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  1. #1
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    Artist's solution for loss of motivation?

    So... I'm pretty sure that many of you has lost motivation to do art now and then...
    I love art w/ my heart but sometimes trying to become the best artist is hard...
    =P
    I was wondering how you guys get back up on your feet and start art'ing < made up word ... again..


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  3. #2
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    i just look around at all these young buck artists coming up, and think about how hard i have worked to get this far, and i tell myself i gotta hang. looking at great artists always motivates me to get off my lazy ass and do some new shit. man you are still in school! you gotta be lovin life right now. if i can give you some golden advice, work your ass off while you are in school. now is the time you can find your voice. wait til you are in the real world and have to sometimes do work you dont necessarily want to do. i have to fight to do my own stuff these days, due to the fact that im working on like 5 different projects as i write this. so there, let that be your motivation to do some shit, you can just pick up a pencil and do whatever you want. you can explore and experiment. use every moment you have to take advantage of that. art is a very worthy endeavor i think, and you are in that wonderful molding stage where you can make big discoveries if you work hard. and its fukkin fun learning new shit. hope this helps.-c36

  4. #3
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    Motivation steems from having good habits and methology. Don't sit around and wait for inspiration to walk by, because it doesn't work like that. Inspiration comes after a while, AFTER you already drew 10 pages that day. It's not something that comes like lightning from a bright sky. You have to work for it. Working hard and having fun is Everything.

    A good way to start is by breaking all your small habits you have today. Start with small things, as long as you do things differently. Try to break a habit every day. Eat something else for breakfast, go for a walk, switch to a new brand of pencils, start some new habits. This will make you used to breaking bad habits, it will be easier next time to motivate yourself to draw instead of watching TV. It won't feel like a big wall you have to climb, since you already started doing so many other new things! This also goes true for trying out new subject matters etc. Stagnation is your biggest enemy!

    Developing your skills is all about methology and devotion (if you ask me), because you don't grasp new concepts overnight. You need to drill it and make art a part of your natural reflexes. Only then you can start expressing yourslef in your art. I'm not there yet, so I'm merely giving you a mix of quotes here. But I also think that realizing all this is a big step. Ask Coro, I'm sure he would never had reached this level without making art a major part of his life. While I'm at it: I am a big fan of your art Coro .

    Another thing you can do (and this is 100% foolproof) is to join one of the sketch groups near you. Look for one in the subforum of this forum. Physically meeting people who are as motivated as you does wonder for your creativity and gives you a good excuse to draw more. Quite soon it will be hard Not to draw something every day. This is what made the change for me. If you have firends with the same interest you can hang out with them and have a social life at the same time, always a good thing. Meeting once a week to draw will give you a good habit, something too look forward to. Nowdays our Sunday sketchgroup meetings are holy for me, I never plan anything else on Sundays.

    Good luck. Hope this helps. I wish somebody stressed for me how immensly important this is a long time ago. Your attitude decides what you become.

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  6. #4
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    There is nothing more motivating than your boss staring over your shoulder. Being a staff artist for a number of years worked great for improving my work ethic.

    Now that I work freelance I've kept the working habits. Soo somehow you've got to get into the habit of working all the time and then you wont want to stop.
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  7. #5
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    wow thanks for the advice guys. I'll take your suggestions and slow slip them into my life...
    Right now I'm just so damn busy w/ school.... I want to do 3D MODELINg but they keep on putting me into these foundation classes... I know I know... they are important... =P
    For me... when I feel down or something... I go on art websites and see what people are doing as artists...
    interviews really inspire me.

    beh... I have to do my Color and Design final...
    and 2 more finals to go!! My God... this school is going to murder me..

  8. #6
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    for me, i know there are moments i get burnt out and fall into a slump. But i've noticed that the slump will last for a while and ZIP i'm back up doing 12-16 hours a day of drawing again.

    Knowing that the slumps are results of burnouts are important for me - it lets me catch myself so that i'll slow down or take a breather... go fishing or whatnot.

    I know great artists who worked SOooo hard in their early years. as they gradually get older, they spend less time. Bill whittaker spends maybe 4-6 hours a day painting. takes the weekend off (or so he says when i met him), and he's a renowned established artist.

    As long asyou know you enjoy the process, then inspiration comes and goes. Trying too hard to find inspiriation can also just get you frustrated when you dont get inspired from all the searching.

    unfortunately, i've seen a lot of students who only seem to want the end result... not the process... so those students never really stay inspired or motivated. They never get better because they don't sit down and start (which can be the hardest thing to do: just sitting down and starting)

  9. #7
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    I Dont know what would help you personally but usually when I dont feel the urge to draw ill go play guitar wich somehow inspires me to draw, listening to music does this sometimes too as it lets me to melt the line and the sound. Try and find out, a simple jogging trip can help? I dont know, for me music usually does it.

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