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  1. #1
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    Buying oils tommorow ?"Edit" Recommend me some books.

    K you all helped me out with what to buy, can you please recommend me some good books on learning to get good with oils, anything and everything, Thanks.



    Hey, im going to be picking up some oil paints tommorow, i have never used them before i have used acrylic paint and so on. It would be great if people could tell me somethings to buy to start me out. Type of paint thats good? Brushes.. Stuff to paint with oils on, where to mix my paint - like the type of pallette, uhh anything else you can give me thanks! But please tell me some main things i should have starting out, my budget is around 100 bucks.


    Thanks.

    Justin.
    Last edited by Zazulathi; August 22nd, 2005 at 09:12 PM.


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  3. #2
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    for 100 bucks, buy online at DickBlick.

    Da Vinci Paints
    http://www.dickblick.com/zz015/33/
    Titanium White and Ivory Black, if you want some colors...well...I'd probably recommend Cad(mium) Yellow Light, Cad Red Light and Ultramarine Blue. The Cads are pretty strong, so only put out a little at a time, and also, unless you are painting straight high chroma, they will need to be greyed...Da Vinci paints are highly recommended here at Watts due to the consistancy and quality of the paint at a relatively low price. If you buy student grade, you get crap paint and use more of it anyway...you get what you pay for...

    For a palette, get "FREEZER PAPER" at a grocery store and tape it to a surface.

    For Brushes, http://www.dickblick.com/categories/acrylicbrushes/ you can use any of the bristles listed, whatever is the cheapest. If they have Robert Simmons at your local art store, those are good for the price. I don't use sables, so I don't know anything about them. You'd be well off to get something like size 1, 2, 4, and 8 in flats, and a 1 round for details. Your flats will turn into filberts as you use them, and rounds...well...what's the point?

    Since you are starting, a good cheap way to go is to get http://www.dickblick.com/categories/canvaspapers/ canvas panels to try out the medium, or go to Home Depot, and get some Masonite cut up into squares (12x16 or so) and buy some Liquitex Acrylic Gesso. http://www.dickblick.com/zz006/18c/ The masonite works out to be a little cheaper, but you have to apply it yourself...so it would be easier to just buy some canvas panels. You could also buy the gesso and gesso over the panels once you have used them to paint multiple times on the same surface (good for starting because its cheap)

    Paper Towels

    Gamsol Oderless Mineral Spirits http://www.dickblick.com/zz004/56/ (to clean your brushes, apply washes) and you'll need a clean glass jar to put it in. The way mineral spirits work is like water with watercolors, only they get real dirty. But the paint sinks to the bottom, and clean stuff to the top, so you can reuse it once it has settled. You pour the clean stuff out into a clean container, wipe out the crap paint, paint in new container (add more as needed). Have one big crap (sealable) container to always be pouring the dirty stuff into, and out of, but one that stays dirty.....

    http://www.dickblick.com/zz057/02/ a cake of bar soap to wash your brushes off in water after you use them

    maybe a palette knife to scrape a surface and paint with. http://www.dickblick.com/zz031/17/ number 50 or 33.

    a big ass tool box at home depot would be good to put all this stuff in....


    if you need clarification on anything or help, PM me.
    Last edited by jetpack42; August 21st, 2005 at 03:26 AM.

  4. #3
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  5. #4
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  6. #5
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    I have those larger 10oz Utrek brand tubes of Titanium White (it's more opaque than Zinc White), Yellow Ochre, Red Cadmium Medium (it's warmer than the vermillions), and Ivory Black. With only those 4 colors, you can make any skin tone combination, and it's more vivacious and luminous than if got flesh tones straight out of the tube.

    For medium, get the regular turpentine, linseed oil, and damar varnish. Mix it 3 parts Turp, 1 part linseed, 1 part varnish, and it makes your oils sily smooth and shiny throughout your painting session.

    Get that brush cleaner (it's a peach colored container with BRUSH CLEANER written in old western). It's the best. Brushes, get at least TWO of every size of 2-16, even #'s only. Also get a large hake brush to quickly cover large areas of the canvas.

    good luck.

    Check out Ignat Ignatov who taught me all this.
    Last edited by CaptainInsano; August 21st, 2005 at 12:23 PM.

  7. #6
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    I went out the other day and spent $300+ on oil painting gear, can't wait to get back into them especially after getting my technical details on oil painting done.

    Btw, if you've never done oils before, i definitely advise getting a technical book on different techniques as well as telling you about sizing, priming, adding things to the paint, fat over lean, varnishes, different supports and how to make your own, etc. And make sure you read it too.

  8. #7
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    I don't know how far you'll be able to go with just $100, but best of luck. Don't skimp on paint or brushes though. You'd just be wasting your money otherwise. Good quality stuff will last you a long time if taken care of.

    I've always loved hardboard. It's easy to get to the size I want just by cutting it, no stretching canvases, and I prefer the hard surface to linen.

    I've a good friend who paints in oil on ABS plastic, which when I heard it thought he was nuts, but the stuff actually sounds rather nice. It's what's used for things like TVs, light switches, computer cases, etc. You can get thin sheets at a good hardware store for about the same price as hardboard, but is much easier to cut. It's pretty slick when you buy it, so you have to sand it down a bit for the paint to adhere, but there's no need for sizing or priming, so no gesso expense. I have yet to try it out myself.

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetpack42
    For a palette, get "FREEZER PAPER" at a grocery store and tape it to a surface.
    Is this the same material as the coated paper sold in pads that art stores sell as disposable palettes?
    Mark Hannon
    Art Direction & Design
    Online Portfolio

  10. #9
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    Here's a good forum thread about ABS panels:
    http://forum.portraitartist.com/show...ight=ABS+panel

    I also found a few thin sheets of birch plywood 18x24" recently for @$9 each at a local hobby store. It's so thin I can cut it with scissors.

    I prefer glass or metal palettes since they're easier to clean and scrape. Be sure and tape the edge of glass if you use that; can be pretty sharp.

  11. #10
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    the tempered glass turntable platter from a microwave oven makes an excellent oil pallette. Also, you can find cheap glass and white ceramic dinner plates and platters at your local big-box discount store, but make sure they have untextured surfaces. Remember, though, if you use a glass pallette, place a sheet of paper underneath so your colors read true when you mix them. This doesn't necessarily apply later on, though, since you're painting over other colors, in which case a neutral or similarly colored background to your painting in its current state would be preferable. For painting surfaces, the cheapest way to go it the masonite panel, though it takes a bit of sanding and preparation. However, the time and effort you put into a well-made stretched canvas will have a noticeable effect on the way you treat the painting. You'll prepare your reference materials and sketches more thoroughly, and you'll be more conscious of the painting as an object of art, thus increasing your attention to craftsmanship. Stretchers are cheap and fun to build, all you need is a bit of light lumber, some clamps, and polyurethane glue (gorilla glue, etc.). Glue a 3/4" quarter-round moulding strip to the edge of a pine 1x2 (make sure you get the straightest 1x2's you can, ignore the derisive attention of the hardware store people), let the glue cure, and cut the ends with a miter box and saw. There's your stretcher strips, and you assemble them by bracing the corners with a bit of masonite nailed into the corners to keep them square, glue the joints, and drive a couple of finishing nails into the outsides of the joints to help hold them while the glue expands and cures. I have a 3'x5' frame in progress, cost me about $10 so far, the canvas is another $10 (would be cheaper if I'd bought a roll of canvas) Best thing to do here is to have a production line going, with a stack of 8 foot glued-up stretcher blanks ready to cut to size, and you can make odd canvases with the scraps.
    If you do use masonite for large panels, you'll need to add 1x2 bracing on the back to stiffen it, and by then you're better off with a more lightwight stretched canvas. Hope this helps.

    EDIT: Jetpack mentioned you can gesso over a painting to reuse the panel, but I highly discourage this unless you're using acrylics. Most economy gesso is going to be acrylic based, and it will not adhere to oil paint properly as it dries. You can put oils on top of acrylics, but not the other way 'round. You'd be better off taking thinner and a rag to it and scrubbing all the paint off, down to the gesso.
    Last edited by M.C.Barrett; August 21st, 2005 at 07:53 PM.

  12. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by figure2
    Is this the same material as the coated paper sold in pads that art stores sell as disposable palettes?
    I think so, it feels the same.

  13. #12
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    Anyways, keep the tips coming guys, anything and everything is helpful to me, thanks for all the tips. I went out today and bought some stuff. Spent 140 bucks. I think im going to back in about 2 weeks or so and get some more supplies when i have more money to blow. Cause i never realized how much a fairly big size tube of oil paint can cost, big dif than acrylics- 15 - 40 dollars I was amazed. I had to get the 37 ml tubes. Seem kinda small but they will have to do.

    What i bought -

    Paints - I bought the brand Gamblin, i have heard these have extremely high quality paints. I have heard many good things about them. And i liked them too.

    To start out i got -

    Ultramarine Blue, Alizarin Crimson, Yellow Ochre - Woulda got the cadmium yellow but it was hella expensive. Sap Green - Cause i do lotsa landscapes and wanted a green, Titanium White, and i somehow got a tube of Torrit Grey for free, prob wont have any use with grey, but we'll see.

    Brushes - 4 - Filbert

    Got a Number 2, 4, and 8 and a #5 round
    A set of 5 pallete knifes.

    Materials - Odorless Mineral Spirits, and some Linseed Oil, Cloths, paper towls, some old jars...

    Anything else you think i need for beginning?

  14. #13
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    I think you can get the basics with just 100 bucks.

    The 4 colors I mentioned (yellow ochre, cadmium red, black, white) are all you really need.

    3 GOOD brushes (Monarch brand), Flat size 2, 6, 10.

    Turpentine & Linseed oil for your medium, and brush cleaner.

    Hopefully you got some empty jar to mix your medium in, and a simple dinner plate (transperant glass) could be your pallette.

    have fun!

  15. #14
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    K you all helped me out with what to buy, can you please recommend me some good books on learning to get good with oils, anything and everything, Thanks.

  16. #15
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    Collins Artist Manual and Encyclopedia of Oil Painting Techniques are the two I have, together they have just about all the technical information you need.

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