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  1. #1
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    For Portfolio

    Im a senior in High School and getting started on my portfolio, its late in the game i know but i just really decided that art is what i want. Both peices are undfinished but really need critique, this may become a center for critique fora ll my portfolio peices.

    Taken with a digital camera pretty quickly
    unclutering host

    Last edited by dimi16; December 21st, 2006 at 06:39 PM.
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  3. #2
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    hmm, well I'm glad to hear that art is what you want. It's a very frustrating yet fulfilling field. The first piece to me feels a bit messy. Not so much the lines, but it's a bit hard to tell exactly what's going on there. the second one is good, but it needs more. at this point, it feels alot like an unfinished sketch. try makin the lines a bit darker and adding more shading to it to round it out a bit more. good luck!

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    I undestand your position....just two things you want to consider for your portfolio:

    - Don´t be afraid of contrast, darker tones and cleaner white spaces will help you a lot.

    -Draw your portfolio pieces from reference, is the evaluation standard anyways.


    Good luck, try to use your time wisely.

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    Agreed. The composition of the first one is weak, but I think the large size of the image is probably contributing a lot to that. You should shrink it down so we can see it all without scrolling. If you can, scan it in so we can see the lines better, too.

    Overall, it's a good start. You should probably brush up on your fundamentals; your rendering looks pretty weak, and your linework is sketchy.
    CA.org wiki
    Lots to learn in there.

    Good luck and keep us posted.

    EDIT: What kind of portfolio are you looking to make? Frem these it looks like illustration?

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    You have a good start to your future. You have imagination and that will carry you far. What art school will give you are the skill sets that you need to make your vision of what you want to create come alive. There are two types of training. One the four year degree at a traditional college, second the dedicated art school which can offer you a four year degree as well as assoicate degrees 2, 3 years worth of education. The traditional school will give you the book learning, the art school the hands on skill development. It's up to you to choose, whats near you, cost etc. I have both a BS and a BFA from a traditional and then an art school. Each has it's advantages.

    I can relate to you about changing your mind. Don't ever feel you are trapped in your career goals. My son was going to be an aerospace engineer and after being in shool one month says he wants to an artist like his Dad. Oh well...there goes my in-law suite at his mansion...

    My best piece of advice is this, draw something everyday. Draw the people you see, get a sketch book, fill them up every page. Don't cross out anything or tear out pages. Draw, Draw, Draw, to make that muscle strong.

    Stay Hungry

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    i think im going to scratch the first one and use nib and ink on the second one to clean up the lines. Thoughts?
    The first one sorta just came out with out much thinking so i think thats why its so messy. Im much more of a cartoonist than anything else so i think thats why my fundementals are weak. Im going to bring a sketch book to school with me and draw every class.

    Last edited by dimi16; December 21st, 2006 at 06:39 PM.
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    I would seriously not use Whale Dates a Lighthouse for your portfolio. The composition is not very effective in conveying an idea (except chaos) and sends the eye all over the place, jumping here and there and all over. Look up some of the points for generating a good composition (Loomis is always a good place).

    And since your stuff is leaning on the cartoony side of the store, you would really profit from this site: http://sevencamels.blogspot.com/.

    Also, like many have already said: draw from life, draw from reference, draw everyday, draw whenever you can, draw as much as you can, draw, draw, draw.

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    okay yes this is a portfolio for illustration.
    My fubndementals are most definitly weak, ive taken one art class at highschool and it was just and introductory drawing class freshman year. Heres something else im concepting at the moment... thoughts?
    For Portfolio

    thanks
    Dimi

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    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Oaksford
    Even for illustration, you will probably need even stronger foundations then for a good art school. They don't care so much about your current illustrative abilities- That's what they HELP you with. They just want you to be able to draw from life well.

    And if it's for a career, not a college, then you should save up for adobe illustrator. I highly doubt crayon will get you an illustration job.
    Illustrator? Don't you mean Photoshop? Maybe if he wanted to do design stuff... or maybe Illustrator is used for more actual illustration than I think

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    im sorry if i didnt make it clear enough but that ws just a concept and the colored pencil was used just to test out colors, it was done in my sketchbook

    Since im new at this whole art school thing itd be gret if someone could explian exzactly what they want in a portfolio for an illustration program. Maybe someone from SVA, SCAD, or some similar school.

    thanks

    p.s. i do have photoshop which i use for illustrations but i like to keep all my concepts in paper and pencil

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  12. #11
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    People have already told you- they want to see you draw from life, nude models, draped models, still lives, landscapes, etc.

    And I assume anyone over 12 who likes art already has photoshop... Illustrator is good for vector things though, it depends what feild of illustration I guess.


    Actually ilaekae, I think it's just when we think illustration, we think of that His Dark Materials stuff Nox did- not logos or editorial stuff or wutev.

    Last edited by Justin.; September 9th, 2006 at 03:19 PM.
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    Rhineville, Illustrator is actually used more than PS in the illustration field when you consider the entire graphics industry. Has been since it came out. Using PS for simple spot illustrations and anything approaching technical or cartoon/most editorial art is like using a hammer to open a jar of pickles. There are exceptions, of course, but time is a factor, and so is the ability to work without worrying about raster/size conflicts. And anyone who attempts a logo for general application in PS is an idiot. Even some artists who appear to work only in PS as a finish will start their work in Illustrator to speed up production...


    ["...let the wars begin..." he thought, after realizing he just posted in a forum where PS and Painter are worshipped as gods...]

    No position or belief, whether religious, political or social, is valid if one has to lie to support it.--Alj Mary

    Ironically, the concept of SIMPLICITY is most often misunderstood by simple-minded people. --Alj Mary
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  14. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ilaekae
    Rhineville, Illustrator is actually used more than PS in the illustration field when you consider the entire graphics industry. Has been since it came out. Using PS for simple spot illustrations and anything approaching technical or cartoon/most editorial art is like using a hammer to open a jar of pickles. There are exceptions, of course, but time is a factor, and so is the ability to work without worrying about raster/size conflicts. And anyone who attempts a logo for general application in PS is an idiot. Even some artists who appear to work only in PS as a finish will start their work in Illustrator to speed up production...


    ["...let the wars begin..." he thought, after realizing he just posted in a forum where PS and Painter are worshipped as gods...]
    Ahhhh yes silly me. When I think Illustration I have the warped romantic scene of bookcovers and such... plus I haven't spent a lot of time in Illustrator at all (stupid strike at school cut it out of my design intro semester) but yes, thinking back I remember my instructors portfolio pieces that were mainly done in Illustrator.

    And yes, I have tried making logos in PS (I don't have Illustrator) and it's a big ol pain.

    But wouldn't Dimi also benefit from working in PS? It seems like he prefers loose drawing instead of more technical and stylish pieces. (I'm asking for him and for myself )

    EDIT: and no wars from me. I'm a design student and I know Photoshop falls flat on it's face in certain areas. Also I see great stuff from people done in Illustrator all the time here, I just don't know what it's like to draw in it is all.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dimi16
    Since im new at this whole art school thing itd be gret if someone could explian exzactly what they want in a portfolio for an illustration program. Maybe someone from SVA, SCAD, or some similar school.
    From SVA's site:
    Portfolio Requirements

    Composition, light, form, and spatial relations. The ways in which an applicant addresses these issues are important considerations in all SVA portfolio reviews. They become especially important to the stories being told by Illustration majors.

    Drawing and painting provide an immediate form of communication for artists and can readily demonstrate an applicant’s story-telling abilities. As such, applicants seeking admission to the Department of Illustration are asked to submit 15 to 20 pieces of recent work that includes drawing and color work and offers a look at their storytelling skills and experiences in these areas.

    Direct Observation Work
    Work done from or based upon the direct observation of life is strongly recommended for inclusion in Illustration portfolios. This type of work requires the applicant to interpret the three-dimensional world in two-dimensional terms. It also places the reviewer on a common ground with the artist. This allows for a discussion and critique of the work and the creative process in a context and experience that is familiar to both parties. Examples of this work can include self-portraits (using a mirror for reference), figure drawings, object studies, still lifes, interior scenes, and landscapes.

    Reference Work
    Copying work from two-dimensional references (like photographs or magazines) can be useful when learning to work with a specific tool or medium. However, once confidence is gained with that tool or medium, the individual should begin working from the direct observation of life. Otherwise, the reviewer will learn much about the technical skills of the applicant and little about their creative problem solving skills. This is due to the fact that the author of the reference image has already made the important decisions. It is recommended that work done from two-dimensional references be kept to a minimum.

    Fantasy Work
    Work done solely from the imagination can offer helpful insights into the way in which an applicant deals with issues of composition, light, form, and spatial relations. Unfortunately, this work can often lead to a one-sided conversation and success can rest too much on the degree to which an applicant can control these elements. This type of exploration is encouraged but should also be supported by direct observation experience.

    Comics and Cartoons
    Cartooning applicants are encouraged to share their "professional" interests and abilities with the College. Applicants who publish their own zines, create graphic novels, or run their own strips should include these as part of their portfolio. However, applicants should be careful not to overload their portfolios with images of comic or cartoon characters. Though character development is essential to success in the illustration world, the ability to take objects (people, places, things) that exist in the real, three-dimensional world and place them believably in the two-dimensional picture plane is key at this point. This potential is better demonstrated at the point of admission by direct observation work.

    Computer Work
    Design projects and computer-generated images can be included in a portfolio. However, applicants must be careful that the work submitted is not so much about what a computer program can do but what the applicant can do with a computer program. It is recommended that this type of work be kept to a minimum and is submitted in conjunction with drawing, painting, and/or sculpture.



    Tristan Elwell
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    Rhineville: yes im more into the drawing over technical stuff but i have done some 3d graphics and video game graphics in my short time.

    Elwell thanks for that, i had seen it but i was looking more for peoples personal experiences etc.

    this is some human form stuff
    For Portfolio

    i think im gonna start a sketch book (on CA) to work on it but yeah anything else anyone wants to say is appreciated

    thanks
    Dimi

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  17. #16
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    More...
    From Art Center's site:
    Illustration
    Submit life and figure drawings from live models. Other observational drawings from life are also important. Include imaginative drawings and design concepts in color and black and white. Include pieces that convey a story or concept. Emphasis is placed on observational drawing skills as well as personal expression and conceptual development. Sketchbooks can be a helpful addition.
    From Ringling's site:
    Representational drawing is an integral part of CORE Studio Program for all majors. We recommend that half of your portfolio should consist of drawings from direct observation.
    Are you starting to see a pattern?
    Also, check out http://www.npda.org/


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
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  18. #17
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    Bridgman is great, but not enough. You've got to look at the real thing.

    Last edited by Elwell; January 15th, 2011 at 12:05 AM.

    Tristan Elwell
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    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
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    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
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    i would really love to but my school doesnt have access to that sort of thing and neither does anywhere remotely close to me. the only option would be for me to enroll into a uconn class (university of connecticut), im not quite sure if i could do that, how did you guys develop a portfolio from observation while in hs, it seems a little unfair to those with less money and resources at their fingertips (like myself) my art department is decent but nothing that can develop a portfolio or anywhere near it, the classes are a waste of time and everything is done from photographs of your self or is a still life. neither of which i find to be very helpfull.
    thoughts hints etc?
    thanks
    dimi

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    Quote Originally Posted by dimi16
    how did you guys develop a portfolio from observation while in hs, it seems a little unfair to those with less money and resources at their fingertips (like myself) my art department is decent but nothing that can develop a portfolio or anywhere near it
    Well honestly, I don't think you should be cocerned with a portfolio. I know you need to present one for uni, but I think you should be working on gaining skill. Money and resources = observational greatness? What are you talking about? I don't know if I misunderstood you or what.... any still life has the potential for being a great piece.

    the classes are a waste of time and everything is done from photographs of your self or is a still life
    Guess what I'm drawing right now to help build up my technical skill, and guess what you should be doing more of

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    what i meant more was i dont have the access to nude models infront of me.... what im going to do is start to sketch people in class as much as i can. you see my issue is ive been drawing cartoons for along time but just recently realized its what i want to do.. so ive never had any training beyond what i learned with a pencil in paper while in class (in a boring class like history) or at home, i never really considered dabbling in the more finearts side of things, and its sort of a scary step for me. Im going to keep up useing my anatomy books i just bought and im just gonna draw as much as possible, which would be great if i had more time, but my deadline to create a portfolio is fast approching and im not sure what i should do. i love to draw but dont have the skills others have developed over time. has anyone else had to cope with this?

    Dimi

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  22. #21
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    If you are in highschool like myself, you have plenty of free time. You have a mirror, you have some sort of paper (Sketchbooks at Wal-mart are no more than 3.50, some .7 mechancial pencils are 10 for 2.45) and pencils, then you have live reference. Do many self portraits, and draw your hands. Since december of 2004 I have gone through about 25, 70 SHEET sketchbooks, front and back of every page. Alongside what I'm doing now, that's about 3700 drawings in under 2 years. I have been at it since 9th grade, I have learned to cope with it. I don't do many still lives and I don't have access to nude figures, but I seem to be working out pretty well. Quit bitching, start drawing. As one pro said at the workshop,

    "The more you are THERE(Conceptart.org), the less you are HERE(Among other artists)

    Meaning- go draw instead of complaining about your resources.

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  23. #22
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    Draw your shoes.
    Draw your hand.
    Draw the corner of your room.
    Draw the view out your window.
    Draw the inside of your closet.
    Pick a recipe from a cookbook, assemble and draw the ingredients.
    Draw yourself.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
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    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
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  24. #23
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    word thanks guys im gonna get on it and start a sketchbook thread
    see more of me there hopefully the college search works out

    i have a new sketchbook thread in that section now hopefully ill keep with daily updates

    Last edited by dimi16; September 9th, 2006 at 05:56 PM.
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  25. #24
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    I love the cookbook idea (probably because of its association with eating).

    On a completely different vein, the two main reasons that history is considered boring:
    a) the teacher drones on, and his voice is physically unpleasant
    b) the student isn't using his imagination

    It's usually b.

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    agreed agreed b is what does it, and i think im going to use the cookbook idea later this week in a still life practice,
    anyways i hope you guys wil check out my sketchbook and give me good critiques and life lessons there
    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthr...highlight=dimi

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