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  1. #61
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    Portfolios, Reels, Resumes, and Cover Letters

    If you are asking “how many images I should have in my portfolio”, then you are asking the wrong question. Your portfolio or reel, and accompanying resume and cover letter, have two purposes: to tell the company what sort of work you want to be doing for them, and to demonstrate that you are capable of doing it. So the question you need to ask is “what do I need to include in my portfolio or reel to demonstrate that I am capable of doing what I want to be doing?”

    There really are no rules other than that.



    But I feel like I should fill up more space on the subject, so here are some additional unorganized rambles on the topic.

    Having a web-page will make your life easier, because then you won’t have to assemble and mail physical portfolios.

    But physical portfolios can be fun, too, and they don’t get lost in a busy art director’s e-mail. It took me two rounds of portfolios to get myself a job, and mine were of the physical variety. Sorry, I don’t have either of them on line, but I can tell you about what I did and didn’t do right.

    The first portfolio was the dreamy product of my senior year of college. It was a hand-made book that folded open like an accordion, and every square inch that wasn’t taken up with color images was squashed full of drawings. It was beautiful; it was also extremely work-intensive to physically assemble, it couldn’t be expanded upon, and the images were all way, way too small. Some woman at Disney told me “that’s nice, now can we see your portfolio please?” But on the other hand, I made a limited edition of these as hand-made books complete with wooden covers and glossy prints. Two years later, someone found one of them in a drawer at a company where I would have given a limb to work at right out of college. They wanted to know if I was still looking for work. With a sigh I said no.

    The second portfolio was strictly utilitarian. It consisted of multiple loose pages capable of being passed around a table easily. Each page contained one or two color images or drawings, and my contact information in case the pages got separated. I added content to this portfolio as the post-college months went on.


    Reels. If you don’t have animation to show, a reel isn’t necessary. But, *shrug* if you feel happier spinning your models around instead of just showing screen-shots, it’s your call. See paragraph one.

    Keep in mind that when reels are reviewed, it is the last thing the art director or team wants to be doing. There’s a pile of tapes. Most of what is on those tapes is painful to watch. The experience is like sitting down to deliberately watch commercials. So keep it brief – under a minute - and show only your best work.


    Showing 3D work. Are your models so deliciously low-poly that an art director of games will drool? Show that. Are you skilled at laying out Uvs? Show that. Have you written a tutorial on laying out Uvs? Heck, show that too.

    Do not hesitate to put text in your portfolio. And absolutely include text if you are showing work that is only partially yours. “This thinamjiggy was an extracurricular team project. I made the blah and textured the bloo.” This sort of brief and clear information is extremely helpful to whomever is hiring you.


    Concept art. Show that you can do 2D images at every level from thumb-nail to polished painting. Show that you miraculously transmit any imagined idea into a drawing that clearly communicates your idea. When I am reviewing your portfolio, I am going to be thinking of what it will be like to make 3D art from your drawings. I want to see versatility and communication.

    Since I know how many people there are here at conceptart.org who think copying photographs is good artistic exercise, let me alert you to something. We can tell the difference between traced photographs and original work. Unless you are as good as Norman Rockwell, then having traced work in your portfolio can hurt your chances of getting hired. This is because when you need to come up with sketches of a three-headed giant flying alien by four in the afternoon, there will not be a photograph in the world that can help you.


    Ah. . . I have run out of steam on this topic. I can’t think of a catchy way to wrap this up, so instead go reread the first paragraph.

    Go on, do it. And then relax a bit. It is that simple. You have the answers already.
    Last edited by Seedling; October 7th, 2006 at 10:34 AM.


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  4. #62
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    Uh oh, that just reminded me. I need to prepare a portfolio for the next workshop lol. Michelle, is there any way to meet you in person before December?

    One question: for physical portfolio's, is it ever a good idea to bring original drawings/paintings of anything or should all your work be photographed and printed?

  5. #63
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    Actually for portfolios I have a little gem of advice.

    Make sure you gear it correctly. (Was this mentioned already?)
    So if you applying for a concept job, keep it mainly concept art.
    Comicbooks, keep it comicbooks.
    Storyboards, storyboards.
    Etc.

    It seem kinda obvious, but a lotta people miss this one.
    There was a guy in school who was a really good illustrator. But he put everything in his portfolio. I mean ev-er-y-th-in-GAA! So he had a 40 page portfolio of stuff.

    darkwolf, print stuff. So you get the person you send it to can keep it and you don't have to worry about losing originals.

  6. #64
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    This is so invaluable....SEEDLING I want to give you money or my first born or something, you are such a champ!...WAY TO GO!!!!

  7. #65
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    What about using photographs to look at for reference? That's got to be ok... I mean - when you're just beginning and you need to learn anatomy and your neighbors aren't willing to go naked for you for hours on end... looking at a photograph to view (not trace) and reproduce for anatomy's sake can't be a bad thing...??

    Better than trying to make it up as you go along anyway -- too many beginners don't reference enough really, and make horrible anatomy mistakes that stick with them for years.
    “It is enough that we set out to mold the motley stuff of life into some form of our own choosing; when we do, the performance is itself the wage.”
    -Learned Hand

    "The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and science. He to whom the emotion is a stranger, who can no longer pause and stand wrapped in awe, is as good as dead; his eyes are closed." ~Albert Einstein


  8. #66
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    Photo reference always helps. It's one of the things used when you can't get a pose or don't know what something looks like. Like, I have no clue what cars look like and can't draw them out of my head, so I go and look from reference for cars.

    But, photo refrence is no substitute for drawing from life.

  9. #67
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    Great thread! I've read it from beginning to end which rarely happens for me.

    Seedling, thanks for all your input. It can be hard to go towards a goal when you're not entirely sure what that goal is or even how to get there. As you say thuogh, it's all educated guesses and leaps of faith.

    I'm currently taking a leap of faith. I've taken a year off from my school to work on my basic fundamentals and pay off the debt I got myself into from my first year of school. It's also a kind of test run to see if I can motivate myself to learn on my own and ramp up my owns skills so that I might be able to bypass School. CA will be invaluable in that goal as it is basically an environment of like minded artists at skill levels equal or much much higher to mine!

    What am I doing? I sketch everyday for 20min. I do a daily composition(concentrating on making it looser and more gestural while still thinking of design/perspective). I also do some loose studies from my anatomy book (Peck.) I have two larger projects I'm working on as well. A Redux of the characters from Final Fantasy 6, and a sprite based videogame that I'm making with my brother who is a programmer.

    Things I'd like to work on...my sense of composition. This was not covered well enough in school. I also need to find a life drawing class to take on my own time...the best part about last year was that I was receiving 15hrs of life drawing a week.

    Nice to know that I'm not the only one who has felt doubts from not having a clear direction. And that I'm not the only one to jump around schools. I'm actually trying to decide if I should head back to my school for the animation part of it, or switch to another school for illustration.
    [][][][] DRAW EVERYDAY [][][][]>

  10. #68
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    More on Portfolios

    I know, it’s normal to fret over every last thing that goes in your portfolio. You want to have everything perfect. But it’s art: it’s subjective. There is no “perfect”. Either your portfolio communicates that you can do the job you want to do; or it communicates that you can’t do the job you want to do, or that you can’t do the job as well as the other applicant; or your portfolio mumbles incoherently. Of all the possibilities, when it comes time to assemble your portfolio, it is that last category that you most have the power to avoid.

    About tailoring your portfolio to fit the job you are applying for: go reread that first paragraph again. Part of the answer to the question “what do I need to include in my portfolio or reel to demonstrate that I am capable of doing what I want to be doing?” is that you don’t fill a portfolio with demonstrations of your cabinetry skills when you are applying for a job as a graphic designer.

    So, about that second portfolio I had made, the one with the separate pages: that one had the potential to be particularly good when it came to sending different portfolios to different types of jobs. I could have left out certain pages for certain types of jobs. (Not that I actually did that. Oops.)

    With an online portfolio, you’re stuck more with a one-size-fits-all approach. Make sure that the right people can easily find their way to the right kind of art.

    One other note about tailoring your subject matter to fit the job: know what is appropriate subject matter. This isn’t something that you will need to worry about in most cases. Showing pictures of robots or sports to a company that makes high fantasy games is fine. If your portfolio contains nothing but football images, the worst that will happen is that they’ll wonder if you will really be happy making knights and castles – and if you make it to the interview stage, they will bring this up. On the other hand, if you send a portfolio full of sexually explicit imagery to a company who makes PG-rated work, your judgment will immediately be questioned and held against you, no matter the quality of the work.

    Years ago we received a demo reel that primarily featured an animation dominated by a pair of oversized breasts which went bouncing around the screen like giant yo-yos. It was so over the top in its inappropriateness that our art director at the time had to restrain himself from writing back to the applicant to say “are you nuts?”

    Assuming that not all of you work is digital, you will have occasion to show your original art. Such occasions will typically be at interviews or portfolio review days at colleges. I don’t know of any company that would ask to have you mail your originals to them, and if such a company ever asked that of me, I would politely tell them that I am no longer interested in working for them. My assumption is that letting your portfolio of originals out of your sight is just asking for trouble, unless it is in a very controlled situation.

    Oh – one thing I did that helped me at my interview for Turbine, was that in the days before the interview, I made drawings specifically to take to the interview. I showed up with a portfolio of original work, and I was able to point at the drawings and say “I drew this stuff just for you!”

    About using photo reference. . . first of all, I notice the term “reference” is used an awful lot around here to mean “I traced this” or “I copied this exactly”. That is not reference. That’s copying. If you want to be an illustrator or fine artist, and if you want to take your own photographs to copy from, then that’s ethically fine, and you could potentially make a good career of it.

    As a concept artist, or even as a modeler/texturer, you have absolutely got to be able to work without the scaffolding of a photo to trace.

    On the other hand, yes, you can use photo reference, in the true sense of the word. This means that if you are drawing or building a spider, it’s absolutely fine to dredge up photographs of spiders from the internet, so that you can see for yourself how many joints a spider has in its legs, how the jaws attach, etc. In fact, it would be a bad idea not to have some photo reference on hand. But using reference in this manner is to help you build an accurate 3D image of a spider in your mind. It’s the mental spider that you want to draw or model from, no the photographs, so that the result doesn’t look like a plain old tarantula blown up to the size of an elephant. There has got to be something original about the final product, and that won’t happen from relying heavily on photographs.

    *phew* Is there anything I’ve failed to cover about portfolios? Let me know.

    Post Script. . .

    Yes, in your resume, do include a list of what relevant software you know. The company that is considering you needs to know if you will be able to hit the ground running or if you are going to need some serious training.
    Last edited by Seedling; October 7th, 2006 at 10:36 AM.

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  12. #69
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    Otherside – good luck with your leap of faith. If you have the dedication to learn what you need, I think you’ll do fine. Also, if it better fits your life, you could take individual classes and not worry about getting a degree.

    Quote Originally Posted by darkwolfb87
    Michelle, is there any way to meet you in person before December?
    I’m not any more useful in person than I am here. Really. I am extremely shy, and not a good speaker.

    Quote Originally Posted by ConCrete
    This is so invaluable....SEEDLING I want to give you money or my first born or something. . .
    Egads, are you trying to scare me away? :-P

    Quote Originally Posted by DoInferno
    Also i have this situation. I´m located in Brazil and the game industry here is very new and have very few companies, most of them are small ones strugling to get a share of the market making advergames and mobile games. Very few of them are working for the consoles, wich i guess is where a good concept artist would really be necessary...

    I have a fine arts degree in painting, and i have been studying a lot to be able to make as good art is i can. I still haven´t send my portfolio to the companies in my area because i´m trying to learn so many different things i don´t know where to go next, hehe... Shoul i try pixel art? Learn how to make good tiles? Try to learn 3D? The reason i ask is that i´m afraid being able to paint, drawn and create might not be enough around here... What would you guys say about that?
    I have never heard of “pixel art”, but it sounds like very low-resolution art for cell phones or other tiny hand-held game devices. A combination of drawing, modeling, and texturing is the most likely to get you a job making games. But if you specifically want a job at a company that makes cell-phone games, then try to figure out how to make the art that they need. Try getting in touch with an artist at one of those companies and ask them for advice. Good luck!

    Quote Originally Posted by Shaolin7
    If you're asking about a general interning spot, would it help to submit images in the e-mail or is that just an annoyance?
    *shrug* Just a link is probably the safer thing to do, just in case the e-mail gods are tempted to eat the e-mailed image.

    Quote Originally Posted by tensai
    so a big thanks and props to seedling - i think it just needs time to grow for people to become aware.
    edit - is it in the wrong section? i mean, it's in the right section but not if this is to be discovered by a big group of people. people are a bit lazy browsing to different sections in the forums. how about the 'fine art studies & discovery' or 'education and learning' sections?
    :-) Thanks! Feel free to post links to this thread anywhere that you think would be useful to folks.
    I think you are awesome, and I wish you the best in your endeavors, but I am tired of repeating myself, I am very busy with my new baby, and I am no longer a regular participant here, so please do not contact me to ask for advice on your career or education. All of the advice that I have to offer can already be found in the following links. Thank you.

    Perspective 101, Concept Art 101, Games Industry info,Oil Paint info, Acrylic Paint info, my sketchbook.

  13. #70
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    You've never heard of pixel art?

    Sigh. Kids these days...

  14. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Memory
    You've never heard of pixel art?

    Sigh. Kids these days...
    When you were getting started in the games industry, I was getting started in middle school. ;-) Neener neener!

    Got any advice for us kiddies? :-)
    I think you are awesome, and I wish you the best in your endeavors, but I am tired of repeating myself, I am very busy with my new baby, and I am no longer a regular participant here, so please do not contact me to ask for advice on your career or education. All of the advice that I have to offer can already be found in the following links. Thank you.

    Perspective 101, Concept Art 101, Games Industry info,Oil Paint info, Acrylic Paint info, my sketchbook.

  15. #72
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    Environment Art

    The games industry needs more environment artists.

    I don’t know if most companies make any distinction between their environment artists and their character artists. I do know that most applicants have portfolios full of characters and monsters. All of the rest of the stuff on the screen is mistakenly thought of with derision as “background art”, which is some sort of snobby holdover from cell animation.

    But guess what? Even with cell animation, “background art” was highly complex even before computers came into the picture. And even when the “background art” is simple, it still takes up a good ninety percent of the screen real estate on any given game.

    Environments in most games are 3D, so the word “background” just doesn’t apply. Environments are everything that is not a character or non-player character or monster or vehicle, or user interface. Environments are the ground, the buildings, the dungeons, the landscapes, the architecture; and environments include all the doo-dads that decorate these things. Environments are game levels, and all of the stuff that makes up game levels.

    As I said earlier, the games industry needs more environment artists. Hardly any new applicants walk in the door that have ever paid any mind to the rocks and trees and buildings. Even established game industry artists are often of such a character mind-set that they think anybody who has dabbled in Maya can build an environment as an afterthought. (They are wrong.) So, if you are looking for a way into the industry, this might be an option for you.

    To help you understand the importance of environments, and the fun, let me tell you about a recent assignment I was given. I was told “we need a desert area for our game. The general color scheme and look should be about like this – (concept art) – and the layout of the area should be about like this – (rough map). We need you to build all of the art assets* and assemble the area. You have a month. Go!”

    To accomplish this, I built and textured a few dozen objects in Maya – plants, and lots and lots of different shapes of rocks, mostly. I made a half dozen large tiling textures to go on the ground and cliffs. Then I used our in-house** worldbuilder program in conjunction with a couple of off-the-shelf programs to model and texture the landscape. Lastly, I placed hundreds of rocks and shrubs, along with other art assets made by the other artists.

    By the end, we had a square kilometer of playable area, surrounded by another couple square kilometers of “background” mountains. The area has giant chasms and narrow paths that snake up cliffs, and sand-dunes and all sort of secret narrow places. I think it’s cool. And the whole thing is certainly an ego-trip, because in all of that space, the players and monsters are mere blips!

    Anyway, I had so much fun making a desert that I think you might, too. As far as natural environments go, a desert is a good place to start, because most of the shapes are solid and simple (unlike trees), and you can get away with having a limited number of placed objects.

    ***********Assignment #10 – Rocky Environment***********

    None of this corresponds to a specific game engine. It’s just practice that can be done with Photoshop and a 3D modeling program. If you can adapt this to work with an existing game engine, great! Unfortunately that’s one thing I can’t give you any advice on.

    Part one: concept art. Your assignment is to dream up and communicate a barren, rocky environment for a 3D shooter game. The area must contain one open, arena-type area, with ledges that players can climb up; it can also contain side gullies. Cliffs will keep the players contained. Your first step is to do multiple, quick sketches to develop the color and flavor of the area. Don’t worry about the specifics of the layout yet; your task is to come up with a general desert theme that could be used to make arenas of any number of shapes and sizes. Focus on repeating elements, like large cliff-rocks, or a single cactus which could be used repeatedly throughout the environment. Do one or two more finished pieces when you settle on what specifics you want.

    Part two: modeling and texturing. Now’s the puzzle part. How do you really break that art up into a few objects that can be modeled and textured within a reasonable amount of time? Here’s one way to do it. First, think of the ground and the cliffs. For starters you can make one tiling texture for the ground, and another for the cliffs. Don’t build the actual level just yet – instead, make a small test area to look at while you refine your textures. Make a roughly human-shaped model and pop it in for scale reference.

    You can then take those same textures and make a small series of rocks and platforms that can be placed within your level. Range them in size from human to house. These, and other large elements will effect game-play, so as boring as they are, they are very important.

    Next, make little deco things. These should be from about twice human-height down to knee-height. Again, use your human scale reference. If you make one shrub, you can use the same texture to make three shrubs of varying sizes. The same goes for crystals, cactus, palm trees, whatever. Figure out one or two objects that can be used repeatedly at different scales in your environment.

    Lastly, figure out how to make a sky dome. I’m afraid I can’t give you any pointers on this, because I’ve never had to make one.

    Part three: build the level. Start by drawing a map. Keep it small enough that you can realistically make it. Think about the exact game you want the players to play, and the tactics they will use. Then start building. Get the ground and cliffs made according to the map. Then add the large, gameplay-affecting rocks, and lastly sprinkle with deco objects. Put the sky dome on and light the scene. Take screenshots. Voila, you now have samples in your portfolio from concept art all the way to game level.

    ********#10 Extra Credit*******

    Got a buddy? When the two of you have built your environment assets and made your textures, trade. You each get to build a game level using each other’s work. It will be frustrating at times, as you discover the shortcomings of what your friend has made. When you discover that something just doesn’t work, ask for clarification or revisions.

    This is exactly what you will experience in the industry. The purpose of this drill is both to learn what sort of art works and what doesn’t, and to learn how to communicate. Sometimes is isn’t obvious to the level-builder how an art asset is supposed to be used. It is your responsibility to explain it.




    * An “art asset” is a 3D model that gets placed in a game, such as a tree, or a rock, or a statue of a three-headed dragon.

    ** “In-house” programs are programs which are written right there in the company. Instead of calling up tech support when these programs break, you run across the building and pester the person who wrote the program.
    Last edited by Seedling; October 7th, 2006 at 10:37 AM.

  16. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seedling
    When you were getting started in the games industry, I was getting started in middle school. ;-) Neener neener!

    Got any advice for us kiddies? :-)
    Advice, advice... let's see...

    Just some practical tidbits:

    1. The polygon budget may have a number, but the real budget is as few as possible. If you have a general 2000 polygon limit for terrain and cultural objects, don't make a 2000 polygon stop sign.

    2. If you get the chance to do R&D, take it! You'll be glad you did.

    3. Specialize, but don't forget to learn how the other specialties work. It's a lot easier to build an animatable monster if you understand the animation side of the job. Similarly, it's a lot easier to explain to a modeler what you need changed to make animation easier if you understand the modeling tools.

    4. Learn every appropriate software package you can. Max, Maya, and Lightwave all have different wonderful and horrible bits, and I've used all of them on the same project at different times. Personally, I prefer to model and texture in Lightwave simply because I'm so much faster there than I am in Max or Maya. However, I know enough about the other programs that I can get my Lightwave work into them without a fuss.

    5. Don't leave Painter alone for more than a month or you'll probably have to relearn that damned interface all over again.

    6. If you're freelancing, try to get at least half the money up front. It may help to have a significant other you can sponge off of during lean months too...

    7. Do the environment thing Seedling posted. Companies are getting desperate for good environment monkeys - I've gotten a few headhunter calls for full-time environment jobs and the last environment work I did was a few RTS maps for Mechcommander 2. Personally, I'm better at vehicles & props, so I prefer to look for those kind of gigs.

    8. When it all stops being fun, quit and do something else for a few years. Life's too short to keep working at a job you hate.

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  18. #74
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    Oh, one last thing. If your demo reel is just okay, only the lead artist is likely to see it. If your demo real is fantastic, a few more artists will see it. If your demo reel is amazingly bad, every artist in the building is going to see it.

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    I dont really agree with your disdain for photo references. It is by no means tracing as drawing from life is, although I do agree that drawing from life is much more valuable. I have a friend who is a concept artist at a game company and he says they have a collection of reference photos that they use for their concepts. Most of the time the concept part can only be derived from the imagination anyway, so I don't see the harm of using it for a particular pose or some anatomy. Just my .02.

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