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  1. #1
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    I might be working for this company...

    Hey guys. Recently, I saw this AD where they're looking for pencillers. The AD looked interesting enough so I decided to submit some samples vie email, and the told me to come by next week for an interview and a penciller test. The thing is, there is not enough information on the AD on what the pencillers will be doing, but according to some information I picked up, this company does mostly storyboards. So I get the feeling that the test might be related to that. I'm just wondering if you guys can give some help on what I should work on for the test if it has something to do storyboarding. I really want to get this job. The financial situation here is not looking good.

    Storyboarders out there, HELP!

    THANKS A LOT.


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  3. #2
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    I am not in the main to say this. I would suggest they will give you an outline in witch you will have to do a quick wip up of the charchters and story board? Plot, design, etc... Or they may even give you some reference pictures and you have to go from there...

    Seth.n

  4. #3
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    when i read the brief, as i go from shot to shot, i try to picture what it would look like if you were watching it in tv. i watch TONS of television, and im always suprised at how easily it is to visualize a shot because of that. so watch lots of movies and tv, and try to pay attantion to how tehy pimp camera angles to best tell the story. good luck dood!-c36

  5. #4
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    Storyboard tests are usually given as take home tests after the interview. I'm not sure what a penciler test is...but it doesn't sound like its for storyboards. Maybe comics? If this is a storyboard test concerned about your pencil quality I would recommend keeping your line quality loose and fast, but readable. And do what Coro was saying, better yet, watch black and white movies and sketch from them. You'll learn more about lighting that way. Given that these storyboards arn't for webpage graphics, but for characters, some acting may be involved in your presentation. Rent the Movie Shrek and look at the special features where they pitch their boards, for a good example. Also, Check out Mark Andrews work. He is one of the best storyboard artists alive today. He is the guy who gave the advice about drawing from black and white movies. Hope this helps. Best of Luck to ya.

  6. #5
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    There are also huge differences in storyboarding for animation and storyboarding for film. For film, you'd be doing about one drawing per camera move, while in animation, you drawing one drawing for almost every keyframe.

    Heres some great examples of awesome film storyboards: http://www.tedbstudio.com/films/index.html


    If this is animation storyboards, then you can find all of pixar's storyboards on their dvds.

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by aesir
    There are also huge differences in storyboarding for animation and storyboarding for film. For film, you'd be doing about one drawing per camera move, while in animation, you drawing one drawing for almost every keyframe.

    Heres some great examples of awesome film storyboards: http://www.tedbstudio.com/films/index.html


    If this is animation storyboards, then you can find all of pixar's storyboards on their dvds.

    Aesir, thanks for the awesome link! here is the company website : http://www.storyboardsonline.com/home.asp to give you an idea.

  8. #7
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    Britt, Coro, Seth:

    THanks for the help and encouragement. Time to practice.

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by aesir
    For film, you'd be doing about one drawing per camera move, while in animation, you drawing one drawing for almost every keyframe.

    .
    There isn't a difference. Boarding every key frame of an animation is a lot of time and unecessary work. it's a common mistake amatuer animators make, as well, thinking they could create key frames from the poses they've made in the boarding stage, or doing all their "key poses" in the animatic... which makes no sense because you'll have to re-draw them anyway. each camera shot will have several key frames, but only one is needed to extract the main idea.

    you only need to draw all of the key poses when you are actually animating the film, not during pre-production when you're just figuring out the pace of the movie.

    storyboarding for animation is the same as film.

  10. #9
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    a good link would be CA resident dan milligan's page:

    http://www.danmilligan.com/

    and here's small tutorial made by Dan:

    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=61594

    helped me a lot...

    cheers,
    Etienne

    "How do you know you're good enough?" "You know." "What if you're wrong?" "You find out."

    *** Help a CA artist! Visit the Critique Center! ***

    MY HOMEPAGE

  11. #10
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    There are a couple lessons on storyboarding at Animation Meat by Brad Bird and Chris Roman. Focuses on TV animation for the Simpsons and King of the Hill but they have pretty good tips in them.

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