Shadows and highlights...

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  1. #1
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    Red face Shadows and highlights...

    Hey guys, I'm new here (bet you've heard that over and over)
    I need some help with my shadowing and highlights. This is my weakest aspect of my art. I'm posting an image I have recently worked on and still think the shadows/highlights.

    EDIT: posted smaller image...

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  3. #2
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    I'm not an expert on it either. If it is of any help it looks as if your creature is evenly lit. That might be true and what you were going for, but it makes it look flat, and doesn't pop out.

    Like the horns are nearly the same, and so the one on the left can either be in the background, or in the middle of the head. It's logical to say background, but how it's lit only makes me rely on logic, and not the actual shading provided.

    I hope that helps, I'm sure someone else can help yout out better than I can.

    Just trying to get out of browsing the lounge tonight.

    edit: try thinking of a more dominating light source? Only other thing that pops in to my mind.

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    paintover

    Hi Transmission Fluid -
    Hope you don't mind, I did a 30 second paintover - it's pretty shite, but I hope it illustrates my point when I say right now, your shadows and highlights are not really helping to define the form of the animal - they are a very pretty bit of rendering, but they are rather arbitrary in theor placement in the picture.

    Attachment 14023

    Where is your light coming from? Is it hard or diffused? Is it warm or cool? Will it bounce off the floor and walls onto the animal's underside?
    These are all questions to ask yourself.
    You have a really 'clean' style - I like it and you obviously know how to apply 'paint' in the computer, it just looks like you need to think a bit more about what light does when it falls on an object, before applying all of those lovingly rendered brushstrokes.
    If you don't know enough about light, look for Jason Manleys thread on light - it is excellent. Look at Mullins and Sparth - both great with lighting. Coro does lovely lighting too. How do they light objects?
    Go and find out!
    Ciao for now
    Jonathan

    Last edited by Standing; September 7th, 2006 at 05:50 PM.
    Cheers,
    Jonathan

    www.jonathanstanding.com

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  5. #4
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    Hi!

    I would say first of all, to be more selective with the lines you keep from the original drawing when you go into shading an image. Right now in yours, some of the lines you have are redundant and not really necessary. It competes with the shading. Standing did away with some of your lines in his paintover, so you see what I mean.

    Temperature is also something to consider in shading. It can add a lot to the mood and can really make your image pop. For example, a light source like the sun will make colors warmer while the shadows will appear cooler. All your values are the same hue, so try pushing the shadows more towards purple and add some warmer reds and oranges in the lit areas.

    Hope that helps

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    I know nothing about colour, so I'll comment on the rendering - the part I have the greatest issue with.

    Like I say to other people - treat shadow and shade with the same importance as the line, proportion etc. I think you need to take a step back from colour and do studies with pencil and charcol and critically look at the way light acts on form.

    I got this great excerpt from a Robert W. Gill book on perspective "Light is needed to see and object, but in reality, it is only the shades and shadows created by light that are used in the rendering of an object". So, learn what shadows and shades are and be really critical when you render an object.

    Some pointers -
    - choose a your light source and stick to it
    - make use of reflected light.
    - use a greater range of values
    - use shade and shadow in your work, but make it clear what is what

    Hope that helps

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    Admitedly establishing a light source is something I often fail to do with my images...
    Illustrating the image has helped alot, and I thank you for that. I guess I have to work better with different forms of light, especially when an environment is lacking in the image.
    Again thank you

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pan
    Hi!

    I would say first of all, to be more selective with the lines you keep from the original drawing when you go into shading an image. Right now in yours, some of the lines you have are redundant and not really necessary. It competes with the shading. Standing did away with some of your lines in his paintover, so you see what I mean.

    Temperature is also something to consider in shading. It can add a lot to the mood and can really make your image pop. For example, a light source like the sun will make colors warmer while the shadows will appear cooler. All your values are the same hue, so try pushing the shadows more towards purple and add some warmer reds and oranges in the lit areas.

    Hope that helps

    Yes, this also helps. I am rather selective with my colours and end up restricting myself. Thank you. I'll definantly try these out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alcian
    I know nothing about colour, so I'll comment on the rendering - the part I have the greatest issue with.

    Like I say to other people - treat shadow and shade with the same importance as the line, proportion etc. I think you need to take a step back from colour and do studies with pencil and charcol and critically look at the way light acts on form.

    I got this great excerpt from a Robert W. Gill book on perspective "Light is needed to see and object, but in reality, it is only the shades and shadows created by light that are used in the rendering of an object". So, learn what shadows and shades are and be really critical when you render an object.

    Some pointers -
    - choose a your light source and stick to it
    - make use of reflected light.
    - use a greater range of values
    - use shade and shadow in your work, but make it clear what is what

    Hope that helps

    Hey thanks! These pointers are extremely helpful. Thank you

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  10. #9
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    Sorry if its been said, but for the most part try to avoid complete profile like that.

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  11. #10
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    Everything has pretty much been said. I noticed that the creature is predomitately red except for the splash of purple on the horns and head. Maybe possibly work that into some other parts of the body. The shading (as everyone has commented) is pretty neutral. The way the pose is it's hard to tell that there is another front leg in the background. I think it's a pretty interesting creature concept. Just a bit on the plain side so far.

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  12. #11
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    everything you need to know about the rendering has been said, i guess.But about the anatomy, check those front legs structure, and use some ref (dog anatomy could help a lot).Nice design.But if you really HAVE to do a full profile view (almost ortographic) i suggest to place all the feet on the same ground plane

    ciao

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