tank concept
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Thread: tank concept

  1. #1
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    tank concept

    i drew this first and rendered it in painter. im still getting use to painter and i welcome and suggestion on better tools to use or help on the actual render. i used the fx brush, chalk, pen, and airbrush.



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    thank you that was extremely unhelpfull

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    Last edited by tongue-fu; April 27th, 2006 at 01:13 AM.
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    Something feels a little off with the treads, can't quite place it. Maybe bump up the size of the drive wheels just a tiny little bit but that's my pedantic nature showing through.

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    I haven't used painter before so Im not familiar with the tools you've used, but first off there are quite a few errors from an immediate glance;

    o- The tracks. They appear very loose, and incorrectly fitting to the drive wheels, they need to be taut and strong, otherwise the wheels wont contact the tracks and the vehicle wont go forward, so I suggest you could fix that up by redrawing the tank tracks to fit around the wheels, much like this picture.

    o- The machine gun seems strange, as does the belt-feed. Its very flat and shows the projectiles to be some sortof pellet (Im assuming you preferred Bullets), also the front support on the muzzle of the machine gun will be broken/bent/shattered when the main gun fires from the recoil id' imagine, I suggest redrawing the tank's maingun/MG, as the MG would be fixed to the maingun, its pitch/yaw would be very limited. Perhaps put the machine gun on a pintle mount, or try to come up with a different design of how to go about placing the machine gun on the tank.

    o- Make sure to clean up your edges a bit, 'cause theres alot of areas where any color isnt where it should be.

    o- Refrain from using white to highlight areas and black to darken other areas, It tends to make the image look flat.

    You may have heard this before from other people posting or somewhere else. So its probably becoming a drag but its important, draw from life to get a handle on form/line/shape/texture/etc. Metal forms for example, spoons, knives, forks, torches, watches, anything that resembles said form. Studying from life will help you a great deal so you can apply it throughout your drawings, rather than a very flat 2 dimensional drawing, you can (draw) turn the tank you have there so that it appears 3 dimensional and you'll be able to do so given the practice of drawing from life. Its alright to experiment with digital/other mediums aswell, but try to keep off it for the moment and work on your drawing skills when you can before jumping into the rendering stage.

    My brains turned to mush by this time of night, but I hope this helps and practice practice practice on your drawing first!

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    Google "tanks" and study them. Then draw a bunch of them.

    In Painter first try using standard brushes like oil and such. Avoid special brushes like any of the FX types for now. Learn to get the look you want by putting the pixils in place by hand instead of a special brush doing it for you.

    Treads look like a crude after thought. Don't just imagin the overall look of your design but think about the details. Practice your perspective. Draw shapes and start a sketchbook.

    Keep at it and draw, draw, draw.

    Peace, Love and Harmony... I could never get them all into bed at the same time!
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    Yo'th. Besides what could be said about the rendering, I think it needs to be pointed out that the design needs to solidified a little more before you start rendering. It's kind of interesting but methinks you could do to look at more tank refs, maybe think about functionality...where's the crew go in this thing?

    Don't get discouraged. The most important part of improvement is doing, so keep practicin', there. Oh, and, if you really don't want anyone commenting on the design, then next time it would be more proper not to label it as a 'concept', but instead a tank sketch or painting since...concepts are pretty much about the design of the concept more than its presentation.

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    like l scott said get as many tank references as you can and study them
    it will only help

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    heres the inittial sketch, so you can see more clearly what i started with. thanks for all the helpfull comments. the thing im trying to get better at is rendering. i have alot of trouble with it. any help in that area would be appreciated.



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    Still need to look at reference. The larger wheels are flush with the treads, and a tank that's 75% turret doesn't seem very practical. Exaggeration and stylization are great, but believability in context is a big deal. It looks like it's going to tip over.

    And don't be afraid to work big. You're confining yourself to a tiny, tiny space for drawing something so massive. There's no way to get detail into it at that scale

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    i took the advice for using oils brush. i created this pretty quick and instead of making a new post i thought id post it here. let me know if im on the right track.. also mine i changed a little to my liking.

    reference:


    my painting:


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    Quote Originally Posted by njo
    the thing im trying to get better at is rendering. i have alot of trouble with it. any help in that area would be appreciated.
    You're putting the cart before the horse here. Even the best colors and most bad-ass rendering will still look terrible if you're rendering over a poor drawing. Some painters don't sketch in pencil before they paint (partly because they sketch constantly in their sketchbooks when they're not painting) but mostly because they have a solid understanding of forms, volume, edges, contour, values...

    ...all of which your tank study was lacking. As for the mountains, your color selection isn't as bad, but the form of your mountains is off. The reference pic shows a bowl-like scoop of a valley on the right side, very concave. Your paint study shows bumpy, almost tube-like formations and doesn't read as naturally.

    I know you'd like to skip to the fun parts of painting, which is the rendering. But you need to start where we all started and begin to train your eye to explore forms, simplify and better interpret what you're looking at.

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    oh dude, the second dsrawing is sooo much better. However i really suggest you fin9ish it dont leave it on a white bg. One thing to consider when you use a ref like that, is its all about contrast the further something is in the distance the less contrast it has, you have no temperature changel no real hue change not much value change either. Thats why its good to put in a for middle and background.

    But yeah. Pick something a little less abstract to paint, infact find something cool that you familiar with and draw it from life, you can use your tablet if you really want to but before you do anything else really you need to start really looking. Once you learn to see something you can really start to draw it. Dont draw from another image draw something your familiar with, i know it can seem tedious and boring but you would be amazed how much you can learn, you dont need to do an apple on a cloth (allthough that is a good exercise) try to find some bones, or like crab shells make for awesome drawings. But you really need to sit down and crunch through the fundamentals its really really important.

    Acctually go to the finnaly finished forum, look at some artists you admire and look how they did it, study really really closely, and i guess keep posting here.

    the comments about refs are right build a librabry of them, real and mental all the things you can think of peoples facial expressions the way a nose looks like from the bottom the circut board on your new graphics card the weird nautilus at the aquarium the industrial design of your camera, next time you look at something interesting really look at what it is the way the light hits it the very little bit of bounce light that has a slight colour or whatever it may be, observe, observe, draw observe, and you will be able to apply it to all of your work.

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  14. #14
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    thank you for all the help. i guess i do some drawings then and take it from there

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    Last edited by tongue-fu; April 27th, 2006 at 01:13 AM.
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