Page 7 of 32 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 ... LastLast
Results 79 to 91 of 415

Thread: !!Peer Project!! Foundational Activities - Learning, Teaching, and Toast !

  1. #79
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    4,040
    Thanks
    12,368
    Thanked 1,102 Times in 781 Posts
    Idiot Apathy: Oh yes!! I now see what your talking about and love your crits! I think I was way tired when I made them. I might do them again, darker this time. Thanks a ton... I love this thread.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #80
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Madrid (Spain-Europe)
    Posts
    150
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
    Allright, the 2nd exercise: the milk jar.
    Forget about the drawing, didn't lose even a minute on them.
    !!Peer Project!! Foundational Activities - Learning, Teaching, and Toast !
    !!Peer Project!! Foundational Activities - Learning, Teaching, and Toast !
    __________________________
    http://tayete.blogspot.com
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  4. #81
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    122
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Idiot Apathy
    Part B:
    !!Peer Project!! Foundational Activities - Learning, Teaching, and Toast !
    Red on Red: Because both the paper and the sphere's local color was the same red I figured the reflected light on the sphere would be more intense than either of them. and of course higher in value than the core shadow because I was adding light. Again with the cast shadow I thought very little light other than the neutral enviroment light(gray background) would be reflected into it so I dropped the intensity just a little less than usual and the value about the same.
    Red on Yellow:
    I think when mixing different hues of equal intensity the result will be less intense. I figured a pure red with an equal amount of pure yellow should yield an orange; so I ended up with a fairly intense (red and yellow are pretty close on the color wheel so they shouldn't dull each other too much) orange as the reflected light. Core shadow again, small hue shift less intense and lower value.
    Red on Blue:
    Red is pretty far away from Blue on the color wheel so they will dull each other out pretty quickly. Reflected light was a pretty dull violet. Core shadow little bit of a hue shift, lower value less intense.

    Red ball on yellow paper:

    Paper absorbs Blue, reflects Red + Green (Yellow)
    Ball absorbs Blue and Green, reflects Red

    The reflected light from the paper is Red + Green. The ball would absorb the green and reflect Red only. Not orange, which is 2 parts Red 1 part Green. The ball can't reflect green at all(assuming it's Pure, as you said)

    The yellow paper, on the other hand... Well, it can't absorb the red from the ball, so it would reflect it. It's not reflecting red twice, and green once(from the original White Light). The paper would thus have some orange where it reflects the extra light from the ball.

    With the Red Ball Blue Paper.
    The Blue Paper reflects blue, absorbing Red and Green.
    The Red Ball reflects red, absorbing Blue and Green.

    So, the Red would absorb from the Blue, and the Blue from the red, but they wouldn't actually mix. The Pure Red ball can never be anything BUT red.

    Bringing me to Red Ball Red Paper.

    You could never have anything more than pure red on the ball. I think more red light from the paper would simply saturate the ball.

    I -think- the only reason you see white highlights one colored spheres is because you don't see pure red. At least not in nature. Colored plastic, rubbed, metal. They don't absorb ALL red and green, so where the highest concentration of light is(the highlight), it's reflecting enough of all the colors to appear white.


    This is all from a purely Physics POV, with no painting experience. And once you get away from pure colors, it gets more complicated.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  5. #82
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,531
    Thanks
    356
    Thanked 656 Times in 222 Posts
    @tayete: Welcome to the thread, hope you stick around ! Good results for a first try, the objective of the exercise was just to think about value and how it relates to color. Why you would use a color in a certain area, what color would be appropriate for a shadow area etc etc. Keep it in mind and you'll keep improving. You said you used the desaturate filter, not sure where that is but I think even though it's not perfect you will get more accurate results if you convert to grayscale. Same with the colored blocks, it's there to get you thinking about it, not to show off how perfect you can get it. I'd like to see you try it with a lightsource you think will be a little easier, try something that might hit just one side, or try just one block (and do post it so we can all help you!). In most areas your lightsource seems to be a white light (contains all colors) but on the blue block it seems to be a cool light, making the lightest part a little more blue, the shadows say the object is almost Cyan. The different lightsources object exercise: Your working hard man! Good on ya. On the first one; I'm don't think there would be a dark area on the second part from the top, it should look mostly like your other parts. Unless you planned your lightsource coming from ground level, then there might be a shadow in that area but also on the top cylinder. Ugh, that's rather confusing. Let me know if it needs clarifying. Second one looks pretty good too, I might watch your blending, keep it as a smooth transition (not necessarily a smooth blend) to keep it looking round. Anyways mate, glad to have you in here, keep up the hard work!

    @MattGamer: Sweet dude, glad I could help out. Hope to see some stuff soon.

    @CreationEdge:
    What better way to explain light than through physics? Well... for precision really, not exactly the easiest for everyone to understand. Thanks for taking the time to write all that down, please keep contributing if you feel there is anything else worth saying, your's is a good viewpoint to have in here.

    In reading this I hope I don't come off as defensive, I just want to reason this out; hoping for a little bit of a debate for the purpose of, well ... getting to the bottom of it.

    Your right of course, my chosen verbage of "Pure" was the wrong way to put it. I think it would be almost impossible to have an object that only reflected one wave-length of light right? However I don't think it's correct to think of light as RGB is it? You obviously know more about Physics (I don't know bubkis), but the visual spectrum of light has several discernable hues to it no? I think it's actually a rather large amount right? Our eyes see in RGB though don't they? Does this override that or something?

    Now let's say in a "realistic" situation a Red object absorbs 80 percent of all light other than red light. But next to it is a Yellow object that reflects only yellow light directly onto the red object. The area of the Red Object where this light is reflected would have much more yellow light to deal with, a much higher percentage than before. What if this was in the shadow area, the shadow opposite of the white light containing all the red light? This shadow area would appear yellow wouldn't it? It would be absorbing 20 percent of the yellow light. If we mixed this with some reflected white light into the shadow the extra amount of yellow mixed with the red would mix into like a redish orange no? Is this right? Do my spheres look right to you if they aren't "Pure"?

    Now, hypothetically an absolutely pure red object that reflects only red and absorbs all others wouldn't change at all with a pure yellow light reflected onto it? Sounds right, I guess it wouldn't even have a value change. Reflected light would be ignored entirely, or it would just come back onto the source object making it... no it would then be completely reflected again... after all it's already as pure of a hue as it could get, no notable difference. Wow, the world would be very boring if things were like this.

    Kudos on putting the "white" highlights into words, good stuff.

    Oof, anyways my mind is really stretching here; thanks for the good input, hope you stick around.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  6. #83
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    4,040
    Thanks
    12,368
    Thanked 1,102 Times in 781 Posts
    Here is my stab at Project 1:
    !!Peer Project!! Foundational Activities - Learning, Teaching, and Toast !
    !!Peer Project!! Foundational Activities - Learning, Teaching, and Toast !
    It was exciting to do this once again and to actually know what I was doing (kinda) because of the previous excersize I did (the warm/cold exersize).
    This was all pretty much done by eye. But when I started with the grey tones it was harder to get the color to have the same tones with it. I think it's much easier in the grey, but what would life be with only grey. It would be like that movie... Pinesville... gosh I forgot the name. But you get my jiff.
    EDIT: I just realized, after changing my desktop color from the 16-bit it was to 32-bit; and found that the color ball is very faded. Gosh, what did I do! Must fix this!

    I didn't know there were more projects to do (ie. sketch the object and shadow it, etc). I only thought there were 4 so far. I can't wait to get started on them all.
    And thank you, Idiot Apathy, for your kindness and warm welcome to the thread. I would love to be in a class taught by you anyday.

    UPDATE: I got a lighter green and re-did a few things here and there to make them look like balls. Haha.
    !!Peer Project!! Foundational Activities - Learning, Teaching, and Toast !
    !!Peer Project!! Foundational Activities - Learning, Teaching, and Toast !
    Last edited by MattGamer; December 7th, 2005 at 03:49 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  7. #84
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    122
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    I hope I didn't come off as trying to be anything but helpful. I only used "pure" because you did and it's the easiest to explain and clarify.
    Now let's say in a "realistic" situation a Red object absorbs 80 percent of all light other than red light. But next to it is a Yellow object that reflects only yellow light directly onto the red object. The area of the Red Object where this light is reflected would have much more yellow light to deal with, a much higher percentage than before. What if this was in the shadow area, the shadow opposite of the white light containing all the red light? This shadow area would appear yellow wouldn't it? It would be absorbing 20 percent of the yellow light. If we mixed this with some reflected white light into the shadow the extra amount of yellow mixed with the red would mix into like a redish orange no? Is this right? Do my spheres look right to you if they aren't "Pure"?
    Your real life situation, which is likely what you'll deal with(This is a correction, just me trying to reason things out. Feel free to skim.):

    The "Red", or reddish, object would likely reflect as much green as blue. (Let's just assume that, for this situation). Because they're reflected in the same amount, you'd simply get a lighter reddish ball. You can see this if you open up a color editor, such as in Paint or Photoshop. Set RED to 250, GREEN and BLUE to 0. Note the color. Now, set GREEN and BLUE to 100.

    If you used Paint, did you notice what happened when you changed green first? You made orange. AKA, the HUE changed. But what happened when you changed the blue as well? The HUE returned to 0, the SATURATION decreased, and the LUMINOSITY increased. AKA, it stayed red, but just got brighter and less saturated.

    Back to the ball. Let's assume the objects are the Red Ball Yellow Paper.

    So, we have a white light source, and a red ball on yellow paper. The Red Ball absorbs 80% of light other than red. For simplicity, we'll deal with only Green and Blue. Therefore, it reflects 20% Green, 20% Blue, and 100% Red. The ball appears as a lighter red color.

    However, the ball is receiving reflected light from the paper. The paper reflects 100% Green and 100% Red light(Not-bright Yellow). The ball itself will 80% of that Green and 100% of that red back in places. Those said places would indeed reflect a light orange color(don't forget the 80% Blue from white light). On your colored example I think the color is spot on with what I got.

    As for the yellow paper... Let's talk about the shadow. It wouldn't be black, because there's some ambient light. Even then, it'd be a dark yellow. Now we take the ball into account. It'll reflect in some places what Red light it can, not to mention the Yellow from the paper itself that the Ball reflected(Bouncy light, heh). This would make the shadow a) A little lighter b)Be reflecting more Red than Green. In this situation you wouldn't just get a daker yellow shadow, but more of a goldenrod(almost orange, but more yellow).

    What all my rambling leads up to:

    Your Red Ball on the Yellow Paper would be colored correctly, but your Shadow isn't.

    Red Ball Blue Paper:
    Same red ball as before. Let's say the blue paper reflects 100% blue, but also 20% Red and Green. (Just a lighter blue)

    That light hits the red ball, which absorbs a lot of that blue and some of the green, and none of the red. (Mathematically, the green reflected from the ball would only be a measly 4%)

    So now, in some parts, the ball is reflecting 120% red(100% from source, 20% from paper), 40% Blue(20% from source, 20% from paper), and 24% Green(20% from source, 4% from paper).

    I figure this to be more of a light burgundy, wine color.

    The paper is reflecting in the shadow red from the ball and the light, blue from the light, and green from the light. This time it's more blue than red, so you'd get some sort of indigo, I think.

    So, again, your ball is pretty accurate, but the shadow should be changed.

    I hope no one is daunted by all my wordiness. The process is actually much simpler if you don't explain it, lol.


    Summary:
    When dealing with shadows on objects like this, take into consideration the ambient light, and light that'll be reflected off of nearby objects. (The light from the paper to the ball back to the paper). The source color of light as well as the color of the objects is very important in determining the colors you get when their reflections combine.


    I do suppose that if you keep this in mind, you can figure out the more exact color of an object. Let's say that you're given the Red Ball Yellow Paper, and told nothing else. You see the red ball, orangish reflection, goldenrod shadow, and yellow paper. By working backwards you can figure say "Hey, this ball reflects some blue and green and tons of red, and this paper a lot of yellow." Now, when you introduce a third object of a different color you can more accurately color its shadow and reflections!

    Hope I'm helpful
    -Edge
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  8. #85
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,531
    Thanks
    356
    Thanked 656 Times in 222 Posts
    I'm going to try and get another exercise/experiment up around Saturday, I should have a healthy chuck of time to do it then; Probably something on color.

    Anyone else think they have an exercise, experiment, or just plan notes/lecture/interesting topic; that they would like to contribute? Let me know! Let's flood this thread with some good stuff!

    Oh and everyone please feel free to comment on everyone else's work! I'm feeling a little alone in doing so, remember I'm just one of your peers too dammit!


    - - - - - - - - - - - -
    @MattGamer: Looking good dude, your starting to see how it pays off to think about these things. You'll just keep getting better and better and adding to your repertoire. Your values seemed to turn out pretty good, now I think you should try messing around with intensity. Think about what happens when something recieves more light/less light, what will happen to the intensity? Just as a little guidline, (but please experiment, you'll understand it much better!), usually as an object recieves more light it will become more intense, (This is very general and it's more complicated than that) less light less intense. Try mixing this in with your next spheres and see how you do with value matching. I'll put a link to all the projects on the front page so no-one else misses them, thanks. Oh and, if I taught a class even I would ask for my money back. I'm just passing on what little I know, hopefully we can get some more people in on this and they can spread some of what they know around. Peace.

    @CreationEdge: No no, you came off as helpful. Thanks. When I did this I didn't think very much light if any would be reflected off the shadow side of the sphere into the paper, I wasn't really thinking of the reflected light properly. I also didn't think any light coming off of the shadow side would affect it very much, I was very wrong! Good stuff man, It's great to talk about these kind of things, it's too hard to completely flesh it out in your own head. Gunna use this knowledge now.

    It's a bit hard/odd for me to think of light in just Red Green and Blue. I think in a more Artist fashion I think of light in a complete color wheel. Even though the visual spectrum is quite as broad as a color wheel (I think...); a color wheel can still serve the purpose of representing all the colors we usually see. If you go in a straight line straight across the color wheel say from yellow to red, the middle of the line will land in orange, the line will also give you an indication of the intensity as well. For example take a complimentary colors, say Orange and Blue. Draw a line straight across to each other and you will get nothing but gray, no hue change. The closer to the middle the closer it will be to gray, the value of gray is determined by the values of the two original colors. This won't work with the traditional color wheel though, it's off. I think however the "modern" color wheel works perfectly. I know photoshops or painters does. I think I'll type this up with pictures and post it as a example. Anyways, for me it's a lot easier to compute the color visually rather than mathematically with RGB values, but we all work differently huh?
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  9. #86
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    122
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Well, I'm sure your way is much easier! I confuse myself sometimes the other way, but I've not had any color theory at all, so all I have to go on is what I do know, and that's Light from my Advanced Physics class last year.

    There was another topic where someone and I got into a discussion about it. He brought up a good point about light. Not all light sources are white light, and not all of those colored ones. You have to remember, though, that colored light sources are either A) Combinations of RGB or B) A color from the visible spectrum. That is, if you have a magenta or cyan light, your light is a combination of RB and GB respectively, because magenta and cyan don't exist in the visible light spectrum.


    I got Painter IX a couple days ago. Its color mixer looks like it'll be fun to play around with. I only wish I had a Wacom
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  10. #87
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,531
    Thanks
    356
    Thanked 656 Times in 222 Posts
    Let me ask you something then, what colors exactly are in the visual spectrum; actually exist in a pure state and aren't mixes of other colors? Surely it isn't just RGB right? Is it truely the colors of the rainbow?

    Hmm, I wish they had something like a physics for artists; sometimes art could use more science and less "guidelines" I think.

    If your serious about art; well digital art at least, or just as a fun hobby, you should get a tablet. A Graphire4 should run you around $90 or so as a student.

    Edit: Here is a good link that explains much of my confusion...
    http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasc...0/phy00871.htm
    Last edited by Idiot Apathy; December 7th, 2005 at 11:23 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  11. #88
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    122
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    That type of tablet is only 90$? Do you know where online I could get that, or what store would surely carry it(Best Buy?)? If it's only 90$ I might be able to get it for X-mas(As opposed to the 350$ Intuos3 which I'll have to buy myself when I get a job)

    I'm definitely serious about art. I really want a friggen tablet so I can use Painter to its full advantage.

    Back to your question:

    Yes, the colors of the rainbow are the colors of the visible light spectrum.

    Here's an image I nabbed from NASA that shows the complete VLS.

    !!Peer Project!! Foundational Activities - Learning, Teaching, and Toast !

    If that doesn't work for some reason, the link is http://wfc3.gsfc.nasa.gov/MARCONI/im...c/spectrum.jpg (I did a google image search of "visible light spectrum")

    BTW, that link is VERY good. Whoever that is explains it all much more concisely than I could. It explains a little test I did one day in Art:

    In Light, Red + Green = Yellow. Those are the actual primary colors. But not in art.

    So I got out some Red paint and some Green paint. I mixed the two together and got... DARK BROWN.

    The Red Paint absorbs Blue and Green. The Green Paint absorbs Red and Blue. Mix the two together, and you now have a color which absorbs ALL 3 colors, and thus appears blackish.


    It's a good point to make. The way you figure out what colors to use is very different from how you actual mix the colors with paint.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  12. #89
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,531
    Thanks
    356
    Thanked 656 Times in 222 Posts
    Not sure where you live but yeah most big electronic's stores should have them, probably for around $100. I might try http://www.pricewatch.com/ though, I think you'll find some good deals as well as some student discount stores. I have a graphire2 from a few years ago and have gotten great use out of it (time to upgrade though I think). Graphire is made by Wacom, same as the Intuos, so it's a good piece of hardware.

    Thanks for the link, I couldn't find any visual spectrum charts with the names. However... in the chart I clearly see oranges and yellow greens etc. Is it possible to have a color not named in the chart every bit as intense as one that is named? It would be a mix so that would leave me to believe it would turn out to be a tint of a color, like you had added a little bit of white.

    That's a good story about mixing Red with Green, the traditional color wheel would say that these colors are complements so they should end up as a perfect gray (given that the paint pigments were pure). However the modern color wheel or what PS or Painter would rely on, Red's compliment is actually Cyan. Using a color wheel drawing a line from Red to Green on the M. Color wheel you'd be surprised to see that the color you made (if it was 50% red and 50% green of the same value/intensity) was actually a yellow! Very cool stuff, amazing how math creeps into everything.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  13. #90
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    4,040
    Thanks
    12,368
    Thanked 1,102 Times in 781 Posts
    tayete: Nice work on the jar project. Though it does look like you went very quick on the first one. The proportion of the jars do seem a bit wacked... maybe they could be done again, but smaller? I find that if I don't have to make HUGE paint strokes and when I can see the whole image at one time; it's easier to get the right look.

    Idiot Apathy: I have a Wacom Graphire 2 too! I need to upgrade so badly, but I can never keep the $350+ that I need to get it. Even on Pricewatch and Newegg.com they're expensive. Though I cannot wait to get an Intuos 3 and to use the pen as a shader and all the other phat features it has. Gosh, way back when I got my Graphire for $99 off of Pricewatch. Now that much can buy a Graphire 4! Wow.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  14. #91
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    122
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    If it's not named on the visible spectrum, that just means there's not a wavelength of that light, and we see it in a combination. Magenta, I think I've said... The only way it exists is in the human eye, triggered by Receiving Red and Blue wavelengths of light.

    Also, don't rely on Photoshop for correct color combinations. It will only give you the correct combinations for LIGHT, but not for the paints themselves. Painter, on the other hand, is made to simulate paint, and from what I've experimented with it will accurately reproduce paint.


    Oh, the red and green paint I used was some really cheap finger-paint quality stuff, and I have no idea if I mixed equal amounts. The bottles were labeled Red and Green, though, lol.


    Back to the Wacom since we're talking about it. I heard that if you're serious about it you should get a 6x8, but those are still nearly $200 to over $200. Over twice as much as what you said, but of course 6x8 is over 2 times the size of 4x5.

    I've drawn out both sizes on a piece of paper, and I don't think a 4x5 will do it for me.

    Is there another brand that's not WACOM but still reliable?
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

Page 7 of 32 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 2
    Last Post: April 26th, 2012, 11:58 AM
  2. SketchBook: Lumars peer project sketchbook.
    By lumar in forum Sketchbooks
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: June 27th, 2010, 03:13 AM
  3. Art: Human Anatomy ( PEER )
    By Shahbaz in forum 3D ART, SCULPTURE ART & TOY ART
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: July 19th, 2007, 09:20 AM
  4. Peer project ( Vol 1 or Vol2 )
    By virtual in forum ART COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: December 28th, 2006, 06:39 AM

Members who have read this thread: 72

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook