Starting (again) to paint: crits and hints welcome!! :-)

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  1. #1
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    Starting (again) to paint: crits and hints welcome!! :-)

    hello folks
    I am a graphic artist from Rome, Italy; even if I work mainly on graphic design and photography, my true love is still painting; unfortunatley I am self taught in this field and since I stopped practicing since too much time, now I discover myself losing even the yet poor skills I had.
    "never give up" says the motto so I'm starting back from the basics, with very simple exercises: I'd love to have any kind of critique and advice to both improve and motivate myself and keep on practicing:

    here are my first ones, done from photo reference:

    this one turned out quite well I think, but of course it was the easiest one I could think of:

    Starting (again) to paint: crits and hints welcome!! :-)

    Starting (again) to paint: crits and hints welcome!! :-)

    the second didn't turn out as good as the first, the can floats on bkg and the overall shape has some problems:

    Starting (again) to paint: crits and hints welcome!! :-)

    Starting (again) to paint: crits and hints welcome!! :-)

    any comment and suggestion will be highly appreciated, thanks in advance
    Fabio

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  3. #2
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    Well hey, I think you’ve noted the most obvious critique I can note with regard to the jar floating off the background.
    I am also not too convinced that the ball is resting on ground either, so there is something to work for.
    Maybe you’re losing the sense of grounding because your working from photo reference, where there is none? Or it is obscured?

    Painting still life objects like this, you don’t NEED to work from photo reference, and id love to see some more of your work done from real life objects. Being able to pick them up, feel their texture, and realize their weight upon the surface they stand may really help your rendering.

    I'll give you the link to this light tutorial (which I seem to link in virtually every post I make!) which MAY be of use, but if your sat there, enjoying what your doing, studying how light falls on real objects, and producing paintings like the above, perhaps its not necessary to read these tutorials at all.

    Keep up the good work, keep enjoying it!

    Thanks for sharing,
    ~ Ben

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  4. #3
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    thanks for your reply ben :-)
    I decided to use photo reference just to be more confortable because having real objects with a constant lighting near my computer would be too difficult; both objects have their gorund in the reference so I decided to post the original images so you and the other people maybe can point out better my mistakes

    I think that one of the mistakes in the secon painting is that I had no idea of how to reproduce the subtle texture of the ground, that helped giving the sense of perspective to the ground plane

    I think you missed to link the tutorial but I'll search in your previous posts to find it :-D

    Starting (again) to paint: crits and hints welcome!! :-)
    Starting (again) to paint: crits and hints welcome!! :-)

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  5. #4
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    I have made another quick painting, took me an hour and a half more or less: the result is not good in my opinion: did I rise the bar of complexity too early? next try with a less complicated subject; I post also a 1:1 crop and the original reference so you may point out better my mistakes
    thanks in advance to all
    Fabio
    Starting (again) to paint: crits and hints welcome!! :-)

    Starting (again) to paint: crits and hints welcome!! :-)

    Starting (again) to paint: crits and hints welcome!! :-)

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  6. #5
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    Hi there,
    In my opinion you cannot raise the bar of complexity too early, you know what you can handle, or what you are willing to handle at this time, and you don’t always have to create a finished piece.
    Don’t think of anything as a failure, there are no mistakes in painting.
    In these pieces your aiming for realism. You can crit your own work yourself by being analytical, you may need to return to it with fresh eyes and examine what works and what doesn’t, which parts actually look like what you were drawing, and which parts do not.

    Looking at your 1:1 shot, some of your marks looks fairly rushed, thou you do have an impressive array of them for 90 mins.
    Accuracy is the key. Spend a long time, looking really, REALLY hard at what your drawing, the texture, the colour. You need to have it in your head, before you can transfer it to the canvas. Use a magnifying glass to look up close too…it works!
    Don’t be afraid to spend hours working on one little section, because if you get that section looking right, you will have covered a lot of ground

    Also, I think the shadows on most of these pieces appear a bit too rushed, it seems the subtlest difference in tone can change it from appearing believably ‘on the ground’ and not, but it is hard going on white! Try placing some of these items on cloth/fabric, it’s a difficult thing to render, but it may raise the bar for this work and look more interesting that a white background!

    Looking at the photo refs for the earlier pictures, the background lighting on YOUR jar piece, is vertical…the light is pushing up and down, which doesn’t explain how the shadow is formed, which may be why it appears floating. In the photo reference the light ‘whooshes!’ in…coming from the right hand side, swooping across the background and hammering the shadow out to the left, do you see what I mean?
    Its not easy thou, because its shot on a white background, so it basically is floating A hard task, but good practice!

    Oh and your comment about consistent lighting…what a paint huh! Maybe set up a lamp, the lighting may be a little extreme, but maybe it will leave the shape carved out for longer. One of the pains of life drawing, but one I believe you just gota work through!

    Ack! Sorry about forgetting the link
    http://www.itchy-animation.co.uk/tutorials/light01.htm

    Phew, I hope some of this ramble will be helpful to you, please keep us updated!

    P.S. That’s a really crazy fruit!
    P.S.S. Some nice photography on your site

    ~ Ben

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