Art: NOOBS!Life Drawing/UPDATE 2ND NOV '05
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    NOOBS!Life Drawing/UPDATE 2ND NOV '05


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    ......................

    wwwhhhaaaaaa!!!,i've been reading loomis,anyway he mentions the holding the pencil at arms length to measure proportions..

    i don't understand hows it done,and i know its quite an old technique too,can someone help me out,explain how to do this??

    Last edited by NOOB!; November 2nd, 2005 at 06:49 AM.
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    Elwell's Avatar
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    There are two ways to use a pencil/brush handle to take measurements.
    (1)Hold your arm out straight, with your shoulder up against your face (as if you were aiming a bow and arrow) and your pencil in your fist. Measure off a unit (height of the head, for ex.) with your thumb from the end of the pencil. You'll probably want to close one eye. Now, keeping your arm straight, see how that unit relates to other parts of the pose.
    (2)Hold your pencil at the very end and use it to measure angles and see how elements line up. For this some people prefer a long skewer or knitting needle.


    Tristan Elwell
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    i see,but i guess the main part i don't understand is,how would i transfer these measurments to the paper? is this technique just to see how many head high a person is? or something else?

    and another questions,how would i do this with a sitting figure or crouching figure?

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    Bone Zone

    Nothing wrong with measuring <> most people do it wrong and end up with some very strange images <> learn to trust your eyes as much as possible <> every time you use a mechanical aid you are cheating yourself out of an opportunity to visualize relationships

    Proportions <> skeletal landmarks <> triangulation <> and negative shapes are all visual tools and part of the visual language <> when you rely on mechanical devices your work ends up looking mechanical dah !

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    mentler yeah,i was kinda worried that i would be getting too much into the technical side of drawing,and all my work would look too robotic and planned.

    I start my life drawing class on saturday,how would u suggest i go about getting my proportions correct?

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    A New Pound of Flesh

    Listen to instructor <> they usual know more than the students <> see what they have to say <> there are dozens of approaches and they all have some value <> never reject any form of knowledge to justify another form <> learning is the fuel <> creating is a matter of choices <> most great artists know dozens of ways to do something and make the choice when the situation calls for it <> listen and learn <>

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    try to go early to your fig session so you can secure a good spot. Try to be close enough to the model so you can see him/her as a whole. Don't be too close or too far. If you're a bit far, you can use comparative measuring( i.e. unit measuring). With this method, you can make your drawing any size as you wish. But I strongly recommend you put the whole figure on your paper. Also keep in mind the composition. If you don't want to use comparative measuring, you can just draw the figure the exact size as you see it, but make sure that exact size is not too small or big for the space within your paper( think compositionally). When measuring, I recommend judging everything by eye, unless you have doubts then you can use your straight edge or pencil to check measurements. This way of measuring is more suitable for drawing your subject the exact size you see it.

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    thanks mentler and patdzon,very useful.

    Mentler,it think the one i'm going to on saturday is just an open session,so it probably won't be a *teaching* lesson,but i think the one on tuesday actually has teaching,so we'll see how it goes.

    patdzon,i think i'd rather have the model fill the page,so i think i'll judge with my eyes,thanks guys again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NOOB!
    thanks mentler and patdzon,very useful.

    Mentler,it think the one i'm going to on saturday is just an open session,so it probably won't be a *teaching* lesson,but i think the one on tuesday actually has teaching,so we'll see how it goes.

    patdzon,i think i'd rather have the model fill the page,so i think i'll judge with my eyes,thanks guys again.

    remember, you can fit the model on the page regardless of what methods you use. Just dont make it too small or big. Give regard to your composition. A really small figure on your big paper won't look right, right?

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    agreed,i think my common sense would stop me from going over board though...i hope...

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    Quote Originally Posted by NOOB!
    i see,but i guess the main part i don't understand is,how would i transfer these measurments to the paper?
    Eyeball it. The ability to draw is more than anything the ability to see and judge relationships. Measuring is just one tool to train your eye.

    is this technique just to see how many head high a person is? or something else?

    and another questions,how would i do this with a sitting figure or crouching figure?
    It's doesn't just have to be head height, it can be any unit. You can use it to judge relative sizes, too, or to find the midpoint of the figure, no matter what the pose (very important for placing the figure on the page).

    All of this is academic until you actually start drawing from life. What seems obscure or confusing in theory often becomes clear in practice.


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    yeap trust your eye..patdzon and mentler have it right on..look at main angles which way the torso the legs the head are going..think of the figure as a whole always

    my new site, is crazy stuff but is my own space, I can say whatever!! hehe:
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    doing a light gesture as an understructure is also a good way to make sure you fit the figure on the page, and it helps to practice imprinting poses into your memory.

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    I use my tumb. It works great.

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    ok guys i attended a proper life drawing clas at The Princes Drawing School here in London,i did some b4,but they where crappy school ones....whats really killing me is the fact that i can see, and i could see during the class what was wrong,what killed me even more is that because we had so little time than usual to do em.i couldn't really correct em.

    I see proportions off *especially in legs* weight off,most things off,things i wouldn't usually have problems with if i was drawing normally.

    life drawing is had lol,hopefully i'll het better,i don't usaully post work i thing is crap,but i care not....i had summore,but i'll post the less crappy ones thanku very much...

    5 mins gestures


    20 mins lying pose


    1 hr lying pose


    i have this thing when i'm observant drawing too,i shade to light,need to work on that.

    i need tips on how to improve in my life drawing classes...

    oh yeh...DAMN U CALVES!!!!

    Last edited by NOOB!; October 30th, 2005 at 05:53 AM.
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    wow i'd say pretty good for your first try! I admire that you noticed what is wrong with your drawings and the fact that you're observant is really important. You're a natural!

    Now a tip I wanna share is getting the angles and measurements of each line you see correct. Obviously, if you get those right, you'll be able to have an accurate outline of your subject. Imagine looking at a line, now scan your eye from point A to point B, that would give you an impression of how long that line is, so emulate that with a pencil stroke. THis is what I mean by judging everything by eye. You could always resort to actual measuring when you have doubts. But training your eye is the most important aspect. In getting angles correct, I suggest practicing your pencil strokes on air before putting it on paper. Do it a number of times so you get a feel for it.

    As for shading, remember that form hit by light has two parts. Those 2 parts are simply light and shadow, one area hit by light and another bathed in shadow. Now as the form turns toward the light, it gets lighter, as it turns away, it gets darker. Keep that in mind. It's also important to analyze a certain form first. Observe how it turns toward and away from the light. Keep in mind the direction of the light and where its coming from.

    BTW Always work from BIG shapes to smaller shapes. Work from the general to the specific. Larger shadow masses to light. Observe big forms like the mass of the rib cage or the whole thigh area, etc. Think how simple those forms are and how light hits it.

    Last edited by Dizon; October 30th, 2005 at 06:11 AM.
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    thanks patzdon,i'll try to improve on everything u mentioned.

    got some studying to do!

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    Some work i did in yesterdays class...slight improvement,still got em proportions work on.




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