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  1. #1
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    Loomis

    been trying to go through first part of loomis "fun with pencil" but i cant seem to dig the meaning of all the circles used in building cheeks. Do people realy draw cartoons with all the circles and then earase them? Maybe i should just skip cartoon part. I realy just want to learn to draw realistic faces. I just cant seem to feel the shape of cheeks in cartoons. All this draw circle then more circles is kinda random to me ;(

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    I absolutely love the loomis books, but I skipped the 'fun with a pencil' one ... it's not bad to draw cartoons even when you start out, cause it may help you simplify the figure, see what is essential & what is just detail. But cartoons are a simplification (& exageration) from life, so it makes a lot more sense to me, to start from life and to start with the other books.

    The circles and other forms have a purpose, so try to see WHY they are used (for instance, it's easier to make 2 circles in the right proportions & in the right place, and only add detail/form of the cheeks, once you're satisfied with the circles).

    And draw 3D ... don't see 'em as circles, but as spheres, or whatever other volume (box, cone, ..).

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    ty, yeah i sort of realized that its used to simplify proportions but looking at some of his works you can see him making circle for cheeck and then earasing it in some places leaving _ _ _ _ sort of line(begining of book) and i cant figure out what trait they try to highlight. Is it just the fact that it looks more realistic then leaving it in half circle form?

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    if he'd drawn the whole (half) circle for the finished drawing, it'd been too 'heavy', because it's inside of the face (outside can stand thicker lines).

    Check out his later cheek-drawings, I think those are much more clear, for instance the last drawing on page 21 (on the right): think of it as a shape protruding, if the light comes from above, there's light on the upperside & shadow beneath, so you'd shade underneath the circle/oval, but not on the top (since the light hits there). Or a thick line on the shadow side and a thinner line (or even no line, or a 'broken' line like in your example) on the light side.

    Hope that helps

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    yeah ty but he is confusing in terms of not explaining anything lol. He starts teaching with using one line of symetry and then adds another and then adds third. Then he starts making like three circles, it would save me so much time and confusion if he would explain the purposes lol. I mean if drawing 2 lines is better to see where the ear starts why not start the book like that . He just calls them stunts lmao. Maybe i should just get anatomy book and study face anatomy because i just dont "imagine" in cartoon style. How long did it take you personaly to start to feel the shape better?

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    I think Loomis' books such as Fun with Pencil and Figure Drawing for All it's Worth are more aimed towards creating figures and environments completely from imagination although everything he teaches can be also applied towards realistic/ representational goals. But if you're goal is towards the latter, I don't think drawing circles, squares, rectangles etc as basis for the different human structures like arms, legs, head etc would ensure you accuracy. Instead of drawing an oblong/circle for the head I would rather thinkand be reminded of its basic shape and just look for its contours to ensure accuracy. Just use those as guides for you to compare with the actual subject and not as answers to a test.

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    Yea, like patdzon says, those forms (volumes actually) and helplines (like the cross in the face) are to HELP you, just a means to get to the end result, don't get attached to them (if you draw it wrong, then redraw it, they're not holy ... if it doesn't work, don't be afraid to use another shape, or just draw the real thing .... the more you draw and experiment, the more you'll know what works and what doesn't). It's fine to draw a figure like the real thing, but if you keep finding mistakes in your sketch ... you'll notice after redrawing 10 times, you'll start simplifying things (stick, bubble, mannikin-figure like, whatever suits you at the time), because it's just faster to remodel it another 10 times if necessary.

    How long did it take you personaly to start to feel the shape better?
    For me, quite long, for some people it seems to come quite naturally, but not for me. Learning perspective and drawing from life with attention to the volumes, how perspective affects everything, what lighting does, ... helped me a great deal. Drawing boxes, cubes, bottles, I also got a puzzle ball with marks on it which I draw regularly ... that's helping me a lot.

    I checked out your sketchbook, and I think you do have a sense of 3D ... I think what'd help you a lot is, take a look at your drawing again the next day, and try to find all the mistakes, maybe buy some tracingpaper or a lightbox, and trace it while correcting as many mistakes as you can find.

    See ya

    Last edited by NightVision; June 19th, 2005 at 09:05 AM.
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