Any landscapers?
Join Free Art WorkShopJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Any landscapers?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    New Hartford, NY
    Posts
    151
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Any landscapers?

    Hi,

    I'm wanting to get out and paint outdoors much more. I'm doing small studies now and want to eventually produce larger works from these.

    Any critiques or advise very welcome.

    Oil 5x7
    scars,streaks,and smudges due to careless use of my cd case

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    4,049
    Thanks
    644
    Thanked 1,273 Times in 408 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    This isnt really my comfort zone, but ill try to help.

    When you have this little detail, you should make sure that you have solid lightning and composition. You could try giving it all a new pass, adding more detail with each iteration.

    The foreground looks too big, empty and boring. Maybe adding some elements here, to avoid this. Even if there's nothing in the reference, you have your artistic license to substitute reality with your own.

    Sorry to be so vague, but as i said, this is not my field at all.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    47
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Hi

    Well I think going out and painting studies from nature is a good thing, I've only recently started doing that with watercolors and I think it works really better than anything else....

    As to this piece, every painting should have a center of interest, something that stands out from the rest and where the eye is drawn to. I think there is none, at least I can't make out one. That is essentially the same Slash ment with empty and boring....

    Take a look at this, should be really helpful for you

    http://www.wetcanvas.com/Articles2/135/120/

    Cheers

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    20
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    This is a nice plein air painting. I don't think you necessarily need to have the rule of the center of interest in this type of "sketch". However, I do think adding some contrast (this may be an artifact of the scan) would help.

    For quick studies, I think this is good. See the "Life Painting" thread here:

    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=9562

    Lots of plein air landscapes in there...

    Keep it up!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    the Netherlands - Rotterdam
    Posts
    1,715
    Thanks
    157
    Thanked 209 Times in 127 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    try to look to your colors, are the clouds you see really white? The grass and trees totally green? And you can also wonder how you create effects of things, don't just add black to your green, when you are creating shadows. try to use other colors, like complementairs or maybe a mixture of 2 colors, creating a totally new, even darker color. (I like to create dark colors by a mixture of brown and blue for example)

    hope this helped you a little bit

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    On the fringes of "acceptable" observation and commentary.
    Posts
    2,347
    Thanks
    255
    Thanked 136 Times in 60 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Are you varnishing these?
    I'm seeing "brush strokes" sweeping across large color changes, with no accompanying smear of colors, and the painted landscape is too smooth for it to be large gesso strokes...what be the dealio?

    ~M

    Change is Inevitable, Growth is Optional
    I am The Choosen One!
    Jason sez: Draw more from Life!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    291
    Thanks
    44
    Thanked 52 Times in 22 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Landscape painting!

    Working plein air is fantastic, and I've been doing it for the past couple years... So here's what I think about the whole process...

    First of all, (and also the most important part of this message) always wear long sleeves, sunscreen, brimmed hats (baseball caps or something with a large brim to cover your eyes)... There are also some sunglasses that aren't tinted that do offer 100% UV protection. A combo of a brimmed hat and untinted sunglasses is best. The reason I say this is because your eyes are your most valuable possession. And cancer sucks. Try to take care of yourself when working outside.

    As far as composition goes, yeah... yours is particularly plain. But as far as "editting" what you see, I whole-heartedly DISAGREE with that notion. Nature is beauty, don't be so presumptuous to try to change it. (just a personal feeling) Try to be more particular when you choose where you're going to paint. Don't rush to sit down immediately and start painting. The trees aren't going anywhere. Take some time and walk around and find a moment that really strikes you and then do your magic!

    Try not to spend more than 3 hours (maximum) on any given painting due to the shift of the sun. The amount of time you can spend on a painting will obviously vary depending on the time of day. (less time during sunrise/sunset more time during noon... and obviously loads at night)

    edit- A point I forgot to make... If you plan on sustaining a painting from life over a great length of time (Something I suggest trying; you can get incredibly results) keep in mind that the sun shifts north and south in the sky depending on season AND that the sun rises and sets at different times every day. If you sustain it a couple weeks, you won't notice a difference however. Sustaining a painting longer than a few weeks (from life) takes a lot of commitment but is worth all the effort. -end edit

    Also, I had the misfortune of having a painting teacher that thought that paintings made during a cloudy day made it a terrible painting. (She said the same thing about painting made during noon-time) The position of the sun (or the amount of it visible) has no effect on the success of your painting. Only you do.

    It's very important for you to keep an eye on your values and tempurature relationships. You should constantly be asking yourself these questions when you're painting... well... anything:

    "Is this darker or lighter than that?"
    "Is this warmer or cooler than that?"

    Most importantly (aside from the protecting yourself from the sun part) you should ALWAYS stay away from formulas (I'm thinking Bob Ross/Thomas Kinkade here) If anyone ever offers you advice on how to always make a painting good, run as fast and far away as your possibly can. They're only setting you up for failure. (And ridicule from your contemporaries)

    Not everything you do will be sucessful, but treat every peice you're currently working on as your best peice ever, and everything you've done as yesterday's news. Idolizing old peices will only lead to frustration. Believe me on that one if anything, I speak from experience.

    And to end on a slightly different note: I personally dislike working listening to music particularly when I'm working outside. I feel that it takes away from the experience of painting outside. I much prefer to listen to what's going on around me. Even if it's a train passing by or a bird chirping, it's all relative to the experience.

    Last edited by Gory; September 3rd, 2005 at 02:10 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    SLC, UT
    Posts
    311
    Thanks
    67
    Thanked 32 Times in 27 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I think the feild needs a little more color, or a few more tones.

    I mostly agree with what gory said about time on a work because of the sun especially sunrise/sunset. However you can always get the raw details , and then later the more precise lines/textures/shadows.

    I've never had an "art teacher"(<what a joke) that seemed to know much anything about art,(clouds ruin paintings? wtf.. that's lame.)
    And I don't ever remember seeing any complete works from any of them.

    interesting suggest I've got for you : Day times are good, but you can't just stick to that, Try some night time/ evening paintings or sketches. or maybe do a daytime sketch of a spot, and then later come back and do a night time one, or do the daytime landscape, and then later , use your daytime ladnscape for ref of a nightime one, see what you can do, imagine how it might look at night.

    ~Mr_S_14

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    New Hartford, NY
    Posts
    151
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    thanks

    Thanks to everyone for the feedback. It's all taken seriously.

    Yes, those streaks you see are gesso. I'm painting on hardboard and 2-3 layers of gesso. I used a larger brush for the application and I think the texture is a bit much on this size study.

    gory- didn't know about the untinted sunglasses I'll definately check that out.

    Again, Thanks to everyone.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •