah
    Thanks for the info, but now I'm paranoid (again) cause I have a bowl of fruit and a cow (actually horse) skull in my work. Ringling Rep Bucky told me the same thing about lotz of motion - I made sure I have plenty life drawings and work that shows motion this time around. The idea bout the fly was good.
    Well, I don't think they're against ALL of that kind of stuff--I've seen some of your work, and you seem pretty top notch. There is something to be said for high quality work. On top of that, every piece in your portfolio doesn't HAVE to be like that--just make sure you include some of that kind of stuff because it'll really make you stand out. I was fretting about that kind of stuff this morning, too, until my dad pointed that out to me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Shipsailsouttosea
    aHHH i have no motion drawings. I'm dead.

    Right now I'm working on a self portrait.
    Nahh. You've still got plenty of time. Self portraits are always a good thing, too.

    Oh! And another thing the Ringling rep told me. When you do portraits, stay away from the typical "deer in headlights" pose. Do something interesting with it. If you look in my sketchbook, there should be a portrait of my boyfriend in there--he liked that. He said it was a good kind of portrait to include because it was expressive and it showed some motion of the face.

    And another thing... (I just keep editing this post!)
    The rep I talked to was FOR finished life drawings, but he really didn't seem very into including gestural figure stuff in the portfolio. He said that stuff is great for sketchbooks, but your portfolio should really be top quality, finished stuff.

    And I'm glad I could help out! Haha, seriously, the first thing I thought about in the car on the way home was "I can't wait to get online and post this stuff!"

    Last edited by thesinfulsaint; October 1st, 2006 at 09:59 PM.
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  11. #49
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    For Motion art? Could I do my dog running to get a ball I threw? I'm not used to seeing how motion art would look anyone have any links or anything to show me..

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  12. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by shipsailsouttosea
    For Motion art? Could I do my dog running to get a ball I threw? I'm not used to seeing how motion art would look anyone have any links or anything to show me..
    Well, the whole concept of motion confuses me a little, too. The example I gave about the staplers is something he said that showed motion because it implies the staplers biting at the fly. If you drew your dog running to catch a ball, yes, it would imply motion but a.) you wouldn't be able to work from life and b.) I think you could come up with something a little more creative than that. Try to anthropomorphize (if I spelled that word right Oo) an ordinary object, like a stapler, and put it in an interesting scene. The biggest thing about it is creativity. If you have a really creative image, you'll stand out. Period.

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  13. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by thesinfulsaint
    ...The rep I talked to was FOR finished life drawings, but he really didn't seem very into including gestural figure stuff in the portfolio...
    hmmm i would think gesture drawings show motion very well. I wouldnt treat his advice like its written in stone.

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  14. #52
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    Ok, i have a few questions (seeing as im entirely new to this).
    1. to make sure, its alright to send in your application first, and then send in your actual portfolio later, right?
    2. When i send in my portfolio on a CD, is it necessary to label what medium, size, etc?
    3. ive never really had any experience in watercolor, acrylics, etc (im entirely self taught), but i am good with graphite and some charcoal. Is it okay if my portfolio is mostly graphite?
    thanks for all the help

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