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  1. #286
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    is the thread close oledi???


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  3. #287
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    Thanks a lot for working so much on this thread seedling!
    VatselArt@Gmail.com

    Vatsel.com

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  4. #288
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    I have a dream of working in the game industry as a concept artist. I have trained as an industrial designer in the U.S. and I have practised industrial design for 12 years here in Athens. I am now 37 and I have decided to try and follow my dream and become a concept artist.

    However, Greece does not offer anything like that, therefore, if I get an offer I will have to move away from familly and friends taking my wife with me. I was wondering if you knew anything about how concept artists are hired. Are the jobs usually temporary(on a project by project basis) or are they more full-time? If I have to move around the world every time I have to get a job it is going to be difficult..I will probably need to work for a studio on a more full-time basis. Is that scenario realistic?

    I am getting my portfolio ready as we speak and I will be sending it to many studios around the world. If you want to see what my self taught work is like go to http://spill-blog.blogspot.com or go to my gallery here on CA. I am Stathis. Thanx!

  5. #289
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    Just subscribed to this thread. Good stuff, plus 5 stars!

  6. #290
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    strong basic art skills but no degree

    Hi,
    would you please tell the interested readers out there about the game industry point of view about lack of degree or concept art exp. when they sort through potentials?

    I am aware most want to skip education thinking they can learn all the basics
    on their own. How does the industry feel about this?
    Are they willing to consider one that don't have the degree but have the strong drawing skills?

    I am also aware that, art skill are not the only thing they look for, most times artists are very connected and emotional about their works. They are not motivated or inspired when an assigment comes along that is not to their liking. Is this also a factors as to why the industry want young artist to go to school?
    your advice is most valuable.
    mvstudio

  7. #291
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seedling View Post
    Rogzilla asked me the following:

    While I have heard concept artists daydream of having a separate “concept art department” within a company, I don’t know of any specific companies that run on this model. There are two typical ways that a company is split up: either it is divided into departments by what the employees *do*, i.e. there is an “art department”, a “design” department, or a “foo” department; and when a project gets made they sort-of borrow members from each department. Or a company is split into departments by the *project*. I.E. a company could have the “Evil Island” project, the “Shoot-em Game #254” project, etc. Each project team has its own art team, design team, programming team, etc.

    But what I suspect is most common in the games industry is a combination of the two, in which the development teams are set up to be project-based, and the non-development parts of the company, such as HR, IT, Legal, and Marketing are grouped by what they do.

    While I have heard concept artists daydream of having their own separate concept art team, I am not familiar with any companies that work this way. Frankly, with the exception of very large companies, I suspect it would cause too much friction between the concept artists and the other types of artists to be worthwhile. The “production artists” aren’t an art factory that carry out the orders or the concept artists, and they will resent being treated as if they are. Concept artists and production artists need to work together as a collaborative team. But often this is a bit moot: in many game companies, there is simply not a budget for even one full-time concept artist on a project team. The team is going to have one or more of the production artists do concept art, or they are going to bring in a concept artist from another project team at the same company, before they consider bringing in a freelancer, because bringing in a new employee is expensive and risky.

    To give you some perspective, when I worked at LucasArts, which is a large company by any stretch of the imagination, the concept art for Escape from Monkey Island had been drawn by the lead artist and by one of the modeler/texturers.
    Very, very true.

    One extra thing I'd like to mention is that even the artists that mostly do concept work are expected to know a thing or two about modeling/texturing/animating/pixel art/vector art, etc. The reason for this is so that they can step in and help out as needed AND so they can gel better with the production and development teams. Every project has a different scale and set of goals, and concept art -- at least to a certain extent -- needs to reflect that (especially if bits of it are meant to be used in the game itself).

    I've personally never heard of a full-time/part-time artist being hired by a games company without having some sort of technical expertiese...

  8. #292
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    In the above post from IncubatorGames, re: Seedlings post. . .I'd like to add that "yes" often times at a studio the artists can wear many different hats. When I worked in a production studio, it was a very small studio and I was the dir of animation--but what this really meant was that I lead a small animation team and we also created concet art (drawings, charactor sketches, models, as well as textured, and created all our spfx) we would do what ever we needed to get and complete jobs, I even learned to become an editor. . .BB Edit-then EDit (shows how long ago) At the time I/we had never even heard the term "concept artist" instead we did "previsualization" but looking back concept art and produciotn work was exactly what we did.

    I have a question though. . .I got out of the industry-biggest mistake of my life. I chose a diff career path when I married- now I want to get back into the industry, preferably employed by a game company-no freelance. . .So how? Do I literally knock on doors in San Fran, LA, San Diego, with no appointment? Do I relentlessly email the few people I sort of know? I don't want to offend/burn bridges? I have attended every major art show I can such as APE (alternative press expo, SF), Wondercon SF, Game Developers Conferance (SF), San Diego Comicon, and have met some great people, got some solid input on my portfolio, and have improved after every show. . .but now what? Am I good enough? I think so. And O have studio exp. So how do I get back in?? Thoughts? It is more competetive now, and also I am older is this bad--in my 30's not a kid out of college. I believe I still have A LOT to offer. . .it's what I was made to do. . .

  9. #293
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    This is amaaazing, I love the assignments you've included as well.
    I've only gotten a chance to skim it, but when Winter Break starts, I'll assign myself to self-improvement school and read through all of this.

  10. #294
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    This is awesome Seedling!
    Thanks very much!
    I wish you all the best!
    Sketchbook

    Need to fill this up!
    Finally Finished

    Mostly traditional media.
    Fine Art

    www.jsnzart.com

  11. #295
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    This whole thread is so incredibly helpful!

  12. #296
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    Ditto, very helpful... I'm an Industrial Designer, keen on developing concept art using his wacomand. You find you build up skills but need to focus them on projects.. hey presto,.... thank you for this thread

  13. #297
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    ditto on this - thanks for the resources! Bookmarked it so I can tackle each section thoroughly!

  14. #298
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    Wanwan, agreed! This is really an amazing post in an already amazing thread (Seedling)

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