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  1. #1
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    Angry Hardware VS Large Format/High Resolution ?

    I want to create images at poster size (18x24 and 24x36 inches) @ 300dpi. Now we are talking huge file sizes 110mb to 150mb. Photoshop on my system takes a full two minutes to render out a gradiation at that size, and drawing lines is a "draw and wait" process.

    My comp is as follows:
    Custom Built
    Windows XP
    AMD Athlon 1800+
    1.53 ghz
    512mb ram
    Wacom Graphire 2
    Photoshop 7 with 100% available disk cache being used in setup

    1. Is it a ram issue or a cpu issue?
    2. Is it a Windows XP issue that can only be solved by switching to Mac?
    3. What sizes (ppi) do you use when printing out large format prints?

    Any advice would be appreciated.

    Thanks
    "There are those who lead and those who follow, I just stay out of the way."


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  3. #2
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    My comp has an AMD 3200+, and 1 gig of RAM and it still takes a while to do a gradient at 24x36.

    I don't think there's anything wrong with your comp, I think it's just a freakishly huge file.

    That being said, I can't answer question #3.

    Es fließt durch meine Venen, Es schläft in meinen Tränen
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  4. #3
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    With the same computer as you, I often worked on piece that were 1GB heavy once opened in photoshop (I even worked on a 2 gb pict)
    Of course opening, saving, processing an effect or flipping was long (5 mins), but I never had a "paint&wait" problem as long as I used thin brushes.

    so,

    1/ maybe you disk is full of trash, or fragmented. Anyway add extra 512 MB RAM.
    2/ Personnaly I switched on MacOS, and with my G5, the everage size of my pict is between 1 and 2 GB once opened, any operation don't take more than 30 sec, which I consider reasonable. I can open as many files as I want.
    3/ I work for edition, and I use DPI, not PPI : my print resolution is 300 DPI for a A4 / A3, less for a poster, but never under 200 dpi.

    Hope it helps.
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  5. #4
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    Ok, found part of the problem. Decided to unload Windowblinds and now the same size file renders in seconds instead of minutes. Windowblinds must be a resource hog. And I now have no lag when drawing as well. Hope that helps someone else. Thanks again.
    "There are those who lead and those who follow, I just stay out of the way."

  6. #5
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    Glad you solved your problem. As Arctis said, you can go also down on the resolution a bit with very large images, because they usually will be viewed from further away. If you look at a one sheet or two sheet poster, for instance, you'll find that they're actually printed with a fairly coarse screen.

    Tristan Elwell
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  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell
    ...As Arctis said, you can go also down on the resolution a bit with very large images, because they usually will be viewed from further away.
    I agree. At that size, 150 ppi should look just fine.
    Quote Originally Posted by Arctis
    ...I work for edition, and I use DPI, not PPI : my print resolution is 300 DPI for a A4 / A3, less for a poster, but never under 200 dpi.
    Arctis,

    I checked both Photoshop & Painter's settings and the only choices that were available for image size were "Pixels/Inch" and "Pixels/CM."

    Dots-per-inch is a measurement of your printer's resolution and is separate from pixels-per-inch which is the density of your image's pixels. You always want to go by PPI when setting up an image. Often the requirements for this will be supplied by the client. Here is a page that explains the difference between the types of image density measurements.
    Mark Hannon
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  8. #7
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    Ahhh, that explains why my comp was doing it so slow! I was on 300 PPC not 300 PPI. When I switched to PPI everything ran much faster.

    *hits himself*

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  9. #8
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    You could also paint at a lower res then use a neat little program called GenuineFractals.

    For paintings you could just paint at a fairly high resolution, then if you want to print it really big without "pixelation", increase the size of the final image until it's at the correct pixel density, then save that out to take to the printer's. GenuineFractals uses a different (much, much better) algorithm for scaling than Photoshop does, so it doesn't blur your edges or pixelate the image when scaling up, especially if it starts off fairly high-res as well.

    I believe the trial version has 30ish free uses before you must buy it. You could probably use that a few times and see what the result is like. Might save you painting on mind-bogglingly huge canvases.

    And yes, WindowBlinds is a resource hog of the highest degree - most "visual theme" programs are.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by figure2
    I agree. At that size, 150 ppi should look just fine.
    Arctis,

    I checked both Photoshop & Painter's settings and the only choices that were available for image size were "Pixels/Inch" and "Pixels/CM."

    Dots-per-inch is a measurement of your printer's resolution and is separate from pixels-per-inch which is the density of your image's pixels. You always want to go by PPI when setting up an image. Often the requirements for this will be supplied by the client. Here is a page that explains the difference between the types of image density measurements.
    Yes you're right !
    I use PPI, not PPC.
    Thanks for correction
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