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    SF/F Book Cover Portfolio

    Alright guys, as promised, here is a sister thread to
    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=66146

    I am talking about showing your portfolio to commercial, science fiction & fantasy book publishing and magazine companies. While I’m sure there are some things in common, I would bet there are many differences in preparing a portfolio for comics or concept work in film and gaming.

    This is, of course, just my opinion. Smart people gather information from many sources and then make their own decisions. I'm sure there are things I forgot to mention here, but that is what the discussion is for.

    And remember, when an art director is speaking to you professionally, they are thinking about the concerns of their jobs. Art directors see TONS of work that they adore but haven’t found a way to utilize. Being hired is not the same as doing great work. We always strive for as much overlap as possible but, in the end, I need to get all my covers past all the fickle opinions of a Sales and Marketing department, booksellers, and the readership.

    I’ve included some samples. I kept them very small since this post was getting way too long to being with. All these images are easily found elsewhere. They are all positive examples...although showing negative examples might have been more fun.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    SF/F BOOK COVER PORTFOLIO DOS AND DON’TS

    SHOW THE CLIENT WHAT THEY WANT TO SEE
    Know who you are showing your work to. Don't show your still-lifes and say, "But what I REALLY want to do is fantasy book covers." If that's what you really want to do, then sit down and create a new portfolio. And don't offer to do a job on spec to prove that you can switch gears.
    Create different portfolios for different clients. The presentation you show a card gaming company may be subtlety different than the presentation you show a book publisher.

    CONSISTENCY
    The “Weakest Link” principle reigns supreme. Especially when looking at portfolios from young artists just out of school a couple of years. I need to know that you are in complete command of your craft. If you have seven paintings that you really like and three that you’re not fond of, sit down and paint three more pictures. An AD will always fear that they could get you on a bad day. ADs don’t want to take a chance on new talent, they want to feel comfortable and excited about working with new talent.

    KNOW WHO YOUR COMPETITION IS
    Remember that the day you graduate, artists like Donato Giancola, Todd Lockwood, Jon Foster are your competition. You need to give me a reason to hire you instead of those guys. I don’t say this to make it seem hopeless but, rather, to make younger artists realize that they really NEED to work hard to get their foot in the door. And they need to work smartly. Look at your work critically and constantly work to improve.

    FIGURES
    Figure drawing, figure drawing, figure drawing! The most important thing for a book publisher is figure drawing. You may get away with faking the rest (for a little while) but you need to have 100% solid figure drawing that does not look stiff and cartoonish. (“Poser” people tend to look weightless and artificial. Learn how to draw the figure.)
    There are only a few artists who are willing to include more than one or two figures in a painting. If you can handle a crowd scene, it can go a long way to separating you from your competition.

    SF/F Book Cover Portfolio SF/F Book Cover Portfolio SF/F Book Cover Portfolio
    Examples:
    I like how both Jon Foster and Donato Giancola veer away from the typical six-foot tall point of view here. Scott M. Fischer has a more subtle, but still very effective angle on his. All have effectively painted real individuals, not just cookie-cutter model types.


    BODIES IN MOTION
    This is tough. Action often looks stiff or fake. The trick is getting good reference so that the pose is accurate and then deviating from it to give it some life. There are only a couple of people that I trust with real action...but when it works, it’s kick ass.
    SF/F Book Cover Portfolio
    Example:
    In Gregory Manchess’ painting we sense the heft of Conan’s body while feeling the split second of weightlessness between throwing his arm back and having it come crashing down on us.

    WOMEN
    Yes, we constantly show sexy, big-breasted babes on our covers. BUT, there is a fine line between sexy and freakish. If you are using Hustler for your reference, you're on the wrong side of that line. Along with sexy, they usually need to look like they can kick-ass. Slave girls don't impress art directors. Book publishing does not use pin-up. And breasts are NOT perfectly spherical.

    SF/F Book Cover Portfolio
    Example:
    Louis Royo.This figure is sexy, strong, and in command of the situation without being obviously posed strictly for titillation. Royo explores all kinds of dark and erotic themes in his personal work but, for his book covers he is able to pull back a bit for the more conservative book publishing market.

    FASHION
    This applies more to artists that have been in the industry a decade or two but let this be a cautionary tale for young artists: It’s not a great idea to always use your girlfriend/wife in every painting. As people get older their sense of what is fashionable sometimes ends shortly after college. It’s slightly painful when I see a figure in the painting whose clothing and/or hair is clearly from the 80s. (Fantasy paintings are amuck in mullets!) Unless it’s a historical piece, costuming should attempt to be as timeless looking as possible. Looking “dated” is the kiss of death for an illustrator. (Men’s fashion doesn’t seem to be as identifiable so I don’t often see this problem in male figures.)

    BACKGROUNDS
    Too much detail in the background flattens the image out. Artists working in PhotoShop love to show every brick of the castle that is resting on the mountain across the valley. Not good.

    SF/F Book Cover Portfolio SF/F Book Cover Portfolio
    Examples:
    Stephan Martiniere is a master at implying detail with abstract shapes. It keeps the image alive.
    We don't need to see every leaf in Greg Manchess's painting to know that there is a jungle back there.

    CREATURES
    Book publishing (outside of gaming tie-ins) does not show many monsters. I know that games use tons of them and they look great, but a portfolio full of monsters isn't a help to me.
    Showing an example or two of some classic mythic creatures is good - dragons, unicorns, trolls - but I don't need to see tons of it and they should not be of the twelve arm, five eyeball, gooey variety. Good anatomy on animals and creatures is critical. The people are still more important, but if you can also sell me on horses and dragons, you’re golden.

    SF/F Book Cover Portfolio SF/F Book Cover Portfolio
    Examples:
    Tristan Elwell’s horse head is spot on. If it had fallen flat it would have distracted from the exquisite face he painted.
    The light on Dan Dos Santo’s dragon is great but, as in the example above, the creature is in service to the human figure.

    BLOOD N’ GUTS
    Not so interesting. Even horror books stay away from gore. Grit is fine, a little bit of subtle blood and grime is okay, but no Marketing Department will let an evisceration pass.

    SF/F Book Cover Portfolio
    Example:
    This detail from Donato Giancola’s painting is so effecting because he is showing the tragedy of war in how the characters are interacting, not because he is showing rivers of blood.

    REFERENCE
    I don’t care if you have to stand on your head to make a good picture. Most likely, you’ll need reference. Use it. Don’t be a slave to it.

    START WITH YOUR BEST PIECE
    There’s never a second chance to make a first impression. Make people WANT to turn the page.

    NEVER APOLOGIZE
    If you are showing off a portfolio you are asking a busy person to take their time to look at your best work in its best presentation. Never explain why the image didn't come out as well as you hoped or how bad the print looks. It will either make me nervous that you'll run into the same problems on my job or make me wonder why you are having me look at a portfolio that even you feel is not ready.
    It's surprising but people do this all the time. The best artists can point out mistakes in their paintings...but they don't. Be professional and stand by your work.

    IMPRESS, DON’T EMBARRASS
    I’ve had people get on their knees and beg for a chance. This kind of behavior embarrasses the art director and should embarrass the artist. Don’t chase an art director at inappropriate moments, such as an awards ceremony, while at dinner, etc.

    BE POLITE
    If you are asking for constructive criticism, than be prepared to listen. You can ignore all of it, but don’t keep telling the AD why you didn’t do it that way in the first place. You’ve asked their opinion and they are giving it. You can decide whether it’s rubbish or not latter.
    Not all situations warrant a “thank you” note, but, if you are lucky enough to get special attention from someone, or someone took extra time out for you, take a moment to say thanks. It’s the polite thing to do and it will remind them of you and your work.

    COVER LETTERS / RESUMES
    These often do more harm than good. Anything that starts with "How art thou!" goes straight into the garbage. Anything that is trying too hard to sell themselves or that states that they "just happen" to have some free time coming up is a bad sign. If you are not going for a full time job, there is no need for these. It's all about the portfolio.

    MAIL-INS
    * If you want them back, include a SASE.
    * Have your name and contact on EACH piece. It's easy for samples to get separated.
    * Postcards are fine. If something is intriguing I'll go look up a website.
    * A collection of a few 8x10s are fine.
    * CDs are not looked at. If I already know you, I'll look at them. Otherwise, it takes too long to load them up. Also, work looks very different lit in RGB than it does printed in CMYK. I won’t hire someone souly by what I can see on my screen.
    * Follow-ups about 3 times a year are good.
    * Don't get too clever with the envelopes/packages. Don't send toys, candy, etc. (I hate it when they send candy...I SO much want to eat it but it's candy from STRANGERS!) Pros don't get cute with their presentations. It should look clean and let the work shine.
    * If you are not a designer, keep all the type simple. Most art directors are designers. It won’t stop me from looking at the artwork but you don't want my first thought to be, "Uhg! Chrome, embossed, script lettering!"

    KEEP WEBSITES UPDATED
    Please. Especialy for anyone in their first decade or two of business. Your abilities are (hopefully) growing in leaps and bounds. It’s frustrating to know that someone is doing good work without being unable to show it to an editor...or being unable to remid myself of all that great work I saw from them at a convention last week.

    GETTING THE SECOND JOB
    Once you do get a job, do it well and do it on time. That is your best chance to getting a second job from the same client. Repeat, DO IT ON TIME.

    -----------------------------

    A lot of what was written here is common sense but many people, especially when nervous, can fall into what seem like obvious traps. The best advice is to act like a pro until you become one. Be confident without being cocky, never stop working while waiting for the phone to ring, get your work out into as many venues as possible, and find places to network and meet the people you are hoping to get hired by.

    ........Did I mention that figure drawing is important?

    Last edited by Irene Gallo; April 24th, 2006 at 05:27 PM.
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  4. #2
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    Thank you so much, very kind of you to give such a generous information, I'm very grateful.

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    Well written. This is a much better perspective than the other link because it shows both the dos and don'ts.

    Interesting thing about gore, too. Something I never thought of, but now that I picture it, I've never seen a gorey book cover.


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    Awesome article!!!

    I agree. I learned much more reading this than the other article, and its very very very very very very helpful!

    Thank you so much!


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    Thank you very much Irene!! this was helpfull in many ways.
    Wow! that was a lot of writting you did, haha!
    thanks again,
    -T

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    *bookmark*

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    Great info, and a few things that I'd never even thought about (the "most art directors are designers..." for example). Thanks Irene!

    "Every little step considered one at a time is not terribly daunting" - Ethan Coen

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    Thanks Irene.

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    "See, the sad thing about a guy like you is in 50 years you're gonna staht doin some thinkin on your own and you're gonna come up with the fact that there are two certaintees in life. One, don't do that. And Two, you dropped a hundred and fifty grand on a fuckin education you coulda got for a dollah fifty in late chahges at the public library."
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    Thanks Irene, thats some awesome advise right there! This is why I love CA.org

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    Really useful information, there - thanks, Irene!

    Mid.

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    Thank you for taking the time to write this all out, I will keep this for later

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    This should be sent to the Employment Discussion section, and stickied so everyone can always acess it easily. Oh yeah, very helpful of you to take the time to write all this up Irene!

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    big thanks from me here... very helpful advise


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    wonderful irene, really really useful post

    hehehe, embossed chrome script lettering, hehehehe

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    Awsome stuff indeed, thank you. I was wondering what art directors think of digital work for their book covers, would they choose a traditional painter over the other?? And does it effect pay rates?

    Last edited by Kresh; April 24th, 2006 at 10:19 AM.
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    i was looking forward to reading this.
    great advice in here. thanks so much Irene!
    it's great to have someone like you willing to help out new talent.
    this among other things is why CA rocks!

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    Thanks Irene!! I can't express how much I appreciate you taking the time to type all this out. You're the bestest!

    Now to go work on that portfolio....

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    wow, you were up late!

    this is gold.

    i'd be curious to know how many artists YOU FIND, versus, how many FIND YOU.
    do annuals play a large role in discovery, or just reinforcement?
    do you actively seek out new talent?

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    CA is a treasure chest and we just struck it rich! Thanks Irene!

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    Great read Irene!
    This must be stickied or put somewhere....I know I would have loved this about a year ago. Man...reading it I felt shame because I am guilty of a lot of the pitfalls, but I did some things right too.

    Thanks for taking the time to do this...it will really help those already pursuing careers in this field, and it will be extremely beneficial for art students also looking to work in this genre.

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    Wow, thanks Irene. It was very kind of you to write this up for everyone! Very straight forward and makes a lot of sense. I am sure many of us will find this quite useful. It was good to be reminded of how the focus really needs to be on people.

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    Great read Irene... and to think I had this big box of intriguing candy ready to come your way.

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    *bookmarked aswell*
    great info!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Irene Gallo
    I like how both Jon Foster and Donato Giancola veer away from the typical six-foot tall point of view here.
    this has to be one of the best nuggets of information Irene ever voluntered that has been etched into my head. we were drinking ourselves silly at the Society of Illustrators when Irene mentioned this and luckilly i was still somewhat sober to remeber this.
    If you pick up most book covers you see this "figure in the foreground" composition. its safe and gets pretty boring. pick up work by Jon Foster, Donato and James Jean (among others) and you see them push the envelope.



    Quote Originally Posted by Irene Gallo
    IMPRESS, DON’T EMBARRASS
    I’ve had people get on their knees and beg for a chance. This kind of behavior embarrasses the art director and should embarrass the artist. Don’t chase an art director at inappropriate moments, such as an awards ceremony, while at dinner, etc.
    AD's are people too. would you want some sweaty fanboy ask you to draw them catwoman in tights while you're out to dinner with a girl. or would you really want to talk about flipping burgers, or whatever it is you do to pay the bills, on the weekend?




    oh and by the way, Irene, 1:00AM??? you must really like us
    and too bad that you're such a kind person to spare all the suckas the embarrassment. Would have been nice to see the "Shit Not to Do" examples.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kresh
    I was wondering what art directors think of digital work for their book covers, would they choose a traditional painter over the other?? And does it effect pay rates?
    I don't think it really matters. As long as you are proficient in your tools, that's all that matters. Some art directors feel that digital is better because it's more easily editable...but I find with real pros it doesn't matter. I love working with Martiniere, Foster, Elwell, Dos Santos, Fischer, Donato....it doesn't matter that some of these guys are traditional, others are digital, and others float between the two. They are all great painters.

    It shouldn't effect the pay scale. Complexity of the image would, artist's reputation might, or asking for a big rush, but not the medium. I wouldn't pay more or less for a watercolor versus an oil painting so it shouldn't matter that it is digital.

    There is a secondary market of selling originals. If you are digital, you are cutting yourself off from that, but that IS secondary issue. Not everyone cares or finds that feasible. Here is a young forum that is centered around collectors. It's only a few months old, but I've learned a lot from it already: http://www.munchkinpress.com/phpBB2/index.php

    --------

    By the way, I am only speaking of my experience. Everyone should feel free to chime in if they have heard or experienced contrary advice. I don't get nearly the opportunities to hang out with other art directors the way I should.

    ---------

    Dan - interesting questions. Let me get some work done and I'll get back to that.

    Cody - YOU can send candy anytime you'd like.

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    Don't mind my post here. Just trying to subscribe to this thread because my subscribe button up top isn't working.


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    thanks a lot, awesome read!

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    This is awesome, thank you for the write-up. I'm also curious about what Dan asked.

    /fd
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    Thanks for typing this up Irine, *bookmarks*.. I don't mean to be a pain though but could you give the links to the larger images you used as reference? I would really like to take a closer look at them.

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    Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by Irene Gallo
    It’s slightly painful when I see a figure in the painting whose clothing and/or hair is clearly from the 80s. (Fantasy paintings are amuck in mullets!)
    HA!!!! The pain

    Thanks for the article, it really cuts down on a lot of second guessing and wasted time for everybody. Perhaps this could go on the Tor website for art submissions? (Just a thought) ... I especially like on the Tor FAQ "Art: You need to know two things: our Art Director is Irene Gallo, and she doesn't want you to phone her." ... HA!!!!!

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