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  1. #121
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    Here's how far I have gotten at painting in the larger detail features on this big sucker. Sorry about the tree shadow. Perhaps you can imagine how challenging it is to handle a wet oil of this size, and yet it is too dark in the garage to get a good image of its development. This is probably about 11 hours of painting since I posted the underpainting. The thing I am learning with this painting is just how much time and paint goes into a large scale work. It's pretty surprising.
    Last edited by arttorney; January 1st, 2007 at 07:17 PM.


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  3. #122
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    I went to a hockey game and drew instead of drinking on New Yews Eve. Here is some of that.
    Attachment 72146

    This is my hand, from between mediations today.
    Attachment 72147

  4. #123
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    I estimate about another 12 to 15 hours work remain on this.

  5. #124
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    No, no, no! I meant the thread gets a ridiculous amount of neglect, there should be crits and comments flying around the place, but theres not...
    The last peice has really nice scale to it, keep working man!

  6. #125
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    Thank you. I got in another 2.5 hours of putting light places in the hills of the deep places of the Grand Canyon (middle painting region) tonight, plus another tint of green pine tree needles laid in. I'll probably paint 2 or 3 hours tomorrow morning before the next time the light is good to photograph the painting. I think I'll try to do a little post production on the brightness of the next image. some of the subtleties are getting lost in the translation.

  7. #126
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    This is about 4.5 hours of work since the last image.

  8. #127
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    Good work so far just watch for plateaus and make certain the light is uni directional.

    Btw, I used some of christopher hart's stuff too. I recogonize some of his work in your earlier pages.

    And believe you me people do pass through but if they dont see figure drawing batman robin or the latest hotty then some dont reply.

    Also the mediums you use are out of many people comfort zones. It like a career Semitruck driver would be hardpressed to crit a seasoned motorcyclist
    same here. The crits seem to go up when you work with people's comfort zones.

    But we do watch *wink*
    TheRoad

    Transition from Art Critic to Artiste - Diligence, that's all I need.

  9. #128
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    I had gotten that Christopher Hart book long before I came on CA because even by self assessment I was able to see that figures and characters were the last and worst challenge for me. I also will blend rather than hatch any day of the week, and he hatches well. I knew I needed some help with that mysterious process.

    When I began to get the inevitable input concerning my anatomy issues it was naturally easier to pick up the book I already had rather than go out and find Hogarth/Loomis et al. It's over 100 miles to the nearest real art store, although the NAU bookstore might have had those (a mere 89 miles away).

    What? You mean the people on Conceptart.org are not doing woodcuts and bolting wire brushes on oil paintings? Seriously, At my age I've long ago gotten used to some of the drawbacks of marching to your own drummer. Even Machiavelli way back when talked about all the stuff you have to put up with if you are not doing the same thing as everybody else is. I am on here so I can get better at CA friendly media, rather than to get CA to go along with me. I'll be all right. I'll be around to the sketchbooks of Asoir and NicoRaven sometime this week and I'll probably check back in with some of my old friends. I do appreciate those crits and comments that come in, no matter how much of a smart ass I can sometimes be. In the first page of my sketchbook I averaged 12 visits per post. In this third page I have broken the 16 per post overall mark a couple of times. I am probably the biggest math dork on these forums but it allows me to see the improvement in a way even if nobody comments. (I used to be a technical development scientist. I can't help myself.)

    I did some drawing today, but it seriously looks like crap. Tomorrow at 11:00 A.M. mountain time I'll put up the Grand Canyon again, with about 4 hours more of pine needles.
    Last edited by arttorney; January 8th, 2007 at 11:29 PM.

  10. #129
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    It just goes on and on and on, I know. This week I'll have some WIPs for some community activities I'm interested in. I'm finally about done with this giant painting.

  11. #130
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    That painting is coming along. I have to find the time to practice traditional more often.

  12. #131
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    hey good stuff man, I like the texture of the plant in the foreground a lot on that last one. I think one thing that you need to do in most of your paintings is to push the contrast in your values a lot more. Keep updating man!

  13. #132
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    Good painting. Interesting direction. Don't stop sketching. Let's go.
    Sketchbook

    Don't miss the rise

    This is actually Wolverine's sketchbook

  14. #133
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    All my community activities ideas this week involve curvilinear perspective. This one (IDW) has a wide value range I hope.
    Attachment 77275

    I'm sketching now, but it's my Thunderdome entry so it doesn't get posted 'til it's a final. I start a drawing class Jan. 29 so a bunch of relatively quick pencil drawings will start showing up soon.

  15. #134
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    Good! And a huge plus is your incredible patience, the longest painting i've ever done was 10 hours and that was during an exam ;P
    The last has great texture and atmosphere, keep sketching; its more important than people think...
    peace!

    marco

  16. #135
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    Here's a preliminary sketch. I intend to make good on my threat in 3CHW to combine
    1. a black cyberpunk character threatens an orc in the flowers
    2. a shining farmer charms a magician on a water lily
    3. a robot in a cemetery of wrecks
    4. a fish in front of a metal structure
    5. a creature with hooks, a gryphon, a street in shanghai
    6. a sticky puppet vomits an apocalyptic warrior in a car park
    Attachment 77597
    The black cyberpunk character is a genetically engineered black leopard gryphon who is sort of a centaur and is defending her koi farm with her laser sighted 12 guage. Her back end is standing in water lilys (which are flowers). Across the pond approacheth a Herkimer War Head which is a hyper magnetic remote control troop delivery device. An orc warrior is leaping from its mouth. A couple of wrecked cars are sticking to its surface due to the magnetism. More orcs are approaching along the shore and one of them has a laser dot on his chest from the (shining) farmer's shotgun. The foreground is the magician's head. He is deeply moved by the courage of the shining farmer in the face of this adversity, although he is not ordinarily attracted to meta-replicants. In the background can be seen the worlds largest Ferris wheel, which is of course in Shanghai.

    I don't want to hear any more of this BS about how it is hard to combine three random elements in an image.

  17. #136
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    Title: Grand Canyon #2
    Size: 6 ft. x 8 ft.
    oil on canvas
    Looks like I should have gone for maximum instead of high. On the next one of these I'll show and describe the steps of preparing stretcher bars, stretching, sizing, and priming. This time was to demonstrate the process of painting detail over an underpainting.
    Last edited by arttorney; January 15th, 2007 at 02:20 PM.

  18. #137
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    I see what you mean with that big oilpainting. I myself started on a big one at school, I doubt it's ever gonna be finnished.

  19. #138
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  20. #139
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    Here's how far I've gotten on this. I know the magician's face is pretty lame at the moment.

  21. #140
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    I cleaned up that magician/shooting panther centaur thing. It's in 3CH.

    Here is my entry for the next 3CH-Random Topic of the week. It is an oil sketch on sized cardboard. 18" x 24"

  22. #141
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    Attachment 80816I don't want to show my studies in preparation for the Gods at War thunderdome just yet so I'm going to do the preparing a big canvas tutorial for the next few days. This canvas is 46" x 84" (116.84 cm x 213.36cm). I start with some red oak boards, inside corner braces (yellowish box), nails (greenish gray box), side angle braces (blackish gray thing), and a 54" x 3 yards (137.16 cm x 2.74 M) blanket canvas. Specifically I have an 8 ft. (243.84 cm) and two 7 ft. (213.36cm) boards that are about 1" x 3" (2.54cm x 7.62cm) in cross section. I also have boards of 1" x 2" cross section (2.54cm x 5.08cm) or thereabouts having a total length of at least 172 inches (4.37 M). This canvas I will prepare will be according to a quick and dirty method that gets the job done nicely. Traditionally you would go out and buy these expensive mitered interleaved stretcher bars that you can pound wedges into to tighten the canvas. The method I will show will give you a canvas of the size described above for about $75 US in 4 days (plus 2 days for each additional coat of primer). It can be cheaper if you use pine boards or something but see torsion description in the next post.
    Last edited by arttorney; January 21st, 2007 at 06:42 PM.

  23. #142
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    OK, so now I know what happens when you upload a photoshop document. Here is "torsion" as a jpeg. This is what will happen to your stretched canvas if it tightens too much. Acrylic primer does this big time. Acrylic primer is also more flexible than oil paint and so it is inadvisable to use it as a primer under oil paint on a flexible support such as canvas. I will be using the red oak and bracing it a bunch (and using egg oil emulsion so this doesn't happen. The dotted line is where the edge of the canvas should be as seen from edge on. It sucks when the canvas springs the stretcher bars like this.

  24. #143
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    I'm going to be nailing and screwing all over the place on these boards. This red oak is so bad ass that you have to drill pilot holes for the screws and nails using a drill bit that is a little bit narrower than the nails and screws. If you don't pre-drill, your nails will bend and be all fouled up. Your hand will get thrashed from trying to screw in the screws (and the head of the screw will get all bunged up before the screw is all the way in). After sawing the boards to the right length (see below) and before drilling pilot holes you should figure out where your braces will go and draw marks so you drill in the right place. I place the brace against the board as shown and draw in the holes producing dots like those you can also see on the board as though the brace is angling in the opposite direction.
    Attachment 80833
    Here is a diagram of how it will look and how it is assembled. "1" is 2 nails, "2" is a side angle brace, and "3" is an inside corner brace. The boards going the short direction are sawed to be 44" (111.8cm) long so the canvas will actually be 46" (116.8cm) wide when the long boards are butt joined to the outside of the short direction boards. Note that the bracing boards inside the perimeter are all inset. This is because you never want your brush to contact a brace when you are painting or it will leave an unsightly mark that you didn't intend. You can see the inset placement of a brace pretty well where I circled.
    Attachment 80834
    Last edited by arttorney; January 21st, 2007 at 06:59 PM.

  25. #144
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    (Could have sworn I resized this) Now you have to get domestic and sweep and mop
    where you will place your canvas. If you don't do this, your canvas will get dirty on
    the painting surface of it. Then lay out the canvas as shown below and put the frame
    on it with the bracing boards toward you (away from where the front of the canvas will be).
    Attachment 80836
    Use a stapler like the one shown above to staple the canvas to the very back of the stretcher
    bars. Don't staple on the wide sides. We are making a "gallery wrapped" canvas so you won't
    have to spend hundreds of dollars on a frame. Follow the order of stapling in the below diagram
    constantly stretching and pulling the canvas outward. Staple about every 6 inches or so (15cm).
    I just do this with my fingers but there are canvas pliers specifically made for this that will get
    the canvas tighter. You will only need to do this once before you figure out what will make it
    come out wonky and what will make it good. Stretching canvas is a little bit like sex in that
    respect, but there's not really a happy ending just yet. We will hospital wrap the ends like
    wrapping a Christmas present so it looks all tidy (see image in tomorrow's post). Cut off the
    extra canvas so it is not in the way and doesn't show if the painting is hung against the wall.
    Attachment 80837

    At this point you will see wrinkles on the front of the canvas because of where it was folded
    (unless you used rolled canvas instead of blanket canvas). Use the misting spray bottle of
    warm water shown above near the stapler to spray down the front of the canvas and leave
    it alone to dry. This will help remove the wrinkles. Don't worry. After we size and prime they
    will all be gone.
    Last edited by arttorney; January 23rd, 2007 at 07:17 PM.

  26. #145
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    I hope the edit I did to the text in the last post will help minimize side scrolling.

    I suddenly have a shitload of day job emergencies to do. I may update irregularly for two or three weeks. Sorry. I hate to work hard at things other than art, but I do kind of need the money. It's time to buy a new car. Moreover, if I blow off the work, the attorneys I have been working for on these tasks will cease to send me such work in the future and I will then have to waste more time finding work for myself. Bummer.

    This first pic is of how the hospital corner should look. It also shows how the staples are not on the sides, they are on the back. Your stapler probably didn't drive the staples all the way in. I generally go around with a hammer and pound the staples in that last two or three millimeters.
    Attachment 82045
    The second image is how the front looks the morning after I spray misted it but before applying the size. Size is a kind of glue that is generally derived from animal skins. You buy it at the art store as a tub or little bag of light yellow ochre looking granules. Before I size I generally mask the front of the canvas around the edges and paint the sides of it with white acrylic primer so it looks all neat and pretty for the galleries. After this has dried, I remove that masking tape and I mask the areas I put the acrylic primer on (so size juice and oil paint don't get on the sides of the canvas later).
    Attachment 82047
    Prepare size by putting two tablespoons of the granules in a pint of water. I usually do this in a small coffee can. If you are not using an official tablespoon, but are using one made for eating, then I am talking about heaping tablespoons of size granules. Leave the size in the water to soak a couple of hours. Put the plastic temporary lid on the coffee can so dust or bugs don't go in there. After the soaking period, sit the coffee can into a pan of water and begin heating it on the stove. You want it to get pretty warm, but never to boil! The size will get dissolved. Set the coffee can aside for another couple of hours to cool. It should gel and the gel should break in an irregular manner when you poke your finger on the top. If it breaks cleanly the size is too strong. Add water and reheat as above. If the size did not gel then it is too weak. Add size granules, soak a couple hours and reheat as above. When the size is right, heat it to a liquid lukewarm state and brush it on the canvas in one direction only. That's why the arrows are on the image. Don't go back and forth. Don't mix back and forth strokes with up and down. Leave this to dry overnight and tomorrow morning you will probably find a canvas that is dry and already getting tight enough that you can make bass drum noises with it. The wrinkles are probably gone by now.
    If you have extra size, put it in the refrigerator with the lid on. You'll need it later and it'll keep up to a week.
    I use soap and water to clean the size out of the brush.
    Last edited by arttorney; January 27th, 2007 at 03:51 PM.

  27. #146
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    This first pic is how the masking looks for the step of painting the white acrylic primer on the sides.
    Attachment 83093

    This second pic is how the double boiler setup looks that you use to heat the size. You would apply the size with something like a hog bristle varnishing brush from the home improvement store. I've been working at stuff and grappling with some health issues but I hope to move on to priming tomorrow or Saturday. The size should be only lukewarm, or it might lead to overtightening.
    Attachment 83094

  28. #147
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    This post is about the priming and is the last thing before painting. I'll be back to posting drawings before you know it.

    I use egg oil emulsion primer on these big canvases, and usually on panels too. The overtightening tendencies of the acrylic primer, the fact that it is more flexible than oil, and the fact that it is more expensive make it not so attractive for me in this application. The book formula is to crack an egg into a jar and then use the shell to measure in an equal volume of refined linseed oil and two volumes of cold water. Put the lid on the jar and shake vigorously to form an emulsion. Then you are supposed to grind a little of the emulsion with titanium white pigment until it forms a stiff paste and use the remaining emulsion to thin it out to the consistency of heavy cream. I omit the titanium white for two reasons. First, you need a respirator to work with this stuff. (What a pain in the ass.) Second, I got some issues with values anyway and one way to deal with that is to avoid blinding yourself out with a bright white canvas. Once you have done this titanium white step you are supposed to thin the mixture out to a milky consistency with lukewarm size. I hope you didn't throw your extra size from the last step because you can keep it in the refrigerator for up to a week and you need it for egg oil emulsion. The ingredients:
    Attachment 83942
    Now, what I do is this. I break the egg into the empty jar (shown here on its side). I put in the double volume of water using the egg shell. For the one volume of linseed oil I use the sludgiest jar of linseed oil from the jars of it I use to clean my brushes. (The standing up jar) That stirring stick is to stir up the sludge. That sludge is suspended pigment (no respirator required). I make the emulsion by shaking the closed jar. I dump in about half again to three quarters again of the volume worth of lukewarm size until it's about a milky consistency. The coffee can contains our old friend, the size. I stir it up good or close it and shake it. I now have primer. About half of one of these salsa jars is enough to do a canvas of the dimensions I am currently making.
    Attachment 83944
    As you can see, the primer makes the canvas come out a little bit more of a neutral gray than the brilliant white of the usual commercial canvas. You can either do it this way, or the titanium white way, or just use refined linseed oil with no sludge or titanium white (to make an off white canvas). It's your call. This canvas is now smooth on the surface and definitely tight enough to make low drum noises. After drying two days, it will be in precisely the same ready condition as the canvas I used to make the Grand Canyon oil in the background. After a couple of weeks drying, I cannot see any sinking cracking or abnormalities in the Grand Canyon painting. I hope you can get as good of results as I do in getting your canvas to stretch out just right and feel great when you are painting on it.

    I clean the primer out of the brush as I would clean out oil paint.

    WARNING: I was out there tapping the newly primed canvas after it dried to listen to the drum noises (in my simple mindedness) when I saw that it was causing the drying Grand Canyon painting to vibrate harmoniously. That's probably not a good thing. Don't hang around playing drums on stretched canvases in the same room with your big drying oil paintings unless you are prepared to assume the risk of such harmonious vibrations disrupting the integrity of your drying paint.
    Last edited by arttorney; January 30th, 2007 at 11:27 AM.

  29. #148
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    Here's some hockey gestural studies from life.

  30. #149
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    The inaugaral entry in my ongoing draw from life assignment sketchbook for school.

  31. #150
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    In class tonight I got to draw this really cute mom who's teenage daughter is the one taking the class. Since mom doesn't draw, I got to draw her again when it was time to switch. The bad news is that I was not supposed to look at the page much, so the drawings look lame. The good news is that I was supposed to look at her face, which I was more than happy to do.

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