Is using a mouse ok?
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  1. #1
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    Unhappy Is using a mouse ok?

    I just got painter a few days ago, and im a ametuer artist, like real toddler like. Anyways, i noticed all this talk about wacom this and wacom that and i asked myself, do i need this to be good? Working with painter is hard, especially for me and my mouse. I was just wondering how many here draw with a pen thing, and how many with a mouse. Obviously it is easier with a pen, but is the mouse really that bad?

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    you must be a masochist...

    are you asking to get Carpal Tunnel?
    GET THE PEN NOW!!! Can you imagine writing an essay using a mouse?

    Rob a bank if you have to...

    It might feel a bit awkward at first...but dont worry, you'll get used to it

    I have to say though - I heard somewhere that Mullins used to paint with a mouse... but I guess back then he had now choice - there were no wacom drawing pads...

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    Bottom line: yes, it's possible to do fine art with a mouse, but it really is a little masochistic.

    There are two main benefits to using a tablet, besides the very valid ergonomic reasons Rascar Capac mentioned.

    1. A mouse is much less precise than a tablet. Mouses are designed with the cursor's destination in mind. Tablets are designed with the path the cursor takes to its destination in mind. It's a key difference. Some people can develop an uncanny ability to draw or paint with a mouse, but it's way beyond most people's abilities.

    2. More importantly, tablets are pressure sensitive. They can detect how hard you're pressing on them and change the appearance of your art based on that pressure. You can set pressure to control brush size, opacity, and/or a host of other options. No amount of finagling will get you this control with a mouse. You would not believe how much difference pressure sensitivity makes.

    If you have the money, buy a tablet. Simple as that. Wacom's Graphire line is great if you don't plan to get really serious about painting. If you think this may be a long-term interest that you really want to develop, go for their more expensive but higher-quality Intuos line. I have an Intuos3 4x5, and it's a dream come true. With tablets, size really doesn't matter.

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    sounds great, i think i'll buy one. I just want to know if it's hard to set up or if it has any issues with windows 2000 and painter IX. Are there any bugs? Does anyone know of any sort of special offer or discount available?

    thanks alot everyone, and hope to become a par tof the community soon!

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    Wacom is better, but I'm such a computer geek that a mouse is comfortable too, as long as the mouse is optical....of course you wont have pressure sensitivity with a mouse.

    Which is really what people are looking for in a Wacom...line variation.

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    Check the Wacom site for their currently available list of refurbished tablets. They come with a one year warranty and all the bundled software that comes with their new and more expensive tablets.

    The list changes frequently, so keep an eye on it if you don't see something you want right away.

    Be sure to buy a USB tablet since that's what newer computers use, USB connections instead of the older serial connections.

    Here's the URL:

    http://www.wacom.com


    P.S. Don't even consider buying another tablet brand. Wacom is the best, with solid products that work well. Their tech support is friendly... and free!

    P.P.S. The oft-quoted description of using a mouse is:

    "It's like trying to draw and paint with a brick."


    Jinny

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    Wacom is the best. Goes without saying.

    However I am a student and I am poor. So I bought a cheap Wacom Clone from Tesco. And it's brilliant. Too small, and a bit sh-t... but still brilliant.

    Of course I would trade it for a Wacom any day, but I now have 80 more than I would have had in my bank account AND a tablet with 511 more pressure levels than a mouse.

    Cheap tablets are crap, but also underrated.
    For the price they are they offer a lot.

    Last edited by MikeMakesMonkeys; September 22nd, 2005 at 08:37 PM. Reason: The technical support is poo as well
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    My god son, why not draw with a rock?
    Save 20 Bucks a week and buy a Wacom Intous III please.


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    A poor workman blames his tools...

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    Do these tablets work with Painter IX? does P-1X have native support for these wacom tablets? Does one need to spend more on additional software? Also do they have drivers for windows operating systems?

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    A volito costs 50 Euros I think its a good starters tablet if you want to explore the medium but are a bit unsure. Drawing with the mouse is very hard but coloring with it is not that bad if you don't mind doing selections all the time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by crion
    Do these tablets work with Painter IX? does P-1X have native support for these wacom tablets? Does one need to spend more on additional software? Also do they have drivers for windows operating systems?
    They certainly do work with Painter IX, and earlier versions as well! Painter and Wacom tablets are a perfect match, each product designed to take advantage of the other products capabilities. Wacom tablets, take full advantage of Painter's many brush controls to make painting a wonderful experience with brushstroke size (width), opacity, grain (texture), and numerous other parameters controlled by pressure (along with other Expression options).

    I've been using Wacom tablets since the mid '90s on a PC and they're wonderful. My current tablet is a 6 x 8 inch Intuos 2 which I've owned for a couple of years. It has 1024 levels of pressure sensitivity and supports Tilt, meaning brushstrokes can be controlled by the angle at which the stylus (pen) is held in relation to the tablet surface. Good for airbrushing, for instance.

    My previous Wacom tablet was an ArtZ II about the same size but with fewer levels of pressure sensitivity (as I recall). I used it for 8 or 9 years every day and it's still in good working order.

    6 x 8 inches is the working area and the entire tablet is about 13 inches wide by 10 inches high. It's a good size to allow me to have both the tablet and keyboard side by side on my desk and make it easy to use both without having to move anything around.

    If money is an issue, the Graphire tablets are fine. They have fewer levels of pressure sensitivity (512) and do not support Tilt which is not a necessity for most artists.

    The smaller, 4 x 5 inch (working area) tablets are also fine, especially for a beginner or someone on a budget.

    Check the Wacom site at http://www.wacom.com to learn more about their tablets and check the list of refurbished tablets, too, for lower prices. (On the main page, click Wacom America. On the next page, click Store at the top of the page, and on the next page, click the link to Refurbished tablets on the left side of the page.


    Jinny

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    Pressure sensitivity is one of the biggest advantages to tablets. With enough practice, most people can theoretically become proficient at drawing with a mouse. But no amount of practice will give you pressure sensitivity with a mouse. You need a tablet for that. Trust me, it makes a HUGE difference.

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    I did mouse painting for a year almost every day when i started and , well , is hardcore.For a drawing that now it takes me 2-3 hours to finnish with the mouse i have spent 5-7 days 4-6 hours/day with the mouse.You will train your patience real hard with that .You can paint but you can't draw lines .Anyway mai advice is to buy a liitle wacom graphire it is not that expensive and the difference is actualy huge.With the wacom actually you draw, with the mouse you will be forced many many times to do maximum zoom and try to hit those pixels so get to the store buy a wacom.Try to make your life easier.

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    As a traditionally-trained artist (oils, some acrylics, good at sculpture too) I just only recently bought a Graphire and now wonder what took me so long. Budget was an issue (one income here with two kids so ...) Yes, I'd only dabbled with digital art before using a mouse but the tablet has made all the difference now. It's wonderful to use! It took about two days of fun (and frustration) to figure it out but once there it is the only way to work IMHO. If you can't afford the Intuos, grab a Graphire. It's like night and day compared to trying to do stuff with a mouse. It's put the fun into playing with digital painting apps. Just my $0.02.

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    Hey people who like to work on Paint:
    Please send me samples of your work for my book. I am presently working on assignment for McGraw Hill and need some illustrations for Children's books. I would also love to see some romantic pictures for adult love poetry if you have any. No nudes or porn please. I am a published author and we can work out a deal if I pick you. Am particularly interested in young new talent.
    Thanks,
    Great stuff on this forum
    MEXICANELYH

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    MEXICANELY, instead of off-topic posts in random threads, you'd do much better to post any job offers here . Also, could you please edit your Location so it doesn't run off the screen?


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    Quote Originally Posted by ThreeToedSloth
    I just got painter a few days ago, and im a ametuer artist, like real toddler like. Anyways, i noticed all this talk about wacom this and wacom that and i asked myself, do i need this to be good? Working with painter is hard, especially for me and my mouse. I was just wondering how many here draw with a pen thing, and how many with a mouse. Obviously it is easier with a pen, but is the mouse really that bad?
    There are some things you can only do with a mouse, and there are some things you can only do with a tablet pen. And there are many different types of pens. Not only different manufacturers and brands, but also various models and sizes per brand. Wacom is kind of like the Microsoft of tablets, and they are recognized as the pro tablets you'll eventually want to use. If you're starving artist living in Europe, try their Volito model, www.my-volito.com or look for other brands. Eventually though realize that there's more to it than the tablet. There are various types of pens, even some which look and feel like spray guns for spray paint. (airbrashing). And there are some which detect more than pressure, such as the angle at which you're holding the pen, ir the rotation (twist) angle. Not all software will make use of it though, so again be sure you don't waste much needed money into something that your software can't handle yet. Unless you like to plan ahead. Eventually you'll probably get your hands on a tablet PC (driven by Wacom technology) or a Cintiq (tablet in the screen, also by Wacom)

    I have a few others listed at www.thebest3d.com/dogwaffle/links in the tablets section near the top

    Sometimes you get really good discounted show specials at tradeshows, like $50 or less. Some refurbished ones from Aiptek are seen around $30. Wacom refurbushed ones also exist. Check their store.

    They usully also include a nice collection of software.

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