Jin- can you recommend a basic set of brushes to start out with?

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  1. #1
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    Jin- can you recommend a basic set of brushes to start out with?

    Hello,

    I've read a lot of your advice on the forums and want to thank you for how much it has helped. Painter is a deep program and your explanations have prevented me from pulling half the hair out of my head.

    I'm hoping you will have a helpful suggestion regarding the brushes. I'm getting bogged down by too many variations. I've built loads of custom palletes by now and find that each one has its limitations. For the most part, I think there are just too many variables for me to get a handle on right away. I need a flexible pallete of about 5 or 6 basic brushes that will allow me to build a basic painting. Can you recommend some guidelines to building a brush with the optimum amount of flexibility?

    Many thanks!

    "The progress of learning is from indefinite to definite, not from sensation to perception. We do not learn to have percepts but to differentiate them."
    J.J Gibson
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  3. #2
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    Hi,

    Thanks for the kind words.

    Sorry to say that I can't give you a basic set of 5 or 6 brush variants to give you the kind of flexibility you, as an individual will want.

    It just takes time, experimentation, and practice to learn which brush variants and which brush control adjustments will work best for the way you want to paint and the kind of painting you want to do.

    You'll find lists of artists' favorite Pianter brushes here and there on the Web but that won't mean they're your favorites.

    For starters, take a look at the list of older version brush variants Ryan Church uses.

    http://www.ryanchurch.com/03HIW.htm

    This list contains brush variants in older Painter versions that you'll also find in Painter IX (IX 9.1 and IX.5) or on the Painter IX CD but some of them are not in the same brush categories so I'll list them and tell you where to find them:

    • Square Chalk - Chalk category
    • Digital Airbrush - Airbrushes category
    • Frosty Water - Painter IX CD in the following folder: CPainterIX > Extras > Brushes > Painter 5 Brushes > Water (brush category folder)
    • Water Rake - Painter IX CD in the following folder: CPainterIX > Extras > Brushes > Painter 5 Brushes > Water (brush category folder)
    • Camel Hair - The correct name for this variant is Camel Hair Brush - 'Painter IX CD in the following folder: CPainterIX > Extras > Brushes > Painter 5 Brushes > Brushes (brush category folder)
    • Glow - F/X category
    • Water Color - This is an entire brush category and though you'll find it on the Painter IX CD in the Extras > Brushes > Painter 5 Brushes > Water Color folder, if you add that brush category to your Painter IX > Brushes > Painter Brushes brush library folder, the brush variants won't work as they did in Painter 5/5.5 or in Painter 6. Instead, they'll work like Painter 7, Painter 8, and Painter IX Watercolor variants. You don't need them anyway because all of these brush variants are included in the Painter IX Digital Watercolor brush category and those brush variants do work as intended. Here's a list of the pertinent Digital Watercolor variants:
      • Broad Water Brush
      • Diffuse Water
      • Flat Water Blender
      • Pure Water Brush
      • Round Water Blender
      • Simple Water
      • Splatter Water
    • Eraser - This, too, is a brush category containing multiple brush variants. Painter IX.5, however, has an all purpose Eraser tool added to the Tools palette that can be used to erase anything (i.e. dry paint, wet paint, Liquid Ink, etc.). That gives you a wide choice but it shouldn't be hard to find the Eraser variants you like best.



    Or take a look at Rob Chang's favorites (scroll down to the link named "Rob's custom Painter brushes (updated 11-30-2005)" and read the text below that link):

    http://www.ethereality.info/ethereal..._page/home.htm


    Ultimately, even if these two artists' favorite brushes give you a boost, you'll do best by continuing to find what works best for you.


    Don't be discouraged if it takes time. That's true for everyone unless they settle for one brush and use it for everything. That doesn't sound like much fun!

    Please do not PM me with Painter questions. Instead, post them here where everyone can benefit from them. Thanks!

    Jinny Brown
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    and The PainterFactory
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  5. #3
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    a lot of good artists use the normal oil pastells. I always thought it is a neat brush to start with and I had a look at your sketchbook and I think you could get used to it easily.
    Anyway... Brushes are a personal thing. Like the sword of a samurai... You need the brush that fits your painting style.
    Jin was totally right with that.

    ▄▀▄▀▄▀■ - GORILLA ARTFARE - ■▀▄▀▄▀▄
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    Thank you for the thoughtful advice Jin and Zaknafain. You've helped narrow down the playingfield for now and I'll remember your point that it is important to find the right brush for my own method of working.

    I found that oils can even be applied in varying opacities and this seems to produce more predictable results than the digital watercolor medium, at least for me. It's a little strange to see the result of watercolor being applied directly onto oil (a bizarre concept in real life) but I think I understand the principle- (values darken when a medium is applied on top of dry pigment because of partial saturation) It's really weird though to be able to paint luminosity directly on top of darkened areas- this completely flies against the laws of physical painting.

    Ah well, I'm probably overthinking this but I'd like to understand the logic behind all of this instead of just figuring out some recipe. But I realize that I'm a better artist than technician so I should probably just get on with painting.

    Thanks again- this has really helped.

    "The progress of learning is from indefinite to definite, not from sensation to perception. We do not learn to have percepts but to differentiate them."
    J.J Gibson
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