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Thread: any color blind artists out there???

  1. #61
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    Chiming in too here as a color blind artist... 99% off all color deficient people suffer from R/G color blindness. I believe it has something to do with the wave length of the percieved color coming in incorrectly. The problem may also be associated with the brain. There is a lot of info and speculation, but not enough money being put into research I think. The problem isn't exactly dire to most people who suffer from it. I don't think it was mentioned but J.P. Targete is also R/G color blind. I have seen the guy work and his pallet looks pretty unorganized. Even I don't know how he does it, or how he can distinguish the hues, but I know I have gotten a lot better and telling the differences between certain hues and subtleties through practice, correction, and focus. Hopefully someday they will find a fix for this, but as it stands I don't think enough people care. Anyways, yeah.. I try not to let it bother me very much. It's a mild handicap, if that.

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    Extollere: Most people with R/G "colorblindness" aren't "colorblind" they only have troubles distinguishing , for example, red berries in a very green forest.

    my father told me that when he looked at red berries in the same situation, he only saw the outline of the berries.. no color what so ever related to 'red'

    also.. Most people who are R/G color deficient goes through their whole life without ever noticing. Also 'statistics' say that every 7th man and every 100th woman are born with red/green color deficiency...

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    Wikipedia's article on color blindness explains the different types of color-blindness.

    Thanks for the thread! I'm not colorblind, but I carry the gene for red-green colorblindness. We'll know in a few years if my son is red-green colorblind or not. He's got a 50% chance. I was curious how that would effect him if he chose visual arts for a career.

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  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dile_ View Post
    Extollere: Most people with R/G "colorblindness" aren't "colorblind" they only have troubles distinguishing , for example, red berries in a very green forest.

    my father told me that when he looked at red berries in the same situation, he only saw the outline of the berries.. no color what so ever related to 'red'

    also.. Most people who are R/G color deficient goes through their whole life without ever noticing. Also 'statistics' say that every 7th man and every 100th woman are born with red/green color deficiency...
    You don't quite have it right. What you said is true, but we also see the colors differently then most people. For example, my painting teacher put a green backdrop behind the model who was to be painted. I only know it was green because he said it. To me it looked like a purple brown. However, under a natural light source I could see that there was some green in it because color changes under natural vs tungsten light.

    One interesting thing I have noticed though is all of the artist I know who are color blind have a very strong value sense.

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  5. #65
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    I have difficulty distinguishing shades of light yellow with shades of light green.

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    Present! R/G Blind.

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  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dile_ View Post
    Extollere: Most people with R/G "colorblindness" aren't "colorblind" they only have troubles distinguishing , for example, red berries in a very green forest.

    my father told me that when he looked at red berries in the same situation, he only saw the outline of the berries.. no color what so ever related to 'red'

    also.. Most people who are R/G color deficient goes through their whole life without ever noticing. Also 'statistics' say that every 7th man and every 100th woman are born with red/green color deficiency...
    "Colorblind" is just the term. It's not an accurate description of the condition itself. When I say R/G colorblindness, it's the same as R/G deficiency - which is more accurate. People who have R/G deficiency suffer from it to varying degrees.

    Couple of links here:
    First is a program called EyePilot. You select a color on screen and the rest grey out, letting you see that color a little more clearly.
    http://www.mydigitallife.info/2007/1...-blind-people/

    Next is an interesting program called Vischeck, and Daltonize
    http://www.vischeck.com/daltonize/
    Vischeck gives people with normal vision a simulated color pallet of the R/G deficient. Daltonize takes any image and enhances Red and Green contrast...

    These both seem interesting, but I'd actually be more interested in a program that can change your monitor settings, so that all green and red tones can be adjusted to fit the color blind person's exact deficiency. As it stands Daltonize seems like it does the right thing, but it's a web program limited to uploading images only. This could be useful if there were something like it, but it made permanent changes to your monitor while you used it, so you could paint digitally and have an easier time selecting colors.

    Hmmm

    also interesting is this monitor for color blind people:
    http://gizmodo.com/gadgets/flexscan/...hes-326224.php
    Expensive for what it is though...seems like a software program could simulate the same thing. The only problem would be amping up the contrast (or maybe even the saturation) of Red and Green tones without affecting the other colors.

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    I suffer from red green deficiency but to be perfectly honest it doesn't affect me too much. I study Design at university and had no problems as of yet. I can imagine if I were studying fine art doing painting it might cause a few problems but at the same time would possibly make for some interesting results.

    I remeber when I was small I drew a rendition of Monet's Poppy Field without the use of red. My tutor was not particularly impressed...

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    I have trouble telling whether something is blue, purple, or in darker cases black... Does that mean anything?

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    Thumbs up Color Blind Matte Painters

    I'm curious if anyone knows of a color perception deficient matte painter working professionally. That'd be something.

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    I for one am colourblind.

    But nowhere near as much as I used to be, which is strage.

    Doesn't affect my artwork at all, but I have trouble seeing red writing on green paper clearly.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Tarn View Post
    My doctor told me about 6 months ago that i was red/green color blind (whic apparently is fairly rare for a girl). It's really annoying because a lot of colors look just gray to me, and i get yellow/green and purple/blue mixed up. I also get black and blue mixed up, but thats pretty common anyway. I'm known as the "mismatched socks" girl at school
    'sup fellow rarity

    I have trouble with green/brown the most. I'd colour trees in wrong a lot at school (and lots of people got green hair ), and I go by the locations of the colour picker in Photoshop rather than my eyes if I'm painting with greens or browns. But I don't think it's too big a deal.

    My dad is colourblind too, worse than I am. He has been wearing pink shirts for months and only realised when his friends made fun of him for it, haha. And my granddad was too. He fancied himself as an artist, but had to go by the name of the paint on the tube. He ended up with the most garish landscapes and apparently no one had the heart to tell him.

    I'm trusting that my friends will let me know if I'm painting anything horribly wrong!

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  14. #73
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    hah. ya ive always wondered why CA chose this weird green background color.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elfhands View Post
    I'm curious if anyone knows of a color perception deficient matte painter working professionally. That'd be something.
    Yes there are a few. There are a number of ways to work around errors digitally. It's rarely an issue.

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    "Color Deficiency", of course to varying degrees is the Medical term.
    My deficiency causes me trouble in determining blues from purples of similar values,& in poor lighting,red & greens also. Lighting is a major factor for all. True light is necesarry for the best results. Nearby Color reflections also effects results. Simply, the problems are related to the 3 primary colors in varying degrees. Men 90% to some degree, Woman 10%.
    I have found looking for the colors you DO know, in a questionable color, ie; Purple problem, look for the Red, or lack there of. Same w/Green from Brown.
    There is a "Magenta lense" that can help some ID colors, I'm sure there's better options by now. Seeing grey? Likely a dulled color, try brighter lighting or magnifier(?). I'll be getting specialized medical info soon.I'll share what I learn.
    THANKS 2 ALL of YOU
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    My uncle is a (as for as I know) R/G color blind. But he does percieve dozens of different types of Kaki. He's also an artist and actually uses the colorblindness in his favor and plays with it to create different things. He's quite popular and get a lot of requests for portraits in his style.
    So yeah commercial succes is possible with colorblindness, maybe not through the obvious route, but then again isnt the obvious route boring?

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    I'm blind to a small part of the red/green spectrum, but it's not too much of a hassle for me.

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    I've been told I have a red/green colour deficiency. Some blues and purples look a like to me as well as some yellows and oranges. Certain shades of pink look grey to me and I actually have had art teachers call me stupid and make fun of me in front of the class numerous times because of it. Because of this I didn't work in colour up until a couple years ago.

    I think the most noticeable mistakes I make are when I colour people. I always either make them too green or too red. I was playing pictionary the other day and had to draw 'skin' everyone kept guessing rash, burn, disease because I chose a reddish pink by accident.

    the good thing about using a computer to pick colours is that I know where the colours should be when I go to pick them so it's rare when things turn out a different colour than I mean to. Other than making skin too red that is.

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    My grandfather, who used to do book illustrations later in life, lost one eye in the war so either because of that or something else maybe he had trouble seeing depth. Like when you look at a hedge you can't tell which branches are closer, which further. I dunno what it's called though.

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    I just found out the other day that I'm slightly color blind! :o There goes my art career!

    What ever, I prefer grayscale anyway.

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    Sorry to bring up this thread , but i though it was interesting as a color blind myself (red green) that cause me trouble to make difference between some blue and purples , some brown and red , and yellow/green .
    I've always avoided colors ( you're not proud when the teacher ask you why the face you painted is all green when you spend time on it ) , but i figured out that digital painting is a good therapy , not that will make you sight better but at least by not being afraid to use colors , working digitally make it less an issue as you can check the amout percentage of R/G/B , and ending up making less and less big mistakes !

    As to use colorblindness to an advantage i have some doubt, as a color blind is not using weird colors on purpose but more because he thinks those are the right colors, actually it's kind like the palette is missing colors and values for normal sight people .
    So an art made by a color blind generally end up with good colors ( the one he actually see rights) and wrong colors , and it just doesn't fit really well to be honest ( heard from my teachers and co-workers sometimes ) .
    But well , i'm happy that i didn't gave up art like one my teacher recommended me , working digitally ( with time and by remembering place of the colors in the chromatic circle) almost make me feel normal ..yeah almost .
    Anyway i really recommend for all colorblind artist, kind of afraid of using color, to try on digital media , it really help . The only thing i cannot use are levels and color parameter options, cause i dunno what i will end up with , but by placing directly the color i know what color i use even if i don't see it right at least i can "guess" that's the good one looking at RGB values.

    And for people who wants to try what a color blind sight looks like you can check on this website

    http://www.colblindor.com/coblis-col...ess-simulator/

    ( just upload a picture like a chromatic circle like this one on the website )
    I'm not sure if this is really accurate but it may be quite close actually ( well i'm not the one to ask for the color accuracy haha )

    Sorry if my english is not really clear


    P.S : And yeah that's really annoying those color test when people find out you're color blind -_-

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  24. #82
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    Hi guys, I feel it's kinda appropriate to ask this here....

    I've noticed recently that I've got a very hard time distinguishing colours... I can see individual colours just fine I think (meaning I can see when something is red, or orange, or yellow)... but when I'm trying to get the tone right, I can't even concentrate on an area of one solid colour (e.g. a cloudless, solid blue sky) and pick out what tone it is etc.... because I see a sort of overlay of noise..... red blue and green tiny specks I guess? It's quite hard to explain. I'm already short sighted due to prolonged exposure to monitors and tv screens from a young age, and I'm wondering if I'm slightly colourblind as a result too...

    I'll be seeing the optometrist soon, but am wondering if anyone else has this problem too. Any replies would be much appreciated.

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    my color theory instructor was red/green colorblind...
    no lie

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    I am a colorblind artist - a completely colorblind person. I have a disorder called monochromatism that only allows me to see in shades of black and white. My eyes don't have the color receptors everyone else has, leaving me with no color perception.

    I have tried the color lens (which was an interesting experiment that made my brain itch) and my lack of color hinders my every day life. I have a hard time distinguishing when food is cooked, when I am getting sunburned, if a traffic light is yellow or red (green is pretty easy to figure out) and so on...

    I work a lot with black and white in my painting and have used color some with mixed success. The whole point is to not understand how color works and to not really TRY to use it properly. That's what makes colorblind art interesting in my opinion.

    You can see some of my work at http://cbgstudios.com

    My level of colorblindness is a little rare, so I can answer questions if you have any. I inherited it from my grandfather who is also completely colorblind. Even my mother has some color difficiency, but not total like my grandfather and I.

    I have never let my colorblindness hold me back... I have gotten my pilot's license (with restrictions) and other things that usually are affected by color vision. I take it as a challenge...

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