Inking Pens: Felt-tip, Ballpoint, or Fountain?
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    Inking Pens: Felt-tip, Ballpoint, or Fountain?

    I'm interested in intricate pen rendering, the sort that looks kind of like old English woodcuts.

    Does anyone use fountain pens anymore? I think most illustrators did up to the 1930s (maybe they remained popular for decades after that, I dunno.) What are the pros and cons of fountain pens?

    What are the advantages/disadvantages of something like Micron or Sakura pens?
    Are there any ballpoint pens worth using? What other kinds are there?

    Feel free to answer inking pen questions that I haven't asked, and elaborate liberally on the ones I have asked, since I don't know what I don't know.

    EDIT: Ackwow! I just found that this: http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...t=fountain+pen was just Papermate ballpoints!

    Last edited by LukeTores; June 19th, 2006 at 11:36 PM.
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    i used to have a fountain pen which i loved very much. but i would fill it up with black india ink instead of the stuff they provided. india ink being permanent and the other not. but alas the india ink would clog the fountain pen. i'd bang it against my sketch book to get the ink flowing. sometimes i'd get some happy accidents with the splater. but one time i was banging it on a piece of paper which was on some mica and i totally busted the pen. but i think it's time to invest in another one.

    personally i hate the felt tips and ball point becasie yiu can't get any substantial line variation. but i'll draw with anything on hand if i'm in dire need.

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    Elwell is offline Sticks Like Grim Death Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
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    Actually, fountain pens were rarely used for drawing, even in the days before ballpoints and felt tips when they were the standard writing pen. Most ink illustration was (and a lot still is) done with dip pens and brushes. Hunt 102 crowquills are the standard inking nib.


    Tristan Elwell
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    I use Bic Velocity pen for all my drawings and renderings... They dont blotch up and are fairly smooth when writing.. I've used tons of other ball points and found that one to be the best.. Hi-tech makes a good ball point that I believe Dutton uses...

    Mainloop- man i must be dyslexic.. cuz i thought you asked how many people are on lsd

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    http://www.shoplet.com/office/db/ZEB44110.html
    This pen is amazing, I found it lying around and goes sooo smooth.

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    I had a drawing professor that collected antique fountain pens. He would often draw with them... and got amazing results! Of course, he was an amazing draftsman in the first place. The thing is, Lloyd's antique fountain pens had flexible nibs like a dip-quill, so he would get incredible line variation. I don't know if they make 'em like that any more. All the modern fountain pens I've ever seen have rigid tips for uniform line width.

    Remember that fountain pen ink is not India ink. Regular India ink is made with a particulate suspension (lamp black actually) and is just about as fade, water, and light resistant as you can get. Unfortunately the particles tend to clog fountain pens (and just forget about tech pens). So they came up with "Fount" ink which is made from liquid dyes. It tends not to be as truly black as India ink.

    Personally I favor a kolinsky sable brush and a hunt #108 "flexible" quill.

    And last thing, if you really are interested in pen and ink, you NEED to find a copy of Joseph A Smith's creatively-titled "Pen & Ink Book: Materials and Techniques for Today's Artist"!

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    Brushes are great if you can master those. Felt tips probably give you the least amount of hassle, but you can get more fine lines and other effects from fountain. Ball points suck.

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    What's the difference between fountain and dip pens? I thought they were the same.
    EDIT: Wikipedia says fountain pens have a reservoir of ink in the handle, so can only use certain inks w/o clogging. Dip pens are dipped into a bottle of ink (or ink is put on with an eyedropper), so they can use many different kinds of ink. The two look similar, and the nibs are almost identical.

    What sort of pens let you vary line thickness with pressure?

    Anyone know any good artists or compilation books of really cool pen-and-ink art?

    Last edited by LukeTores; June 20th, 2006 at 03:12 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by LukeTores
    What sort of pens let you vary line thickness with pressure?
    any sort of brush pen would do the trick... Stadtler makes one... it doesnt last long so i would suggest buying them by the box... thats what i usually do with all my pen purchases

    Mainloop- man i must be dyslexic.. cuz i thought you asked how many people are on lsd

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    Quote Originally Posted by LukeTores
    Anyone know any good artists or compilation books of really cool pen-and-ink art?
    Google:
    Joseph Clement Coll
    Franklin Booth
    Charles Dana Gibson
    Virgil Finlay


    Tristan Elwell
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    "What sort of pens let you vary line thickness with pressure?"

    Dip-pen...

    A dip pen and fountain pen are stucturally similar but the dip pen is much simpler. A fountain pen carries it's own resovoir of ink in the handle. In the old days you'd fill it with an eyedropper or some-such... nowadays they generally come with pre-filled cartridges. Fountain pens are more complex as the ink flows through channels to feed into the nib. They are more prone to clog and obviously they are way more expensive. Because they're mostly made for writing, they also have a more rigid point, for line uniformity. Dip pen is super old-school but gives the best line variation short of a brush.

    If you find a dip nib you like, buy a whole bunch of them.

    "Change is a virtue my friend... if you want to escape, all you have to do is make up your mind."
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    Check out Bernie Wrightson's "Frankenstein"!

    "Change is a virtue my friend... if you want to escape, all you have to do is make up your mind."
    John Cale / Bob Neuwirth


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    A good booktip with some nice illustrations from the 30´s is Guptill´s "Rendering in pen and ink".

    The dip pen is still my favourite though I use from time to time a felttip one, when I´m outside. Not sure what it´s called, it´s a Pentel ...

    Fipse

    <Insert witty remark here>
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    pilot hi-tec's are great sketchers- you can get them from www.jetpens.com

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    regular bic ballpoint pen.

    SSG27, Suckas!
    "we blastin' off right now!"

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