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  1. #1
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    Red face Any feedback is welcome

    These are some of my drawings. I've started to draw two years ago and until recently, this was only a good way to spend my free time. But now I've started to think more seriously about the possibility of making a living out of it and I want to go to an art university next year. I haven't taken any drawing lessons and I know I have a lot of catching up to do but I'm willing to do my best. So, I'm waiting for your honest opinion.

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    Last edited by Deya08; August 2nd, 2006 at 11:44 AM.
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  2. #2
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    i dont see any images

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    I know...I'm working on it Are they too big? Should I make them smaller?

    Last edited by Deya08; August 2nd, 2006 at 11:35 AM.
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    fantasitic, in terms of technigue and facility. but masses are not not solid enough. i know pencil has a limited amount of tones to use compared to charcoal or paint, but you have limited your range even more so. this is probably becuase of the effect from photograpy as it tends to flatted the image and is doen even more so when drawn. have you tried to set up your own model to draw from life? try it with north light or a strong light source. that way you expand your tone range, thus having your forms feel more solid. try to establish a lower key image as well, which means everything would be toned much darker leaving the parts of extreme high light brighter and giving much more range for your forms to turn into and out of space.

    - Kinjark
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    Well, by being able to draw what you see, you are a good chunk ahead of many young artists. And while these are very nice and technically accomplished, they lack a certain soul... Perhaps they are just a little too close to the source material. Replicating camera work can often make stuff seem like that.

    My challenge to you would be to draw something from reference (something relatively simple, like a face which is not at a strange angle), then draw it again without the reference.

    That will really tell you how you're doing with your observation skills.

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    Yeah, Dogfood is exactly right. It can be difficult to get past the mechanical reproduction aspect of using reference. While photos "look" right, if you actually examine them closely you'll notice they tend to distort and flatten. Work on creating structure, depth, and feeling to your pieces, which is what these lack.

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    i think what most of these people are saying is that you should use more shadowing... or make the shadows u got darker.

    but anyways, the pictures are real nice. too me they feel real "humany" i dont know how to explain it. i tihnk u are a great candidate for art school. go ahead and persue it, but if u do make sure u pursue it with a passion to be the best.

    the pencil work is very very nice. very good hair structure. try to use different medium. try the digital painting thing. its fun and sumthin brand new. or go and buy some paint. digital art is cheaper too me... unless u buy a expensive drawing tablet and the expensive programs. u can go buy a tablet for like 50 bucks (maybe cheaper). and there are cheap art programs out there. u dont have to go get those 300-400$ programs. search for "Alias Sketchbook" and if digital aint your thing try charcoals and shit. those are fun.

    i see u dont like to draw ears. am i right? if u dont know how to draw them, dont think u can get away with hiding them forever. practice them from pictures or sumthin.

    my favorite picture is the last one. the highlights in the hair look good. the left nostril is kinda funny tho. but overall, very nice work on all them pictures.

    good luck in the art career

    - Sick.L
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    Im curious do you have any peices that are original, just straight from your own imagination.

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    Thank you guys for your advices! Although some of you said that I have a great technique, the truth is that I actually don't have one. I don't know yet any technique terms because nobody explained me all the things that I should know to make a good and realistic drawing. I simply draw what I see. A professor told me and I was kinda surprised to hear that when I draw a portrait, I should first draw the bone structure, the muscles and at the end, the skin and all the other details. And speaking of shadows...I try to avoid to make the shadows too dark because I'm afraid that I will ruin the drawing. I put a lot of work on them and it would be a pity to ruin them when I'm almost done.
    And like you said Kinjark, pencils have a limited amount of tones. Even though I have pencils from 5H to 8B, I use for shadowing only 2 or 3 different pencils, which I think they will make a good shadow. I haven't tried yet to use charcoal but I'm going to.
    I will keep that in mind Dogfood and I will try these days to draw something from reference. Yeah, this is a big challenge for me! Almost all of my drawings are made after photos. But I'll try and see how it turns out

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    Quote Originally Posted by Deya08
    Thank you guys for your advices! Although some of you said that I have a great technique, the truth is that I actually don't have one. I don't know yet any technique terms because nobody explained me all the things that I should know to make a good and realistic drawing. I simply draw what I see. A professor told me and I was kinda surprised to hear that when I draw a portrait, I should first draw the bone structure, the muscles and at the end, the skin and all the other details. And speaking of shadows...I try to avoid to make the shadows too dark because I'm afraid that I will ruin the drawing. I put a lot of work on them and it would be a pity to ruin them when I'm almost done.
    And like you said Kinjark, pencils have a limited amount of tones. Even though I have pencils from 5H to 8B, I use for shadowing only 2 or 3 different pencils, which I think they will make a good shadow. I haven't tried yet to use charcoal but I'm going to.
    I will keep that in mind Dogfood and I will try these days to draw something from reference. Yeah, this is a big challenge for me! Almost all of my drawings are made after photos. But I'll try and see how it turns out
    good for you! but you should understand that limiting yourself has already destroyed your image. the truly great artist doesnt concern himself with fear. only what he can see and draw. ruining something out of expiermenting is much better then never doing the expirment to begin with. and you wont get it on the first try either. it may take years to perfect. but if you put yourself into it you get it eventually. look at this figure study from Prudhon and study how he uses his full range of toned paper, charcoal and white chalk.

    a master of course but he continued to study his ENTIRE life while others were satified with where they were at. there is no end to your porgress. except when you say so.

    - Kinjark
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    Well...yeah, you're right Kinjark. I know that if I won't try something new I won't give myself the chance to evolve, to develop my skills. But, like I've said, I've never thought taking my "hobby" seriously. I've drawed just for fun and because it made me happy. It was my family and friends who told me to do something about my talent because I've always thought that I wasn't good enough and I drawed only for my own pleasure. That's why I hadn't try harder because I was satisfied with my work. And only 2 months ago I've changed my mind and decided to go to a art college. So, I didn't had enough time to experiment and learn new things. But I will take some drawing lessons starting September and I hope I will be well prepared for the entrance examianation to college, which will be next year, in July.
    It's great in deed this art piece of Prudhon. I will look for some more of his work on the internet. Thank you!

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  12. #12
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    yes that he is! im happy that you will go for some education, i was unaware that you treated your art not so serious. are you serious about your art now? im alittle confused.
    Edit : oops silly me thats right you already said you were taking it serious now.

    - Kinjark
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