glowing blades/other

Join 500,000+ artists on ConceptArt.Org.

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    28
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    glowing blades/other

    i'm not exactly a veteran with photo shop and i'm using it with a picture of a character holing two energy-type swords. obviously, it's not gonna look right unless they glow. can i do that in photoshop? if i can, and anyone knows how, PLEASE HELP ME! i am desperate for this to turn out good.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Concord, CA
    Posts
    77
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Hey Hellraizr, It can be acheived through using your either or both your Brush ( soft or hard) depending what your taste is for the blade..Set to Color Dodge Mode as well as using the Dodge tool itself to maybe broghten it up a bit. I would definetly use the brush on the color dodge mode though.
    Hope this helps
    R

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    12
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    In Photoshop CS i know that you can use the "inner and outer glow" feature on an object that is on it's own layer. You can get there in the layer menu, and control almost every bit of it.

    I would suggest looking at the tutorials by Russel Brown (adobe creative director), he has some great stuff on his site: http://www.russellbrown.com/tips_tech.html

    enjoy.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    753
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 62 Times in 58 Posts
    My favorite way to do it: use my method. Make modifications as necessary, of course, but this technique works well as a basis for many energy effects.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,173
    Thanks
    22
    Thanked 98 Times in 35 Posts

    Talking

    Knocked together a short photoshop action. it makes stuff like:



    The general process is as follows:

    1. Have a layer with a sharp pure white sword on it
    2. duplicate layer, 2.5 px gaussian blur
    3. duplicate blurry layer, merge with a completely black layer
    4. colour balance, adjust to get a good glow in the colour of your choice
    5. blending mode on coloured layer, colour dodge
    6. duplicate coloured layer for good luck

    To use the action, just have 2 layers, background and layer 1. after it's run you can do what you want with the resultant layers. best bet is to do it in a seperate document, merge the layers and paste them into the doc of your choice with blending mode colour dodge.

    Hope this is useful

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    28
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    The layer thing

    okay, i think i understand for the most part, and i appreciate your help. However, i still have a couple questions. Do i want to put only the swords on a seperate layer, or the entire workup? and if i only want the swords, how wuould i do that?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,173
    Thanks
    22
    Thanked 98 Times in 35 Posts

    Talking

    I'm not quite sure I understand the question, but:

    - The process will result in a number of layers (the sharp actual profile of the sword, the white glow, the coloured glow and if you want, another coloured glow). These can be merged down into a single layer wherein they will lose their blending mode information (the layer will be opaque white on black) but this is easily remedied by setting to colour dodge or the like for the same net effect. This makes the sword easier to handle. Also cutting the sword out from the rest of the useless black background that results will make layer transforms easier if you plan on tweaking.

    - If you are really in the mood for serious tweakage of the sword itself, use a colour balance adjustment layer bound to the glow layer you'd normally just run the fairly irreversible colour balance adjustment on.

    - If you're going to run the action (and I intend it only really as an example), place your sword on a new layer (layer 1 is what photoshop will look for) with nothing else and let the magic happen.

    Hope this helps

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    ny
    Posts
    1,686
    Thanks
    29
    Thanked 124 Times in 69 Posts
    this is pretty funny reading all your crazy ass complicated techniques (all works btw). the EASIEST way to make it glow is to "q" for quick mask , mask out the sword, invert that "q" again to exit quick mask, go to select->modify selection contract to whatever size you want your glow, and go to layers->adjustment curve, and pull the curve down to the glow you want it to have. see? easy!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    753
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 62 Times in 58 Posts
    Jrr, that technique won't produce anything like a glowing blade...and there is no Layers>Adjustment>Curve command, either. Perhaps double-check your work?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    ny
    Posts
    1,686
    Thanks
    29
    Thanked 124 Times in 69 Posts
    oh disss!
    layer---> adjustment layer ----curves. got that?


    see? gloooooow.

    Last edited by jrr; October 26th, 2005 at 12:46 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,531
    Thanks
    356
    Thanked 656 Times in 222 Posts
    You know, after trying all the different methods... They all have their uses. Jrr's method takes a bit of knowledge to use the curves properly but can create a more subtle effect as well as an intense effect, definetly the most pro I think, but maybe a little grainy?. The Color Dodge method is nice and quick, a few swipes of the brush and your there. More work in the preperation however, figuring out what exactly you want. The dodge I like least of all, it looks a bit, crummy plus dodge is bad for your soul I hear.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Practically Sarasota.
    Posts
    3,282
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 11 Times in 8 Posts
    There is a luminosity modifier in the color pallette, when combined with a soft brush and low opacity, this can be pretty effective.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Hollywood, USA
    Posts
    134
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    The method I would use is to make it without the glow. Then Create a layer on top of the blade and paint in the glow in what ever color at 100% and then adjust the level style from "Normal" to "Hard Light" or perhaps "Overlay" for something more subdule. You can find the option right there in the layers pallet next to were you would set the opacity for the layer. I use this technique for textures too. I will paint basically flat colors with gradiations and then create the textures by useing a layer above with texture added in black or white and mess with the layer style.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    753
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 62 Times in 58 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Idiot Apathy
    plus dodge is bad for your soul I hear
    When used indiscriminately, yes. It can be useful for certain tasks, but you have to be careful when you use it. Color Dodge can be useful when you're creating glowing objects--much like the Glow brush in Painter--but it can yield disastrous results if used poorly. Generally, avoid using Color Dodge or the the Dodge tool unless if you really want high-contrast, high-saturation, high-brightness areas. For instance:



    Naturally, this exact effect is probably too lightsaber-ish for your purposes. But the basic technique and underlying principles can be used to produce realistic glowing effects. Notice how there is a diffuse, medium-saturation glow that suddenly gains high brightness and high saturation right before reaching the white of the blade? That's how light sources look on film (or CCD, for that matter ).

    I mean absolutely no offense toward you, jrr, but I just don't really think those look like energy blades. Energy blades would give off a lot of light and therefore overexpose in the picture. The core should be very, very close to white; around that, you should see a glow that becomes dimmer and dimmer. The actual blade has hard edges, but the optical effects of the glow create a blurred area.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •