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Thread: !!Peer Project!! Foundational Activities - Learning, Teaching, and Toast !

  1. #27
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    Idiot Apathy, I think this is a wonderful idea for a thread and soon I will be joining in... as of right now I am very busy with work and a newly pregnant fiance.... but when I free up some time (maybe the weekend?) I definitely want in on this bag o tricks
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  3. #28
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    Cool dude, I appreciate the enthusiasm, beginning to wonder if this thread was going to die. Start wherever you want; Don't feel like your behind or anything the exercises are meant to be open forever. Oh and Congrats!
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  4. #29
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    Well, I decided to draw along, after having quite some fun in finding a photo of an object I'd like to use. Eventually I wound up with two different situations, one front-lighting from the bottom, the other from a sort of 3/4 high point lighting ('how to be creative with the english language, part I' ).

    The first has a crappy BG, but I like the way the light shows on the standard, though it's a bit too shiny, compared to the actual photo. It's supposed to be dark wood, here it looks more like light... wood I think?

    I like the second a lot better. The shadow on the surface still isn't completely right, but it's the best I could do in a short period of time. I think the overall feel of this one is better than the other...

    Both took me about twenty minutes to do.

    !!Peer Project!! Foundational Activities - Learning, Teaching, and Toast ! !!Peer Project!! Foundational Activities - Learning, Teaching, and Toast !
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  5. #30
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    Looks like an interesting project. I'll have to do it up sometime this week when I find some time.

    Stay gold,

    -Rob
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  6. #31
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    @Sirithduriel: Looking good ! I like how the shadow works on the first one, could be used as a scary sort of effect on another project. I see what you mean by "light wood", wood becomes shiny from the stain etc put on it, dark stains don't seem to be as reflective so less shine perhaps? With shadows like on the second one it might be helpful to just block in some really basic shapes (in this case like a T) to help you get the shadow in the right perspective. Maybe we should do shadows in 2 point perspective later? I'm still trying to completely understand it myself so until then I guess.
    - - - - - - -

    I did another one, the milk jug was too tempting. Started off with a quick sketch next to the photograph after setting up some guidelines. Again pretty sloppy huh? Some pretty lazy ellipses too.

    !!Peer Project!! Foundational Activities - Learning, Teaching, and Toast ! - !!Peer Project!! Foundational Activities - Learning, Teaching, and Toast ! - !!Peer Project!! Foundational Activities - Learning, Teaching, and Toast !
    #1 Lit from behind
    Pretty fun lighting.
    #2 From the right
    This lighting seems pretty good at describing an objects form.
    #3 From the top Right
    This lighting created really interesting shadows I think, at least in comparison to the bland left, right, front and back...
    I forgot to keep the edges where shadows were created crisp in the others so I think the first two suffer a little bit.
    - - - - - - -

    Going to work on a new exercise today, might be up tonight. Hope to see some more people in here soon
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  7. #32
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    [*Disclaimer*] This is from my head, I'm still learning so it's far from perfect. However I think it may be easier to start learning from an amateur viewpoint and build from there. Read through this and then go from there, I recommend following the links at the bottom of this post. Aside from that any and all input and corrections are vital and appreciated!


    A little more about Color Wheels before the next Exercise:

    color wheel n.
    A circular diagram in which primary and usually intermediate colors are arranged sequentially so that related colors are next to each other and complementary colors are opposite.

    col·or n.
    The appearance of objects or light sources described in terms of the individual's perception of them, involving hue, lightness, and saturation for objects and hue, brightness, and saturation for light sources.

    From http://dictionary.reference.com/


    I'm going to use a Simulated Traditional Subtractive Color Wheel used with paints and the like for the purpose of getting the general idea out there. Notice how the values change with the colors, Yellow is the brightest and violet is the darkest. I've got to do some more research on this but I believe it's just because paint is a chemical compound and the resulting mixtures for different hues just come out in different values. This doesn't have as much bearing on our digital medium since we can just pick the color we want However it's a good introduction. Later I will introduce and explain some other color wheels and their uses.

    The Subtractive Color Wheel:
    When light hits an object some light is absorbed and some is reflected. What we see is the reflected light. A banana is yellow (sorta) thus all other hues are absorbed and only yellow is reflected. The Subtractive Color Theory is all about the light that is reflected off an object (in this case paint!) instead of light itself. We could fill pages about this but that is for another time.

    !!Peer Project!! Foundational Activities - Learning, Teaching, and Toast !

    First off the Hues:
    These are placed in the center ring. Starting from 12 o'clock going clockwise we have Yellow, Yellow Orange, Orange, Red Orange, Red, Red Violet, Violet, Blue Violet, Blue, Blue Green, Green and then Yellow Green.

    The Primary Hues (clockwise) are Yellow, Red and Blue; With these colors you can make all others on this center ring and (billions?) in-between. However no hues on the wheel can be mixed to create these hues.

    The Secondary Hues (clockwise) are Orange, Violet and Green. These hues are made with a mix of two Primary Hues. (Note: There are other ways to mix these btw)

    The Tertiary Hues (clockwise) are Yellow Orange, Red Orange, Red Violet, Blue Violet, Blue Green and Yellow Green. Notice how the Primary Hues take precedent in the name? These hues are a mix of a Primary and a Secondary Hue. (Note: There are other ways to mix these btw)

    These hues are all marked in the picture with P, S or T.

    Complementary Hues:
    Most people think this name means hues that compliment each other, i.e. go well with each other. The real meaning is colors that complete each other. For a hue to be complete it must contain all of the Primary Hues in Equal Quantity. (When mixing paint it won't be equal amounts!)

    So Let's start with Yellow; Yellow is a primary color (Check one Primary Hue off) so now we need the other two, Red and Blue. When we add Red and Blue together we get Violet. Violet is Yellows complement.

    Now let's try a Secondary Hue, Orange: Orange is made up of Yellow and Red (Now we can check two Primary Hues off!) Which Primary are we missing? Blue! Orange's complement is Blue!

    Now for a hard one, a Tertiary Hue, Red Orange: Red is in the name (Check One) and Orange is made of Yellow and Red, however we have unequal quanities of these Primary Hues, 2/3 Red and 1/3 Yellow. To make up the difference we obviously have to add some Yellow. We can go from the missing Primary, Blue, and add 1/3 Yellow to get Blue Green. We now have equal quantities of each Primary Hue. Blue Green is the Complement of Red Orange!

    This is how you would do it without a Color Wheel. The Color Wheel is set up so that each hue's complement is positioned directly opposite. Draw a straight line directly through the center and you will reach the complement. I've also added circles of the a hue's complement in the center ring.

    Now theoretically complementary hue's should combine to a perfect gray, meaning no detectable hue, only value.

    Tints:
    Tints are where a color becomes lighter in value. On the color wheel it's created by adding white. This is the outer ring. I imagine adding any color that is lighter than to the other color could be called a tint. However by only adding white you will keep the maximum amount of intensity.

    Shades:
    Shades are when a color becomes darker in value. This can be done with any color that is darker in value. Usually with the Color's complement or with black. Often with the complement however the hue may change slightly. Black's downside is a greater loss of intensity. The black spot in the center of the wheel is to symbolize that combined theoretically these colors should make black, I.e. all light is absorbed. Realistically you'll get a gray.

    !!Peer Project!! Foundational Activities - Learning, Teaching, and Toast !
    !!Peer Project!! Foundational Activities - Learning, Teaching, and Toast !
    Above I have a 5 step example of Yellow and Purple in tints and shades.
    To the left of Hues are Tints. I'm showing Taking the simulated "real" paint Yellow and Violet and adding incremental mixtures of white. (I.e. 80% Yellow 20% White, 60 % Yellow 40% White)

    To the Right of the Hues are Shades. This was done by adding incremental mixtures of black. (I.e. 80% Violet 20% Black etc etc).

    The inside ring of this Color Wheel is 50% of Hue 50% of Hue's Compliment, (I.e. 50% Yellow and 50% Violet).
    - - - - - - -

    Now that we have a general understanding of color and vocabulary to continue it's time to talk about how our eyes see color.

    I should be able to add this in the next few days.

    - - - - - - -
    Please offer any suggestions and corrections!
    - - - - - - -
    Color Links you should definetly read:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_wheel
    So much better than what I have here, but maybe not as easy to understand?
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=9504
    Color Theory 1: By Fredflickstone (A great thread by a great teacher!)
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=9505
    Color Theory 2: By Fredflickstone (Second Part)
    http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/wcolor.html
    More than you would seriously want to know, very scientific and hard to understand. Complete with confusing charts! Almost painful!
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  9. #33
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    This color stuff is great, thanks Idiot Apathy.
    I haven't been able to do any of the latest activities, hopefully I'll be able to catch up soon. Getting ready to move across the country, not too mention trying to find employment when I get there, so things are extremely busy for me.

    Not sure if the shadow of your third milk jug would be that dark, considering the brightness of the bounced light on the object. I still haven't fully read your link on lighting, so feel free to prove me wrong.

    Take care,

    -Rob
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  10. #34
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    **Attention! These Activities have NO due date, they are meant to be done whenever you can, do them and you will still get feedback!**

    @Romance: Thanks dude, good luck with your move and job-hunt. Good catch on that shadow, I definetly concur.
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  11. #35
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    Idiot Apathy > Thanks for the comments! I think less shine would indeed be the key. When I now look at my source image, the shine on the wood there very thin aswell. And your comment about blocking that T shape is pretty much what I should have done. Thanks ^__^

    I like every second try you have shown (at the milk jug and the fire extinguisher... thingie), they indeed describe the form. Though the third for the milk jug is cool too, because of the darker shadows I guess (personal taste maybe).
    That color theory bit you posted is quite interesting, I'll probably read them soon (had my exams for this period, freedom!)

    edit: and I guess more exercises about this are very useful... It's such a vital part of coloring and drawing, one much really understand what's going on.
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  12. #36
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    Some More on The Subtractive Color Theory:
    With Primary Hues you are supposed to be able to mix any color and when combined they should make a perfect shade of gray/black. When mixed Complementary Hues should also create a perfect shade of gray/black. In the traditional Color Wheel (Remember the color wheel is just about what you can mix with what) Red Blue and Yellow are the Primaries. These three do a pretty good job of mixing what you need however when the complementary hues based from this color wheel are mixed they most often create a dull muddy brown or something like it instead of a true gray. So...

    From this comes a new set of Primaries, something I'm sure will sound familiar: Cyan Magenta and Yellow (CMYK [k is for black). With these primaries as the basis of a new (The Modern) color wheel the complements create a truer gray.

    I made a strictly non-scientific example of this. I say non-scientific because the colors are not precise especially the RYB and I'm not a scientist...
    !!Peer Project!! Foundational Activities - Learning, Teaching, and Toast !
    So left to right:
    CMY (Cyan Magenta Yellow)- Yellow + Blue = 96%, Yellow Green + Blue Magenta = 97.5%, Green + Magenta = 99%, Cyan Green + Red Magenta = 98.5%, Cyan + Red 97.5%, Cyan Blue + Orange = 97%.
    RYB (Red Yellow Blue) - Yellow + Violet = 31.5%, Yellow Green + Red Violet = 26.5%, Green + Blue = 0%, Blue Green + Red Orange = 57%, Blue + Orange 93%, Blue Violet + Yellow Orange = 59%.

    CMY = 97.58% Average RYB = 44.5% Average. Even as completly unscientific as this was CMY is the clear winner! Woo!

    Now, take a look at Photoshop and Painters Color Picker/Wheel. Which do they use? CMY of course!

    Now all this being said:
    When you mix any hue with a different hue you will lose intensity, the further away on the color wheel the quicker you lose intensity. So how are we supposed to create all hues with just 3 Primary Colors? Impossible; you can't! Here's where a bit of personal theory comes in; There are 7 Hues in the Visual Spectrum of Light right? These are Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Cyan, Blue and Violet. I'm sure you've all seen a rainbow no? So sunlight carries the maximum of each of these hues with it, if there was an object that aborbed 100% of 6 of the hues and then reflected 100% of the remaining hue you would have the most intense color imaginable. I seriously doubt this has ever been seen or replicated however, on top of that I believe our human eyes can only see in Red Green and Blue so we can only theoretically tap out those hues. Theoretically these Spectrum Hues should be the 7 Primary Hues and from them every color is possible. However if you look in say Painter's/Photoshop's Color Picker/Wheel you will see that colors such as Red-Orange can be every bit as intense even though it is not a Spectrum Hue. Perhaps this is because we have never seen a pure Spectrum hue? I'm not sure.

    Shooo, that was all a pain to put into words. It helps to get it down though, really solidifies it for me.

    For more of this stuff follow the links on the last one, especially the Handprint website if you can handle the jargon. (I suggest small doses!)

    Next time I'm free it will be Additive Color Theory as well as a color activity, I promise!
    Last edited by Idiot Apathy; October 26th, 2005 at 02:48 AM.
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  13. #37
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    @Sirithduriel: Thanks, it's great to know that a few people are getting something out of all this, really makes it worthwhile. Good luck on the exams!

    @Everyone, that means you too ya lurker!: I'm hoping the lack of activity is due to Midterms and Exams, if not tell me what the problem is or what you'd like to see in here, either in a PM or Post, and we'll see what we can do about it! I'd really appreciate it!
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  14. #38
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    Yes, the lack of activity is from exams but heres the stuff I forgot to post earlier:

    !!Peer Project!! Foundational Activities - Learning, Teaching, and Toast !

    I used a mixture or different kinds of purples, to see if it different colours would affect the value. It did, but not very well, because after lookinng at your colour wheel, I need to mix the oposite colours (you might think 'Duh' but my highschool's art department is the cheapest money can buy, LOL, so no colour theorey for us )

    I need more practise with the reflecting light, that is hard. But With the help of that subtractive colour wheel, I think I could have done it better thankyou.

    !!Peer Project!! Foundational Activities - Learning, Teaching, and Toast !

    the next one with the coloured blocks, this was fun to do actually, but it must have took me about 30 minutes.
    !!Peer Project!! Foundational Activities - Learning, Teaching, and Toast !

    I rember from my Sketchbook, Idiot Apathy, you said that the 'dark' side must be made lighter because of the reflecting light from the wall, but it still must be 'dark', I tried to tackle this by making it lighter towards the wall/floor. I don't know if this was done correctly. the reflected coloured light from different shapes, and the floor was difficult, most of the time was spent on this. I got confused as to where to put the shadows and I also missed out some shadows too. Well, I gave it my best shot, and here we are...sorry about the picture quality, that me being foolish and saving it as a gif. ah..well.

    so you like my new avatar, huh?
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    !!Peer Project!! Foundational Activities - Learning, Teaching, and Toast !

    I've been meaning to post this, but work has me super busy.

    I chose the headphones because of the varying materials and I wanted to see if I could tackle a more complex shape. The shadows gave me hell, as you can probably see. Anyway, top-left, your standard light coming from up and right, which is what I seem to default to. Top right, I went for more ambient light, and a lightsource from the front. Bottom right, a very intense light, coming from behind. I wanted to capture a nice glare effect here.

    I'm aiming to try the other exercises soon.
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