What exactly is A Gesture Drawing? - Page 2
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  1. #31
    Arshes Nei's Avatar
    Arshes Nei is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
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    To the above post.

    Huh?

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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by ivor View Post
    not watching is picture but watching the skeleton.
    I found this secret only don't believe in my eye.
    My interpretation in the form of a haiku:

    If you begin with muscles:
    wonky skeleton.
    The gesture is in the bones.

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  4. #33
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    not only...
    im'am a left handed...
    so... my weakness is also my power.
    i speak for image.
    i understand what it's wrong and what is is good in a picture.
    so when i watch the skeleton there is a thing i did not like.
    So...i found this..one.
    Even betty edward speak not only dx brain...
    for example:
    you draw wath you see...right...
    but you also think...you really like wath you draw?
    i think many artist really don't understand what is a body.

    Last edited by ivor; July 4th, 2010 at 06:46 AM.
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  5. #34
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    just for confirm my recent discovery..
    Brigdeman has sensed study michelangelo.
    i have discovery study the skull.
    and now i have sensed what michelangelo have done.
    One advise:
    If you training with skull:
    DON'T USE NEGATIVE SPACE,
    FORGET FORM!

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  6. #35
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    Since I teach a class on gesture drawing I poked into a number of illustrated conversations on the subject including this one and compiled an introduction to gesture drawing for my students.

    Gesture drawing is an important step in creating an expressive character. There are many approaches to gesture drawing and I think it is important to see examples of many of them and try different types of gesture drawing for yourself. You will learn more by trying many tools and techniques for gesture than trying to create a single ideal for gesture and sticking to it. Professionally, broad hands-on knowledge of gesture is important because there are unique gesture stories within every story you are visually telling and in the action of every different character.

    http://www.slideshare.net/honoria/ge...g-introduction

    Let me know what you think of this introduction to gesture.
    If I am missing some important element I'll add your recommendation to the mix:-)

    Honoria
    --
    Save your pessimism for the good times
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  7. #36
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    You shouldn't be teaching anyone. Judging by your profile and website you don't have the skill set that's needed by concept designers or animators. A bunch of different things are being discussed in those quotes in your link, you would catch that if you knew what you were talking about.

    Sketchbook

    "Beliefs are rules for action"
    "Knowledge is proven in action."
    "It's use is it's meaning."
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  8. #37
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    After a few years of studying Nicolaides I still adhere to my first impression that the gesture is what cannot be drawn, and as such it includes aspects of rhythm, stress, weight, speed, action, impulse. It also explains the struggle so many seem to have with the concept.

    The harder I try to understand it, the more I'm convinced that the way it is usually presented is incorrect, or, at least, not in line with Nicolaides. It is often taught as a warming up, as a quick sketch, as a summary, and although I believe these are valuable aspects, I don't think these are true gestures, as they seem to isolate the gesture, as opposed to working it throughout the stages of a drawing, until completion.

    In my own efforts, whatever I capture in a gesture gets usually lost in the final piece, which makes me believe it is not a true gesture. I believe it is deep concept, and I will continue my struggle towards better understanding.

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  9. #38
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    Thumbs up

    After watching the Sheldon's DVDs multiple times, I think I'm finally starting to have some clue as to what gesture mainly is about: movements of the rhythm ("energy flow") that courses through and on the surface of the human form. If you can "see" and feel these movements and the directions they are going, then getting the gesture down on paper comes a lot more naturally. + Motivation + Weight + Balance.

    Very likely I could be wrong, but this is what I've been pondering a lot about recently, because in the past, I used to read articles and books to find out how to do gesture drawings, and these books always say "Gesture drawing is drawing what the subject is DOING, not what it is", but could never even understand the text. Now that Sheldon explains it, I think I've a clearer picture.

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  10. #39
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    Say you have Superman punching the lights out of some supervillain. Now, put Mickey Mouse in the same pose, so he's doing the same thing as Superman. You can't just stick his arm out- he needs to be punching the lights out of the supervillain. You can do this, even though Mickey's proportions are very different from Superman's.

    That's gesture.

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  12. #40
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    dpaint is offline Registered User Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
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    Two words
    Giovanni Boldini
    Boldini was as successful as Sargent and was known for his society portraits Even his sitting, not doing anything poses are moving
    they are all gesture.
    Check him out and see if you can spot it

    http://tinyurl.com/25u9cmq

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  14. #41
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    nice link to do gesture drawing here

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