Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Next to Black Pyramid
    Posts
    865
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 84 Times in 46 Posts

    painting.. on the cheap.

    Hi! i am getting into painting and have a set of gouache paints. I was wondering what would be a good thing to paint on instead of canvas. Because canvas is way to expensive and i just need to practice on something cheaper. I was wondering what people paint on instead of canvas that is farly good to work with. With either acrylic or gouache paint.


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,201
    Thanks
    4,875
    Thanked 16,685 Times in 5,021 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Blahm
    Hi! i am getting into painting and have a set of gouache paints. I was wondering what would be a good thing to paint on instead of canvas. Because canvas is way to expensive and i just need to practice on something cheaper. I was wondering what people paint on instead of canvas that is farly good to work with. With either acrylic or gouache paint.
    Gouache isn't usually used on canvas anyway. The priming isn't absorbent enough and the paint can crack if used too thickly on a flexible surface. Use some sort of paper; smooth watercolor paper, bristol board, or illustration board.

    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    830
    Thanks
    57
    Thanked 92 Times in 50 Posts
    First off, I would never recommend using gouache on canvas. It'd be the equivalent of painting onto a loofa sponge.

    If you're using gouache, you can get pads of watercolor paper for less than $5 at nearly any art supply store. I think gouache works best on "pre-sized" paper, like watercolor paper, because the paper is treated with special glue so that it absorbs your paint evenly, and it allows you to lift the color back off the paper (to a certain extent) if you make a mistake. You'll learn that certain colors stain paper more than others.

    If you're using acrylic, you can buy pads of "canvas paper." Acrylic is basically liquid plastic, so you can paint onto nearly anything if you're creative & layer some gesso on as a base. But obviously if you're looking for better, more predictable results, I'd say stay on the middle path and go with canvas paper.

    Don't use gouache on the canvas paper, it won't adhere well. Don't use the acrylics on the watercolor paper cause the paper is too absorbent (unless you were to put gesso on it first, but that's kinda more trouble than just buying a pad of canvas paper.) Just because you use water with these paints doesn't mean they work the same way. They are two different mediums with their own characteristics. Use the right tool for the right job. Each pad is inexpensive enough that you could buy one of each.
    Last edited by Jessica Hook; July 20th, 2005 at 01:23 PM.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Next to Black Pyramid
    Posts
    865
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 84 Times in 46 Posts
    thanks for the replies! you guys are a huge help.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    I'm hiding under your bed!
    Posts
    265
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    There is nothing cheaper than Masonite. You get a huge sheet 4' x 8' for about 5$. It has a very smooth side and a side with quite a bit of texture. Just gesso and sand to your liking and it works great. If you go this way use untempered masonite, tempered masonite has oil impregnated in it.

    Only really two thing you have to watch out for:

    1. Masonite is heavy, mostly a problem with large pieces so don't buy it any thicker than .25" thick.

    2. It will warp a bit if you store it leaning up against something, so hang it up or store it flat.

    I've been using this stuff for years, with no complaints.
    Hope this helps.
    (Insert stupid, pointless, and offensive signature here)
    www.wayofthegeek.com My web comic full of stupid geekiness.
    www.carterillustration.com My website filled with freelancing EVIL.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Next to Black Pyramid
    Posts
    865
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 84 Times in 46 Posts
    great suggestion Pale, i will try that. Do they sell gesso at art stores?

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Thousand Oaks, CA
    Posts
    174
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 1 Post

    Here's some really good notes on gouache painting btw.


  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    I'm hiding under your bed!
    Posts
    265
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    lol, Blahm, an art store is just about the only place you can get gesso. It's an artist's material about as commen as brushes and turpintine.

    Gesso is an acrylic material that you brush, spray, whatever over your canvas or in this case masonite to create a working surface. You have to do it if you Oil paint or the oil paints destroy the canvas.

    Most people apply it and then sand it, sometimes multiple times till they get a surface that they'd like to paint on. I wet sand mine till it's as smooth as possible, but a freind of mine likes to have his so textured it looks like mountains. You can add acrylic paint to it as well to tint it.
    (Insert stupid, pointless, and offensive signature here)
    www.wayofthegeek.com My web comic full of stupid geekiness.
    www.carterillustration.com My website filled with freelancing EVIL.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    3,233
    Thanks
    860
    Thanked 849 Times in 457 Posts
    Plain ol' latex primer can be used instead of gesso if you really want to work cheap.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,201
    Thanks
    4,875
    Thanked 16,685 Times in 5,021 Posts
    But...
    If you're working in gouache you probably don't want a primed surface in the first place.

    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    san diego ca
    Posts
    375
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 5 Times in 2 Posts
    Good ol' fixler.

    -tiny
    Being stubborn towards humanity since 1982

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Thousand Oaks, CA
    Posts
    174
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 1 Post
    yea, gouache is a water based medium. You don't need to gesso a surface for gouache.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    I'm hiding under your bed!
    Posts
    265
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Didn't think about that. Masonite is brown, you would have to use gesso to get a white surface, so I don't know if you want to try it.

    Course if you want to go acrylic it can't be beat.
    (Insert stupid, pointless, and offensive signature here)
    www.wayofthegeek.com My web comic full of stupid geekiness.
    www.carterillustration.com My website filled with freelancing EVIL.

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Next to Black Pyramid
    Posts
    865
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 84 Times in 46 Posts
    i just bought some acrylics today. Im going to try what that guy suggests in that little tutorial that Madsamoen posted. But i dont totaly get what he is saying lol. How you have to go from light to dark without changing the chroma, but you cant use white or black?

  16. #15
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,201
    Thanks
    4,875
    Thanked 16,685 Times in 5,021 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Blahm
    But i dont totaly get what he is saying lol. How you have to go from light to dark without changing the chroma, but you cant use white or black?
    Of course you use black and white, but not just black and white (and maybe not black at all, but that's a separate issue).
    From the Fixler notes:
    Contrary to any belief, you do not make a color lighter by simply adding white. That's the last way to do it. The simplest way to prove it is to take a color and add white to it, then mix more white to it. As you continue to do that it becomes whiter, yes. But it shifts into a cool color. All colors, when white is added, become cooler. You have to compensate for the effect of white and warm the color up with a little yellow or some other light-warm color. Yellow itself is sometimes too light, so you might start with a grayed yellow, to kill the blue. Try yellow ochre.

    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron

  17. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    australia mate
    Posts
    1,624
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 79 Times in 25 Posts
    i paint on cut up cardboard boxes when i feel cheap. it's a good excuse to buy a box of beer.

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Designed by The Coldest Water, we build the coldest best water bottles, ice packs and best pillows.