Art: Planing or searching lines?

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  1. #1
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    Planing or searching lines?

    Hi!
    I always put my lines on paper just to erase them until I find an acceptable form. Is this a bad habbit? Could it be better to think about each line clearly before placing it? Please give me your opinions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pogopuschel
    Is this a bad habbit?
    God, I hope not.


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    I do that too!

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    i guess most people do. it's called sketching

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pogopuschel
    Hi!
    I always put my lines on paper just to erase them until I find an acceptable form. Is this a bad habbit? Could it be better to think about each line clearly before placing it? Please give me your opinions.
    I would say these two things are not mutually exclusive. Give alot of thought to the line before you put it down (especially if this line is to serve a specific purpose) but don't be married to it once it is down. Refine things until you get what you want. I like to tell my students there is no one right way to do things, in fact I get the best results from combining seamingly divergent approaches, thought processes, techniques etc. because this gets me to look at things from different perspectives

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    I think it's the universal way to draw

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    Quote Originally Posted by E.M.GIST
    I would say these two things are not mutually exclusive. Give alot of thought to the line before you put it down (especially if this line is to serve a specific purpose) but don't be married to it once it is down. Refine things until you get what you want. I like to tell my students there is no one right way to do things, in fact I get the best results from combining seamingly divergent approaches, thought processes, techniques etc. because this gets me to look at things from different perspectives
    Whoa! Great reply!
    I've been thinking alot about this lately but couldn't come up with a answer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by E.M.GIST
    I would say these two things are not mutually exclusive. Give alot of thought to the line before you put it down (especially if this line is to serve a specific purpose) but don't be married to it once it is down. Refine things until you get what you want. I like to tell my students there is no one right way to do things, in fact I get the best results from combining seamingly divergent approaches, thought processes, techniques etc. because this gets me to look at things from different perspectives
    This makes sense to me. Thank you for your insights everyone! I just had this thought while watching those open canvas wpe's. My impression was that I put my lines to fast on paper. Maybe refining will be less needed when my skills improve.

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    i know it's the obvious, but u might have overlooked the fact that u can sketch your lines lighter then darken the values later

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    which leads me to mention what some artist use : a clue pencil

    peeps like me who love to draw with animation pencils called COL-ERASE, usually Indigo-Blue, sometimes green or red variants, appreciate it for the very fact that you can lightly look for your shape. It allows you to loosen up your gesture and consequently have a fluid pose. All the while not oversaturating your paper with lead but a very subtle line that you can bump by pushing harder on the pen. Sometimes using a lead pencil on top of everything defines the lines even more. Basically it's a saving grace if you like to experiment with your shapes/lines/form. I beleive some people work differently tho, like Marko or Wes.

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    I've been wondering the same thing for some time and I still am I guess. They both have their particular qualities, and I think it depends on what kind of work you are doing.
    I think searching for lines can be less rigid and allows for more exploration than planing each line, which can make things more rigid but also look more clean.
    You can start making a rough sketch gently. Then you can erase those lines and make more defined cleaned lines on top, or you can trace the rough sketch and make clean lines on a new page. You can use a projector, or if you are using a painting program that has layers you can make the clean lines on a new layer.
    If you are painting and are not worried about the clean lines showing up in the final painting, you can start painting right on the rough sketch and resolve certain things later in the painting. I think a lot of people think this is not the best way to do it, but then again I've seen a lot of people do it and achive wonderful results.

    EDIT: you can also use different materials for different things, like egerie mentioned using a col-erase pencil for sketching and a lead pencil or pen for the cleaner lines. You can also use markers for sketching and pens for cleaner lines, Feng Zhu has works in this approach.

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    If you start with a really really light touch on your paper, letting you feel the lines of the body, you can then go ahead after all the search lines have been laid and you are confident in where everything should go and darken the right ones up, and start shading.
    I can't for the life of me remember an artist who in each of his drawing, let all of his search lines stay, with minimal shading, and there's a real beauty, an honesty in his work that you can rarely find anywhere else. I'll try to remember the name and his book and post it here.

    As egerie and broken spirit have mentionned, col erase pencils, markers and pens are always good to use. But I do believe that training your hand and your brain on being extremely light on paper can only help in the end ( seriously, i know it's an extreme bitch to go that light, it's been more than six months, and im still struggling at it sometimes )

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