Awakening?
 
View testimonialsView Artwork
Results 1 to 17 of 17

Thread: Awakening?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    17
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Awakening?

    A few month ago i woke up and i realized i want to go into art. Something just clicked. I am good at math and i guess if not that one morning i would just go into programming but now it just seems like a boring dull job. I dont want to dedicate my life to making some bs software for banks. When i was a child i loved legos, then i got into reading books, then it was music and basketbal. I never had interest in drawing, so you can imagine i suck. I am confident however that i can learn. I am very creative and imaginative. I dont thinck i am good anough to apply to art schools for 3d/graphics/animation sort of thing.

    What dou recomend i do? I am thincking to go to some college for a year and while there + my senior year in highschool learn to draw myself and then transfer to a good art school. What do you guys thinck? I am very sensitive about waisting my life. I do not want a boring job no metter how much it pays. I enjoy art - i want my life to be art.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Southeast coast, USA
    Posts
    2,794
    Thanks
    511
    Thanked 505 Times in 341 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    #1 Stay awake in english class. No employer, programming or art-wise will take you seriously when you cannot spell basic words or have decent grammar.

    #2 Go to school for programming, or some other field in which you have had previous talent/skill/long-term interest. It doesn't matter if it's "boring," you will have to make decent money to live SOMEHOW. If you go for something of interest that you can't do well, you will end up flipping burgers for a living. Make art your hobby until you have experience to create a career from it.

    #3 Going to school for art--when you have never previously had interest in it--is what people do when they think it's EASY, or quick to learn. There are many ridculously talented people out there who can't get an art job--you will not stand a chance.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    17
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    My grammar/spelling sucks because i am from Ukraine, so i got an excuse
    I do not thinck it is easy in any way. I am just determined in what i do. Anyways thx for reply and i will most likely follow your advice.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    54
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    My advice is to study alot of anatomy and perspective drawing. That will give you the linear building blocks to the world around you. Take a community college class just to get your feet wet (not sure if they have community colleges in the Ukraine, sorry) Once you get into a healthy habit of sketching EVERY DAY start to experiment with charcoal and value. Once you get to the skill level to easily and confidently render something from life in charcoal (it should look like a black and white photo). Then you can move onto color theory and some oil painting. After that you just keep doing it until you die. God speed...

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    54
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Oh btw.. a major mistake of art students is to only study line. Remember, lines are tools of an artist, they dont exist in real vision, only shape, value, color, light and edge do.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    294
    Thanks
    145
    Thanked 29 Times in 19 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Mirana
    #2 Go to school for programming, or some other field in which you have had previous talent/skill/long-term interest. It doesn't matter if it's "boring," you will have to make decent money to live SOMEHOW. If you go for something of interest that you can't do well, you will end up flipping burgers for a living. Make art your hobby until you have experience to create a career from it.
    You know, I don't think that's a very fair thing to tell somebody. This guy is still in high school. He has pleanty of time to learn, and there have been many successful artists throughout history who didn't draw their entire lives. Some people have a natural talent, but those that don't can still learn to draw. I've seen it first hand. So to tell this kid he's gonna end up flipping burgers for a living just becuase he doesn't have any previous art experience is very unfair. He wants to go to school to learn. That's what school is for. And no offense, but looking at your artwork, if you're getting paid for your stuff then this kid can certainly learn to draw well enough to make some money if he's determined. So how about giving the guy some constructive advice rather than putting him down?


    Quote Originally Posted by Mirana
    #3 Going to school for art--when you have never previously had interest in it--is what people do when they think it's EASY, or quick to learn. There are many ridculously talented people out there who can't get an art job--you will not stand a chance.
    Please. Sure, there are people who go to school thinking it's easy... but you know, just because somebody wasn't very interested in art growing up doesn't mean the only reason they may choose to go to art school is because they think it's easy. He seems genuinely interested in it, and if that is the case he has every right to go to school to learn, and you have no place telling him he doesn't stand a chance.

    I'm not trying to attack you, but your post comes off as very arrogant to me, and it just bothers me to see artists treat aspiring artists like that.



    NoobCraft: You have a long way to go, for sure. But looking at your sketchbook thread, you definately have potential, imo. I've seen far worse stuff from beginner artists. If this is really want you want, then go for it. There will always be people trying to tell you that you won't make it... but you are the only person who can cause you to fail. If you truely want to learn art, go to a good school and work your ass off. If you go to school and find that it isn't for you, then you can always change schools and get back into programming or whatever. There's no harm in trying, and if you don't try then you'll never know.

    Last edited by CruShTinbOX; October 9th, 2005 at 07:26 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Southeast coast, USA
    Posts
    2,794
    Thanks
    511
    Thanked 505 Times in 341 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    To Brumfield:

    Yo, I believe I said:
    Make art your hobby until you have experience to create a career from it.
    That doesn't seem like an end-all, you-can-never-do-it outlook to me.

    I'm around aspiring artists all day, every day in school, work, teaching and personal life. It's not arrogance, it's blunt statements of what I've learned of the thousands of "artists" I've seen over the years. One does not roll out of bed one morning junior HS year and decide that the best career choice to start a year later is something they've never done before (or even been interested in). I would say the same of any career choice taken so lightly. This is common sense.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brumfield
    there have been many successful artists throughout history who didn't draw their entire lives.
    Being independantly wealthy helps that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brumfield
    Some people have a natural talent, but those that don't can still learn to draw.
    I didn't put a time limit on ability, only a reasonable course of action given the onset of college.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brumfield
    And no offense, but looking at your artwork, if you're getting paid for your stuff then this kid can certainly learn to draw well enough to make some money if he's determined.
    Gosh! If only I had art of yours to go to so I could vaguely demean your work! 'Cause that would help my arguement! 'Cause the one has lots to do with the other! Your point isn't valid 'cause you suck! YES!!

    Grow up. Putting "no offense" before a non sequitur jab doesn't actually make it non offensive.

    Disclaimer: Yes, I'm being offensive. Yes, I'm enjoying it. However, this is the only section I'm being intentionally offensive in (though I'm always in trouble, so I'm sure other bits of my writing will come to be just as offensive!! YESSSS!!)

    Quote Originally Posted by Brumfield
    just because somebody wasn't very interested in art growing up doesn't mean the only reason they may choose to go to art school is because they think it's easy. He seems genuinely interested in it, and if that is the case he has every right to go to school to learn, and you have no place telling him he doesn't stand a chance.
    Just because someone posts to a forum asking the validity of going to art school and making a career after not having any interest in it (even going through the trouble to list OTHER interests), doesn't mean they aren't just looking for honest opinions instead of pats on the back. I have every right to say anything I damn well please, but to clarify: I didn't say he didn't stand a chance PERIOD, I said he didn't at this point.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brumfield
    I'm not trying to attack you, but your post comes off as very arrogant to me, and it just bothers me to see artists treat aspiring artists like that.
    And I wasn't trying to attack NoobCraft OR some random guy, but I'm perfectly able to defend myself when someone gets offended at my honesty and attacks me for no reason (Dissent is one thing, personal attacks are another). Oy.

    Noob: I apologize about the spelling/grammar statement not having known English was not your primary language. I deal with English-speaking people all day who cannot spell and it makes them sound unprofessional. Definitely look into proof-reading your writing if you apply to any US or UK schools.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    294
    Thanks
    145
    Thanked 29 Times in 19 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Mirana, I think you are missing my point. You are telling him not to go to art school because he's never drawn before (at the ripe old age of 17). What, may I ask, do you think art school is for? It wouldn't be learning would it? Not everybody knows what they want to do for the rest of their lives the day they are born. It's not like he's a 50 year old guy saying "hey should I just quit my job and become an artist?" He's a kid in high school. That's about the time most people start thinking about what they want to do with their lives. Hell, A lot of people don't even know what they want to do while they're in college, or even after. It's cool if you've been drawing since you were first able to hold a pencil, but that doesn't mean that's a requirement for someone to become a successful artist.

    As for this business that he's not gonna stand a chance at starting an art career right now. Well, to be blunt... no shit. As I understand it, he's not asking if he should jump right in to an art career... he's asking for advice on schooling. These are two entirely different matters wouldn't you say? So why did you even bring up the career aspect of it? It's obvious he needs to actually learn before he can start a career, and he never implied otherwise. With 4 years of art school combined with hard work and determination he could most certainly gain enough skill to get a job.

    I also took issue with your comment that people like him (people who have no previous art experience) only go to art school because they think it's easy, or quick to learn. I went to SCAD myself, fyi, and I knew a lot of beginners who took their education very seriously. I'm sure those people would take offense to such a presumptuous statement.

    Finally, you are right about the jab. I was out of line with that and I appologize.

    Last edited by CruShTinbOX; October 10th, 2005 at 05:26 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    between metro stops in VA, DC, MD
    Posts
    874
    Thanks
    37
    Thanked 57 Times in 39 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    he's only saying to keep learning his other interests because it may take him a little longer to get good enough to start getting money for his art. Don't quit your dayjob until you can make enough cash on your art right? That seems like sound advice to me.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    294
    Thanks
    145
    Thanked 29 Times in 19 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Of course it's sound advice, and I'm not disagreeing with that. But that wasn't what the original poster was even asking about. Going to school is not the same thing as starting a career.

    I mean, the guy is in high school. He's not talking about quitting his dayjob and jumping into an art career. He's asking what we think about his idea to go to art school to learn. We all agree that he needs to learn first, right? Isn't that why one would go to school?

    I'm really not trying to be an ass here, so I'm sorry if that's the way I'm coming across. But I'm actually wondering if you guys even read his post.

    Last edited by CruShTinbOX; October 10th, 2005 at 04:46 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    between metro stops in VA, DC, MD
    Posts
    874
    Thanks
    37
    Thanked 57 Times in 39 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    well you came off as an ass when you attacked his art level, but other than that you're not really being a jerk or anything.

    And to noobcraft, if you're really TRULY serious about this, you're going to have to devote the majority of your days to improving because that shit takes practice and time. I'd say it seems like you've got your plan all worked out, and it sounds like a good one, but if you're going to do this you've gotta realize that it's going to take a shitload of commitment and dedication. Take as many life and figure drawing classes as you can from your school and just basically draw your ass off.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Southeast coast, USA
    Posts
    2,794
    Thanks
    511
    Thanked 505 Times in 341 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Brumfield: Dude, I think you're missing MY point (or at least skirting around it and picking up bits you don't like...because Gauge got it pretty clear).

    So why did you even bring up the career aspect of it? It's obvious he needs to actually learn before he can start a career, and he never implied otherwise
    Most people expect to go to school, to get a degree, to GET A JOB. I would think this is a normal train of thought. In my opinion, art school is to prepare you for a career--though you seem to think it is to magically create a job-ready artist out of nothing. Four yrs isn't enough for that (or as Gauge elouquently put it: "that shit takes practice and time."), especially when the first two are mostly math, science, english, etc.

    It's not like he's a 50 year old guy saying "hey should I just quit my job and become an artist?"
    If he was, he'd be better prepared to do so. Presumebly, he'd have the money to do that and the experience to know that these things take a lot of time. Many people have a day job, or lifetime job for the sole purpose of making money while they do their true love in art.

    It's cool if you've been drawing since you were first able to hold a pencil, but that doesn't mean that's a requirement for someone to become a successful artist.
    I've had many, many friends who have been drawing since elementary/middle/high school, gotten a degree, and are stuck doing mid-wage jobs. This is not some arrogance on my part, it's the, "I have to pay back the Art Institute of Atlanta in one month and I don't even have a retail job!!" or the, "Five years later and I'm just a manager at Pet Smart, barely afloat." or the "The creditors STILL don't know where I am!" of my close friends.

    Why do you make these statements as if my personal artistic ability, job situation, or 2 yr old scribbles have ANYTHING to do with my experience around failed art degrees?? What is YOUR history? Does it have anything to do with your offense towards me? Were you a prodigy who picked up a pencil at 18 and made it a couple years later? Or were you burned by expensive school and bitter that your dream of the perfect go-to-school-to-learn and get the perfect job didn't work out?

    I also took issue with your comment that people like him (people who have no previous art experience) only go to art school because they think it's easy, or quick to learn. I went to SCAD myself, fyi, and I knew a lot of beginners who took their education very seriously. I'm sure those people would take offense to such a presumptuous statement.
    I'm sorry you thought my "easy" statement was all-incompacing. It wasn't meant to be--there are always exceptions. Yay for you going to SCAD--why do I care? Whichever school you went to has nothing to do with the phenominon of "art is easy!" Perhaps you were not around the morons I'm around all day (both at work and school). There are LOTS of them, which stands to reason with the drop-out rates for freshmen and sophmores. I don't really care if anyone takes offense to my bluntness--I thought that was obvious?



    Gauge: Thanks for getting my point. (I'm a chick, by the way.....)

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    between metro stops in VA, DC, MD
    Posts
    874
    Thanks
    37
    Thanked 57 Times in 39 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    no problem, and sorry about that.

    Noobcraft, to sum it up. time, practice, and research. Pour your hear and soul into those three things to improve your art.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    17
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    thx for replys guys =)

    Many of you dont seem to realize that i am not aiming to be an illustrator. I do want it to be part of my job but as a child i did amazing stuff with lego and knowing the basics of 3ds max i desided to focus on that more. I love creating my own worlds.

    I will spend a few years practicing , if i see talent ill do it, if not then ill focus on developing designing software/plugins. My dad is a pretty good programmer and so is my uncle (100, 000+ a year) but after learnign what he does i will not be able to do it. There is no space for ideas or creativity. You are given a problem and you are expected to solve it. Thats it. Id much rather enjoy making something of my own. Heck i might move back to Ukraine and do business from there like its dont in India. Life is more relaxed there and people are more people and social/friendly people then brainwashed robots i see in NY.

    Another question tho, i am more of self teaching person, do employers look for diploma or talent? Is it possible to find a job with no diploma of art school?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Practically Sarasota.
    Posts
    3,281
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 11 Times in 8 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Talent. As I've heard, many, many times, in the end, a diploma, no matter what school, is just a sheet of paper

    "As you can PLAINLY see, I went to RSAD for the whoel 4 YEARS."

    "That's a good place. However your portfolio isn't up to our standards."

    "BUT I WENT TO RINGLING!!!"

    You know, something like that. However, College is a very good place where you are practically forced to practice, and you get great use of facilities (Comp labs >=D),

    And to Mirana, I found none of your first few posts offensive OR arrogant.

    Brumfield... lighten up or something.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  17. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    294
    Thanks
    145
    Thanked 29 Times in 19 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    You're right. I think I just took what she was trying to say the wrong way and I overreacted a bit. Mirana, I appologize.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  18. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Southeast coast, USA
    Posts
    2,794
    Thanks
    511
    Thanked 505 Times in 341 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Noob: I dunno, I think there's a lot of creativity in programming, because not every problem is solved the same way. When you get higher up on the ladder like your uncle is, it's especially rewarding and fun to solve those problems ('cause you're getting paid very well, making your own hours, working from home, etc). ANYHOO, 3D modeling doesn't take near as much drawing skill as technical skill. Some of my modeller friends are horrific with a pencil, but gorgeous with 3D. *shrugs* This you could probably learn in school pretty easily, but it is a very flooded and competitive field (as are all things computer-related :/ ). I think employers are more apt to want to see a degree in this field too just because of the competition and the amount of schools that offer the degree.


    Pixel: So the posts AFTER the "first few" were offensive? AWESOME! My work here is done. XD


    Brum: It's because I admitted I was a chick, right? Guys shouldn't go easy and chicks, they will eat you alive.

    Just kidding (maybe). Apology accepted.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook